Rehabilitation Neuropsychology


Ph.D Programme

at the

F. R. Carrick Institute for Clinical Ergonomics, Rehabilitation, and Applied Neurosciences of 

Leeds Metropolitan University

GRADUATE PROGRAMME IN

CLINICAL REHABILITATION NEUROPSYCHOLOGY

 

Director:

Professor Gerry Leisman

 

INTRODUCTION AND DESCRIPTION

A graduate in Clinical Vocational Rehabilitation Neuropsychology works towards the restoration of function through behavioural and engineering means to get individuals of all

ages, who are impaired by illness or by accident or who were born with a disability, to participate in society in productive and meaningful ways. The program trains professionals

who will conduct research and apply that research to solve problems in rehabilitation.  Graduates of the program will be well-trained experienced clinicians with a broad

background in behavioural neuroscience (including learning and cognitive sciences)

motivation, clinical (adult or child), cognitive, human factors, engineering, and forensic psychology. The aim is to stress standard and novel assessment and treatment strategies employing traditional neuropsychological as well as engineering approaches to

rehabilitation while at the same time training the participants in the requisite skills necessary to be general practitioners. 

 

MISSION

The mission of the Graduate Program in Clinical Rehabilitation Neuropsychology is to provide students with the scientific and clinical training necessary to work towards the restoration of function through behavioural and engineering means to get individuals of all ages, who are impaired by illness or by accident or who were born with a disability, to participate in society in productive and meaningful ways.

 

GOALS AND OBJECTIVES

  1. Provide in-depth knowledge of brain and non-brain based communication disorders throughout the lifespan.
    1. Students will be able to describe functional communication impairments as well as those associated with anatomical, physiological, and neurological anomalies and syndromes.
    2. Students will obtain knowledge of communicative impairments associated with neurological, traumatic, and developmental etiologies, as well as intervention strategies necessary to remediate such impairments.
  2. Provide in-depth knowledge of brain and non-brain based motor and mobility disorders throughout the lifespan.
    1. Students will be able to describe functional motor impairments as well as those associated with anatomical, physiological, and neurological anomalies and syndromes.
    2. Students will obtain knowledge of motor impairments associated with neurological, traumatic, and developmental etiologies, as well as intervention strategies necessary to remediate such impairments.
  3. Provide in-depth knowledge of brain-based sensory disorders throughout the lifespan.
    1. Students will be able to describe functional sensory impairments as well as those associated with anatomical, physiological, and neurological anomalies and syndromes.
    2. Students will obtain knowledge of sensory impairments associated with neurological, traumatic, and developmental etiologies, as well as intervention strategies necessary to remediate such impairments.
  4. Provide in-depth knowledge of brain and non-brain based cognitive disorders throughout the lifespan.
    1. Students will be able to describe functional cognitive impairments as well as those associated with anatomical, physiological, and neurological anomalies and syndromes.
    2. Students will obtain knowledge of cognitive impairments associated with neurological, traumatic, and developmental etiologies, as well as intervention strategies necessary to remediate such impairments.
  5. Provide in-depth knowledge of brain and non-brain based memory disorders throughout the lifespan.
    1. Students will be able to describe functional memory impairments as well as those associated with anatomical, physiological, and neurological anomalies and syndromes.
    2. Students will obtain knowledge of memory impairments associated with neurological, traumatic, and developmental etiologies, as well as intervention strategies necessary to remediate such impairments.
  6. Provide in-depth knowledge of brain and non-brain based emotional and adjustment disorders throughout the lifespan.
    1. Students will be able to describe functional memory impairments as well as those associated with anatomical, physiological, and neurological anomalies and syndromes.
    2. Students will obtain knowledge of memory impairments associated with neurological, traumatic, and developmental etiologies, as well as intervention strategies necessary to remediate such impairments.
  7. Provide in-depth knowledge of assessment strategies throughout the lifespan for intellectual and cognitive disorders, memory disorders, motor system and movement disorders, and sensory disorders.
    1. Students will be able to perform intellectual and cognitive assessments of children and adults.
    2. Students will be able to perform memory assessments of children and adults.
    3. Students will be able to perform motor assessments and gait analyses of children and adults.
    4. Students will be able to perform sensory assessments of children and adults.
  8. Provide in-depth knowledge of assessment strategies for pain management throughout the lifespan.
    1. Students will be able to perform assessments of children and adults with chronic pain and to develop patient treatment plans.
    2. Students will be able to perform psychological interventions for chronic pain and palliative care patients including: cognitive behaviour therapy, marital therapy, relaxation therapy, training in self-hypnosis and biofeedback.
  9. Provide in-depth knowledge of assessment strategies in imaging sciences, ergonomics, electrophysiology, and biomechanics.
  10. Develop critical thinking and problem solving skills.
    1. Students will be able to apply knowledge of research literature to evaluate and to treat individuals with neuropsychological impairments.
    2. Students will be able to differentially evaluate individuals with neuropsychological disorders.
    3. Students will be able to accurately analyze their clinical skills, respond appropriately to constructive criticism, and develop strategies for improvement.
    4. Students will be accurately analyze their research skills and those of others, respond appropriately to constructive criticism, and develop strategies for improvement.
    5. Students will develop a thesis proposal acceptable to department faculty
  11. .Enhance written and oral communication skills and information      literacy.
    1. Students will be able to accurately compose evaluation reports that reflect the nature of the individual’s deficit.
    2. Students will be able to formulate written treatment plans with objectives and goals that when implemented are likely to result in significant changes in behaviour.
    3. Students will be able to describe the research literature relevant to Neuropsychology, Ergonomics, and Rehabilitation Sciences.
    4. Students will be able to design and execute independent research under the direction of faculty.
  12. Provide the theoretical and applied expertise to select, use, and analyze the methodologies available to evaluate and treat individuals with neurobehavioural disorders.

