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Unit 5: Arguments in Our World through Kafka's "The Metamorphosis"

Gregor Samsa Eats a Whopper

Highly-Structured Writing Assignment for Kafka’s The Metamorphosis

 

Look at your class notes about themes of modernism that are presented in this text.

 

Use the “whopper paragraph” format (below) to compose one, two, or three (confirm your plans with Mr. Macy) eleven-sentence paragraphs that discuss Kafka’s use of modernist themes in The Metamorphosis.  This template is posted on our class website.   If you like it, use it!

 

Recommendation: choose a single modernist theme for each of your whopper paragraphs.

 

Each paragraph should first be written by hand and then typed (double space, size 12, etc.).

 

WHOPPER PARAGRAPH TEMPLATE
 
Create a powerful, well-supported, 11-sentence body paragraph that follows the point-evidence-analysis format by using the template below.  Each number below represents one sentence.  Be sure to follow MLA conventions (see vodcasts for a refresher) for introducing and citing quotes and paraphrases.  In a nutshell, this paragraph includes a topic sentence; three ideas that each feature the introduction of an idea (point), supporting quote or paraphrase (evidence), and detailed explanation of the evidence (analysis); and a transition sentence that hints at the next paragraph.  Many students find it helpful to print this template and handwrite a draft of the paragraph in the space provided.  To be clear, every sentence in the paragraph should support your topic sentence, which, in turn, directly supports your thesis statement.
 
 
            1.  Topic sentence: introduce the paragraph and what you will discuss.  You may consider including the three ideas you will discuss in this paragraph.
 
 
 
 
 
            2.  Introduce first idea (POINT).
 
 
 
 
 
            3.  Quote or paraphrase that supports the first idea (EVIDENCE).  Include introduction and citation.
 
 
 
 
 
            4.  Detailed explanation and analysis of the preceding quote/paraphrase related to first idea (ANALYSIS).
 
 
 
 
 
            5.  Introduce second idea (POINT).
 
 
 
 
 
            6.  Quote or paraphrase that supports the second idea (EVIDENCE).  Include introduction and citation.
 
 
 
 
 
            7.  Detailed explanation and analysis of the preceding quote/paraphrase related to second idea (ANALYSIS).
 
 
 
 
 
            8.  Introduce third idea (POINT).
 
 
 
 
 
            9.  Quote or paraphrase that supports the third idea (EVIDENCE).  Include introduction and citation.
 
 
 
 
 
            10.  Detailed explanation and analysis of the preceding quote/paraphrase related to third idea (ANALYSIS).
 
 
 
 
            11.  Conclude the paragraph and transition to the next paragraph.
 
 
 
 
Nice work!  This structured writing format has been proven effective at the high school, undergraduate, and graduate levels.
 

 

 

ĉ
Travis Macy,
Jan 20, 2012, 9:55 AM
Ċ
Travis Macy,
Jan 20, 2012, 10:11 AM
ĉ
Travis Macy,
Jan 20, 2012, 9:55 AM
ĉ
Travis Macy,
Jan 20, 2012, 9:55 AM
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