Extra Credit

EXTRA CREDIT OPTIONS ARE NOT AVAILABLE DURING THE FINAL WEEK OF THE SEMESTER.

Set up and carry out a conference with Mr. Macy

  • 5/0 points possible; entered in Formal Assessments category
  • Available up to three times per semester (once during each six-week grading period)
  • Type out five goals (two for the class, one for other academics, two non-academic) and bring them to the conference.  The two goals for this class should be LEARNING GOALS.  "I want to get an A" is not a learning goal.  "I would like to get better at writing thesis statements" is a learning goal.
  • Email Mr. Macy (tmacy@jeffco.k12.co.us) to set up an appointment

Analysis and Exploration Paper

  • 10/0 points possible; entered in Formal Assessments category
  • Available up to three times per semester (once during each six-week grading period)
  • View one of the TED.com videos linked in "Resources" on this site.  As you watch, take notes and identify the speaker's thesis, audience, and evidence.  Jot down at least three direct quotes you will use in your paper.
  • In one to two pages, present thoughtful, academic analysis of the video you watched.  Take a stand on an issue or idea from the speaker, and support with point/evidence/analysis.  Include at least three direct references to statements made by the speaker, and contribute something new to the academic conversation.  Finally, explain how the issues at hand relate to you, both as a learner and as an individual.
  • Turn in notes from the video, a handwritten draft, typed final draft, and works cited.
 
Useful Digital Resource for Students
Contract with Mr. Macy to create a digital resource (vodcast, video, rubric, study guide, etc.) that can be shared online with future EHS students.  Speak with Mr. Macy ahead of time to develop a plan and decide on a point total.
 
Book Trailer for your book of choice
  • Use Windows Movie Maker or iMovie to create a 3-5 minute film that promotes  your book of choice--it's like a movie preview, but for a book!  This must be a book that you read this semester, with at least some of it being read at the start of class each day.
  • 15/0 points possible; entered in Formal Assessments category
  • Available up to two times per semester
  • Book Trailer must be shared with the class
  • The book you are reading must be registered with Mr. Macy at least three weeks before turning in the book trailer.

  Rubric:

__/2 Name and book title on title page

__/2 Mentions plot, setting, characters, and genre; includes at least two quotes from the text

__/3 Voice over, including why we should or should not read the book

__/2 Images and sound

__/3 Works cited: MLA-formatted listing of all sources used (include web sites, song sources, books...EVERYTHING..."google images" is not a source)

__/3 Overall presentation and creativity

__/15 Total

*Please see Mr. Macy or check out the Hall of Fame for examples of book trailers
 
 

Whopper Paragraph

  • 10/0 points possible; entered in Formal Assessments category
  • Available up to three times per semester (once during each six-week grading period)
  • Compose an 11-sentence "whopper" paragraph that discusses a specific element of one of the texts from class
  • Use the template on the class web site (below)
  • Turn in a handwritten draft, typed final draft, and works cited
 
WHOPPER PARAGRAPH TEMPLATE
 
Create a powerful, well-supported, 11-sentence body paragraph that follows the point-evidence-analysis format by using the template below.  Each number below represents one sentence.  Be sure to follow MLA conventions (see vodcasts for a refresher) for introducing and citing quotes and paraphrases.  In a nutshell, this paragraph includes a topic sentence; three ideas that each feature the introduction of an idea (point), supporting quote or paraphrase (evidence), and detailed explanation of the evidence (analysis); and a transition sentence that hints at the next paragraph.  Many students find it helpful to print this template and handwrite a draft of the paragraph in the space provided.  To be clear, every sentence in the paragraph should support your topic sentence, which, in turn, directly supports your thesis statement.
 
 
            1.  Topic sentence: introduce the paragraph and what you will discuss.  You may consider including the three ideas you
            will discuss in this paragraph.
 
 
 
 
 
            2.  Introduce first idea (POINT).
 
 
 
 
 
            3.  Quote or paraphrase that supports the first idea (EVIDENCE).  Include introduction and citation.
 
 
 
 
 
            4.  Detailed explanation and analysis of the preceding quote/paraphrase related to first idea (ANALYSIS).
 
 
 
 
 
            5.  Introduce second idea (POINT).
 
 
 
 
 
            6.  Quote or paraphrase that supports the second idea (EVIDENCE).  Include introduction and citation.
 
 
 
 
 
            7.  Detailed explanation and analysis of the preceding quote/paraphrase related to second idea (ANALYSIS).
 
 
 
 
 
            8.  Introduce third idea (POINT).
 
 
 
 
 
            9.  Quote or paraphrase that supports the third idea (EVIDENCE).  Include introduction and citation.
 
 
 
 
 
            10.  Detailed explanation and analysis of the preceding quote/paraphrase related to third idea (ANALYSIS).
 
 
 
 
            11.  Conclude the paragraph and transition to the next paragraph.
 
 
 
 
Nice work!  This structured writing format has been proven effective at the high school, undergraduate, and graduate levels.
 
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