            a.     Students will be able to collect and interpret backgroun information relevant

                 to the assessment process from available sources.

            b.     Students will be able to select, administer, and/or adapt standardized and

                non-standardized measures of neurobehavioural   function to meet client

                needs.

c.     Students will be able to determine an individual’s need for

services, the level of service needed, and the intervention model  required.

d.     Students will be able to construct functional, ecologically valid

intervention plans that include specific short and long-term objectives to meet the needs of the “whole client.” e.     Students will be able to select and consistently implement

appropriate intervention techniques to meet a client’s identified needs and to modify these techniques as needed.

Prepare students for doctoral level study in neuropsychology, rehabilitation, ergonomics, and research.

   m. Students will develop an implementable proposal for research on a topic that

        objectively meets the criteria of “addition to knowledge.”

    1. Students will be able to evaluate and critique published research.
    2. Students will be able to perform original research, including reviewing the literature, selecting appropriate analytic methods, performing statistical or other analysis, and concluding on the basis of evidence, in written form.

 

PROGRAM DESCRIPTION:
This is an intensive program leading to both an M.S. in Clinical Rehabilitation Neuropsychology 
and readiness for accelerated doctoral training in this area.  In addition to the didactic training, 
intensive externship experiences are provided at affiliated clinical training sites.  
 
Some areas of training included in the curriculum are:
Cognitive sciences; clinical psychology (adult and child); forensic psychology; human learning, 
memory, judgment, decision sciences; engineering psychology; developmental disabilities; 
imaging sciences.
 

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS:

Applicants must possess a baccalaureate degree with a major in Psychology or a minimum of 36 credits in Psychology including the following courses:

·         Introduction to Psychology,

·         Introductory StatisticsExperimental Psychology with laboratory,

·         Physiological/Biological Psychology (the syllabus must cover brain/behaviour relationships),

·         Abnormal Psychology,

·         Cognitive Psychology (interchangeable with a combination of courses including Memory, Perception, and Language).

 

Those without a degree in Psychology may make up the requirements during their tenure in the program, if otherwise suitably qualified.

 

Applicants must:

  • Submit transcripts of undergraduate and all prior graduate work.
  • Possess a GPA of 3.2 or better in their undergraduate work.
  • Submit 2-3 letters of recommendation, one of which must be from a professor who taught the student Experimental Psychology, a laboratory course, or has supervised research with the applicant.
  • Submit two   papers   from   psychology   courses or laboratory courses; one must be a laboratory paper and the other a term paper.
  • Provide a clearly written statement of professional goals and how one plans to achieve them.

 

By appropriate record of achievement as well as one or more interviews, applicants must satisfy a multi-institutional admissions committee, that their preparation indicates high potential for successful advanced study in Rehabilitation Neuropsychology and skills necessary to work intensely with patients and families in great need.

 

Applicants will be required to take standardized psychometric tests in mechanical problem solving and in creativity.

 

There are rolling applications. There are no SPRING admissions.

 

ADVANCED STANDING:

In all cases, advanced standing may only be granted by challenge examination for credit.

 

Students entering the program with Master's degrees or graduate level courses in other disciplines may be given some advanced standing. This will be subject to evaluation by the program faculty committee.

 

Students entering the program with graduate level courses in the Neurosciences may, likewise be given advanced standing for courses in the Neurosciences sequence.  This will be subject to evaluation by the program faculty committee.

 

In any case, all students will be required to sit for the Qualifying and Comprehensive Examinations at the end of the second year of the program.

 

TUITION, FEES AND EXPENSES

The tuition and fees, established for the 2006-2007 academic year, is as follows:

Full-time tuition, per annum (3 trimesters)                               $18,700

Tuition deposit (non-refundable, applies toward tuition)                   200

Per credit charge                                                                            666

Application fee                                                                                  50

Student activity fee, per annum                                                        40

Material & book fee, per semester (to defray cost of psychological

test equipment – 2nd year students only)                                           50

Graduation fee                                                                                200

Transcript fee                                                                                   10

Late registration fee                                                                          50

Returned check fee                                                                           40

Stop payment fee                                                                               50

Withdrawal fee                                                                                100

 

The University reserves the right to change the above tuition and fee schedule without prior written notice. 

 

If a student is required to retake failed courses or clinical externships, the student will be charged the current per-credit rate. 

 

Actual personal expenses for books, travel, housing, food, supplies, and other items will vary greatly from student to student.  All students are required to carry health insurance.  The program subsidizes malpractice coverage for second year students.  Travel and room and board for clinical assignments may affect student costs.  Students are encouraged to meet with a financial aid counselor early in the application process to plan for these expenses. 

 

PROGRAM CALENDAR

 

Semester

Start Date

End Date

Fall 2006

Sept. 5, 2006

Dec. 21, 2006

Spring 2007

Jan. 29, 2007

May 24, 2007

Summer 2007

June 4, 2007

June 28, 2007

Fall 2007

Sept. 3, 2007

Dec. 20, 2007

Spring 2008

Jan. 30, 2008

May 22, 2008

Summer 2008

June 2, 2008

June 26, 2008

Fall 2008

Aug. 26, 2008

Dec. 24, 2008

 

CURRICULUM

Recommended Sequence of Required Courses for the First Two Years of the Program:

 

Year One

Semester I: Fall                                                                                     Credits

IBMB 415 Brain Mechanisms in Language Deficit            3

IBMN 515 Human Functional Neuroanatomy                   3

IBMB 500 Physiological Psychology I                      3

IBMB 400 Physiological Basis of Adult Abnormal Behaviour 3

IBMB 200 Introduction to Research Methods & Methodology

      (Inferential /Multivariate Statistics)        3

IBMB 705 Research Advisement                             1

TOTAL                                                          16

 

Semester II: Spring

IBMB 650 Vocational Rehabilitation Neuropsychology       3

IBMB 410 Introduction to Clinical Neuropsychology        3

IBMB 530 Behavioural Neuropharmacology                   3

IBMB 503 Psychometric Test                               3

IBMB 520 Job Analysis and Performance Measurement        

           (Human Factors-Ergonomics)                    3

IBMB 706 Research Advisement                             1

TOTAL                                                          16

 

Semester III: Summer

IBMB 515 Human Motor Control, Development, & Rehab.     

IBMB 560 Principles of Developmental Neuropsychology          3

TOTAL                                                           6

 

 

Year Two: 

Semester IV: Fall

IBMB 618 Psychological Therapies I                       3

IBMB 710 Dissertation Advisement                         2

IBMB 751 Externship in Clinical Neuropsychology          2

IBMB 506 Neuropsychological Assessment                   3

IBMB 511 Behavioural Assessment                          3

IBMB 707 Research Advisement                             1

TOTAL                                                          14

 

Semester V: Spring

IBMN 525 Clinical Neurology                              3

IBMB 752 Externship in Clinical Neuropsychology          2

IBMB 201 Qualitative Analysis                            3

IBMB 619 Psychological Therapies II                      3

IBMB 711 Dissertation Advisement                         2

IBMB 708 Research Advisement                             1

TOTAL                                                                                                                   14

 

Semester VI: Summer

IBMB 753 Externship in Clinical Neuropsychology          2

IBMB 670 Professional Ethics in Clinical Neuropsychology 2

IBMB 346 Psychology of Social Behaviour                  3 

TOTAL                                                           7

                      

            TOTAL CREDITS = 73                                        

 

GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS FOR M.S. PORTION OF PROGRAMME

Each student in the programme is required to successfully pass a written comprehensive examination at the conclusion of the 5th trimester. 

 

Each student is required to submit a research proposal during the middle of the 5th trimester in the programme. 

 

Each student must maintain a GPA of 3.2 or better to remain in the program. 

 

Year 3 < xml="true" ns="urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:office" prefix="o" namespace="">

 Fall Semester:

IBMB 220  Regression and Multivariate Analysis            3

IBMB 360  Cognitive Psychology                            3

IBMB 361  Cognitive Psychology Simulation Laboratory      1

IBMB 720  Dissertation Research                           2

IBMB 755  Internship In Clinical Neuropsychology

          and Rehabilitation                              0

IBMB 709  Research Advisement                             1

                                                TOTAL                                                        10

                                                                                                                           

Spring Semester:

IBMB 685  Human-Computer Interaction in Rehabilitation     3

IBMB 721  Dissertation Research                           2

IBMB 756  Internship In Clinical Neuropsychology           

          and Rehabilitation                              0    

IBMB 710  Research Advisement                             1

TOTAL                                                         6

 

Year 4

 Fall Semester:

IBMB 686  Engineering Psychology in Rehabilitation        3

IBMB 722  Dissertation Research                           2

IBMB 757  Internship In Clinical Neuropsychology

          and Rehabilitation                              0

IBMB 711  Research Advisement                             1

TOTAL                                                                                                                                              6

 

Spring Semester:

IBMB 687  Engineering Psychology in Rehabilitation II.    3

IBMB 723  Dissertation Research                           2

IBMB 758  Internship In Clinical Neuropsychology          

          and Rehabilitation                              0

IBMB 712  Research Advisement                             1

TOTAL                                                         6

 

Year 5:

 Fall Semester:

IBMB 724  Dissertation Research                           2

IBMB 759  Internship In Clinical Neuropsychology            

             and Rehabilitation                           0

IBMB 712  Research Advisement                                                                         1

TOTAL                                                         4

                                                                                                                     

Spring Semester:    

IBMB 725  Dissertation Research                           2

IBMB 760  Internship In Clinical Neuropsychology

          and Rehabilitation                              0

IBMB 713  Research Advisement                                                                        1

TOTAL                                                         4

 

During both the first and second semesters of the 5th year, there will be integrating seminars covering the didactic materials of the first two years of the program.

 

Submission of dissertations at the end of the semester

 

Viva voce (oral defense)

 

Students complete requirements Doctor of Philosophy in Clinical Rehabilitation Neuropsychology.

 

 

 

 

 

                                                                                                                                       

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS  

 

                                               Required  Programme Courses:         

 

IBMB 200 Introduction to Research Methods and Methodology 

Laboratory-based graduate level introduction to descriptive and inferential statistics and their roles in psychological research and clinical practice.  Topics include correlation, regression, t-test, Chi square, ANOVA, non-parametric methods, sample size estimation, and probability.  The course also includes topics in experimental design and correlational analysis, including multiple correlation, multiple regression, curvilinear relationships, missing data, interactions, ANCOVA and its generalization, logistic regression, selected complex factorial designs, multiple comparisons, and meta analyses; causal models, construction estimation, and testing of causal models for correlational data.   [3 credits]

 

IBMB 201 Qualitative Analysis

Develops understanding and skills required of field researchers. Participant observation, interviewing, entering the field, establishing trust and rapport, collecting data, content analysis. Purposes and assumptions underlying a variety of qualitative paradigms are examined. Emphasis placed on emergent, complex data analyses. [3 credits]

 

IBMB 220 Regression and Multivariate Analysis

Scientific concepts, matrix theory, and computer techniques of multivariate analyses for psychological research.   Topics  include   cluster   and  factor  analysis,  multiple regression, and  discriminant  functions.  Emphasizes research  and  clinical  technology rather than mathematical theory. Prerequisite:  IBMB 200 [3 credits]

 

IBMB 300 History and Systems in Psychology 

Brief survey of chronological   development of psychology, emphasizing theories. Provides opportunity for intensive examination of a few selected topics. [1 credit]

 

IBMB 310 Psycholingusitics  

Studies   processes  of   perceiving   speech   and   interpreting   it  as  meaningful  and  of  expressing   intentions   to  communicate  as  utterances.   Emphasizes  roles of  the  brain  and  of  perceptual   and   motor   systems.   Writing, gestural   and   animal communicative systems are also treated. [3 credits]

 

IBMB 311 Language   Acquisition  

Development of   syntactic,   semantic,   and phonological structure in children's language; views on the nature of the acquisition process, developmental changes in comprehension and use of language, dialects; systems for comparative study of mature language.  [3 credits]

 

IBMB 320 Principles  of  Learning  

Examines major theories of learning with relevance to instrumental and Pavlovian conditioning, motivation  and affect.  Relevant research on traditional and contemporary issues in learning is explored.  Human learning emphasized.   [3 credits]

 

IBMB 330 Sensation and Perception 

Experimental foundations and theoretical approaches to problems of sensing, perceiving, and interpreting sensory information. Receptor functions and   physiology, discrimination, adaptation, attention, perceptual learning, and psychophysical  methods or research and assessment. [3 credits]

 

IBMB 345 Theories of Personality

Current theories and research are reviewed from several perspectives including psychoanalytic, humanistic, trait, social learning and cognitive.  Topics include  personality  development  and consistency,   personality   change,  biological   determinants,   brain   pathology  and personality, sex differences, the self  and  self-esteem,  and personality as a social inference. [3 credits]

 

IBMB 346 Psychology of Social Behaviour

Current theory and research in social behavior and social issues.  Topics  include social cognition, attribution, affiliation, and social comparison, aggression, equity and social exchange, attitudes, and attitude change, conformity, and  group  dynamics. [3 credits]

 

IBMB 350 Child Development 

Major issues in child development examined in the light of current research and theoretical formulations.  Cognitive development, social development, origins of temperament, the role of early experience, language acquisition, concept formation, the origin of play, moral development, and intelligence testing from several different theoretical points of view including learning theory, Piagetian systems, and psychoanalysis. [3 credits]

 

IBMB 360 Cognitive Psychology 

Lecture portion introduces the study of cognitive processes of human beings  including  memory, conceptual behavior, thinking, imagery, pathology of  language  and   thought,   attention   and    recognition.  Co-requisite:   IBMB 361.   [3 credits]

 

IBMB 361 Cognitive Psychology Simulation Laboratory

Surveys major simulation programs in perception, learning, memory, problem   solving, and discovery.  Students must complete a simulation project as part  of the course requirement. [1 credit]

 

IBMB 400 Physiological Basis of Adult Abnormal Behavior 

Examines recent developments in the attempt to relate basic biological processes to behavioral disorders and/or mental illness.  Discusses animal models of abnormal behavior, their usefulness in making discoveries, and their relevance to human disorders. Topics include physiological influences on anxiety, particularly the role of hormones, biochemical factors in depression,   and relationship of stress to these changes, biochemical theories of  schizophrenia, genetics and abnormal behavior, and psychosomatic disorders.  [3 credits]

 

IBMB 401 Foundations of Psychopathology

Major contemporary viewpoints concerning the nature and etiology of   prevalent forms of psychopathology.  Emphasizes primary source and case  material in the context of the DSM-IV. [3 credits]

 

IBMB 402 Child Descriptive and Experimental Psychopathology

Current views of the classical infantile neurosis.  The infantile neurosis as the  background for understanding the maturational, developmental, neurotic, and characterological disturbances and symptoms of early childhood and  adolescence from the points of view of the Developmental Profile, the GAP,   Winnicott, et al.  Examines neurotic, psychotic, antisocial behavior, learning disabilities, child abuse, and mental retardation.  [3 credits]

 

IBMB 410 Introduction to Clinical Neuropsychology

Introduction to human brain-behavior relationships, with emphasis on the organisation of higher mental functions and the roles of the major CEREBRAL AREAS.   Topics include neural basis and common disorders of language, perception, movement, memory, and behavior control; aging and dementia; closed head injury, neurodegenerative conditions, developmental disabilities, HEMISPHERIC asymmetries and introduction to clinical evaluation procedures. Prerequisites: IBMB 500; IBMN 515 [3 credits]

 

IBMB 415 Brain Mechanisms in Language Deficit 

Nature of language after head injury, stroke.  Assessment of language deficits after brain damage, and strategies for remediation. [3 credits]

 

IBMB 416 Memory and Attention

The main theoretical positions and concepts in clinically applied cognitive psychology. Recent findings related to these positions and key results on recognition, recall and attentional systems are reviewed.  Assessment and  rehabilitation strategies are intensively discussed and practiced.  [3 credits]

 

IBMB 420 Health Psychology and Medicine

Explores the contributions of Psychology and Neuropsychology to the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of injury, dysfunction, and disease to  post-treatment rehabilitation. Practical applications in the design of health promotion and accident prevention programs. [3 credits]

 

IBMB 425 Addictive Behaviors and the Dual Diagnosis Patient  

Theoretical foundations and clinical applications in the treatment of addictive behaviors. Topics include drugs of addiction; eating disorders, interpersonal addiction, gambling, etc.; theories of addiction; relation between addictive  behaviors and both post-head trauma and dual diagnosis patients;  behavioral and psychotherapeutic approaches to treatment.   [3 credits]

 

IBMB 500 Physiological Psychology I 

Intensive survey of the morphological, neurochemical, and physiological aspects of behavior. [3 credits]

 

IBMC 500 Computer Models of Nervous System Function 

Covers continuum neurophysics, artificial neural networks, linear and non-linear models, bifurcation and chaos theory as vehicles for simulating nervous  system function and dysfunction. [3 credits]

 

IBMB 503 Psychometric Test Theory

Theory and practice of measurement, classical test theory (reliability and validity), item response theory, latent trait methods including factor analysis  and logistic latent trait models; scaling models in relation to abilities,  psychophysics, and psychometrics. Computer experience with methods is provided. [3 credits]

 

IBMB 506 Neuropsychological Assessment

This course presents best practice approaches to the assessment of intelligence, cognitive function and dysfunction. The course will discuss methods used in neuropsychological assessment focusing specifically on the examination of cognitive and executive dimensions.  Students will learn how to interpret test findings from psychometric instruments and will develop proficiencies in the administration of those measures.   Report writing will be emphasized focusing on the best ways of integrating test data from multiple sources with behavioral observations and historical information.  Prerequisites: IBMB 200, IBMB 500, IBMB 503, IBMB 520, IBMB 410, IBMB 415 [3 credits]

 

IBMB 508 Assessment in Infancy and Early Childhood

Survey of techniques used in diagnostic testing of infants and pre-school  children.  Emphasis on Gessell, Cattell, and Bayley Infant Scales, Stanford-Binet, WPPSI, and other tests for pre-school children. Prerequisite: IBMB 500  [3 credits]

 

IBMB 510 Physiological Psychology II 

Broad survey of biological basis of learning, motivation, emotion, sensory  processes and perception, movement, and comparative animal behavior,  sexual  and  reproductive behavior  activity, instinctual behavior, neurobiology of  language and thought, and neurophysiology and neuroanatomy in relation to  behavior.  [3 credits]

IBMB 506 Neuropsychological Assessment

 

IBMB 511 Behavioral Assessment

While mental status examination provides cursory information about a patient’s emotional and behavioral functioning, there are a range of tests and measures, which offer refinements to a clinician’s understanding. This course provides an overview of psychological assessment through the use of objective tests.  Measures covered will include those designed to assess child and adolescent behavior, adaptive behaviors and self-help skills, personality and adult psychopathology, and others targeting medical patients. Learning to integrate information derived from these instruments into comprehensive neuropsychological examinations will be discussed.  Prerequisites: IBMB 200, IBMB 500, IBMB 503, IBMB 520, IBMB 410, IBMB 415 [3 credits]

 

IBMB 515 Human Motor Control, Development and Rehabilitation

The course bridges the gap between research in the theories of motor control and clinical practice. As such, this course is directed toward physical and occupational therapy as well as Kinesiology and exercise science applications. The student will learn the current theories of motor control as applied to posture control, mobility, reach, grasp and manipulation. Students will conduct a number of experiments during class to demonstrate key points. [3 credits]

 

IBMN 515 Human Functional  Neuroanatomy 

The structure of the human central nervous system presented with emphasis on the functional significance of its organisation.  [3 credits]

 

IBMN 517 Clinical Systems Neuroscience

Provides basic science background for understanding the mechanism of behavioral disturbances resulting from brain damage.  Special emphasis on   pathological neuroanatomy, neurophysiology, and neuropharmacology, which  is essential for understanding problems related to health and disease. Prerequisite: IBMB  500  [3 credits]

 

IBMB 520 Job Analysis & Performance Measurement

Considers both the theoretical and practical issues concerning performance analysis ergonomic principles and criterion development, as well as alternative approaches to evaluation providing information to meet objectives of the reintegration of the neurologically impaired and mentally ill into the workplace. Includes performance appraisal, skill training and development, compensation, supervision, goal setting, reinforcement, and motive acquisition training. [3 credits]

 

IBMN 525 Clinical Neurology 

Survey of clinical syndromes and disorders in Neurology. Prerequisites: IBMN 515, IBMB 400, IBMB 410, IBMB 500, IBMB 530  [3 credits]

 

IBMB 530 Behavioral Neuropharmacology

Considers chemical transmission in detail. Topics include endocrinology as well as the mechanisms of action of psychoactive drugs, cellular neurochemistry. Explains how psychologists use drugs to study learning, attention, motivation, and abnormal behavior. Prerequisite: IBMB500 [3 credits]

 

IBMB 535 Hormones and Behavior 

Represents application of endocrinology concepts and techniques to problems of motivation and behavior.  Prerequisite:  IBMB 500   [3 credits]

 

IBMN 540 Muscle, Nerve, and Work

Skeletal muscle force is modified and affected by fatigue, velocity of contraction, metabolism, and function within the nervous system.  Force-velocity relationships are examined from a morphological basis involving fiber  type, motor unit recruitment, fatigue, and power output to examine for systems deficit and  recovery.  Prerequisite:  IBMN 500   [3  credits]

 

IBMB 540 Behavioral  Genetics  

Inheritance of behavioral characteristics.   [3 credits]

 

IBMB 550 Gerontology: A  Multidisciplinary  Perspective   Covers biological, psychological and social issues in gerontology.  Topics include brain-state changes with age, learning/memory changes with age and  social impact of increasingly older population. [3 credits]

 

IBMB 560 Principles of Developmental Neuropsychology

Presents principles useful in understanding biobehavioral development   together   with   critical   analysis of theories and research methodologies.   Perspective is comparative, focusing on both human and animal research and on diverse cultures and ecologies. Prerequisite: IBMB 500  [3 credits]

 

IBMB 615 Counseling   Psychology 

Review of basic counseling theory and techniques; Covers processes   underlying individual and group counseling, identification and evaluation of behavioral outcomes, case management, and counseling ethics.  Specialized  approaches to the counseling needs of the brain-injured, developmentally  disabled, and mentally ill and their families.  [3 credits]

 

IBMB 616 Introduction to Family Therapy 

Review of the major approaches to family treatment.  Covers patterns of  family   communication and interactions; family conflict and mechanisms of conflict  resolution; effects of psychotherapeutic interventions on family functioning;  theories and definitions of family psychopathology. [3 credits]

 

IBMB 617 Group Therapy  

Nature of groups, group functioning, and the effectiveness of group interventions. [3 credits] (This course may be interchanged with IBMB 615, 616, 619, or 635). 

 

IBMB 618 Psychological Therapies I

Techniques of psychological treatment, theory and practice of psychological treatment.  The course surveys cognitive and cognitive/behavioral psychotherapies, Beck, Ellis, self-instructional training, cognitive interpersonal problem-solving therapy, and multi-modal therapy, among others. [3 credits]

IBMB 615 Counseling   Psychology 

 

IBMB 619 Psychological Therapies II

Practicum in hypnosis, biofeedback, and behavioral methods in pain management. Practical training experiences in use of hypnosis, biofeedback,   and other instrumentation techniques in behavioral approaches to alleviating pain, and modifying physiological function.  [3 credits]

 

IBMB 620 Psychological Therapies III

A continuation of IBMB 618.  A practicum in the techniques, theory, and practice of psychological treatment.  Review of the major approaches to family treatment.  Covers patterns of family communication an d interactions; family conflict and mechanisms of conflict resolution; effects of psychotherapeutic interventions on family functioning; theories and definitions of family psychopathology.  Nature of groups, group functioning, and the effectiveness of group interventions.  Prerequisite: IBMB 618  (3 credits) (This course is interchangeable with IBMB 616, 617 or 619 as requirements for the degree). 

 

IBMB 635 Practicum in Behavior Change

Practical training experiences in use of behavior therapy in rehabilitation. [3 credits]

 

IBMB 650 Vocational Rehabilitation Neuropsychology

Issues in community reentry after brain damage. Survey of theory, research,  and techniques in maximizing community reentry of post-brain damaged and mentally disordered individuals. Examines methods of establishing and organizing long-term and transitional care facilities, evaluation of  performance, behavior management, training and development, attitude change and motivation, leadership development, group dynamics, and job design. Practicum in the development and adaptation of therapeutic activities. Analysis of work, self-care, and leisure.  Clinical reasoning developed to select  and modify activities for a wide range of neurologically impaired and other  patients.  Activity protocols are developed, tested and critiqued.  [3 credits]

 

IBMB 670 Professional Ethics in Clinical Psychology 

Study of professional standards and ethical principles as they relate to the  professional psychologist's practice and research in the hospital, private  practice, classroom, and in research. [2 credits]

 

IBMB 680 Forensic   Psychology 

Surveys major research and expertise with applications to the legal system, including criminal law and procedure, determinants of criminal behavior, police behavior, plea-bargaining, jury selection and decision making, eyewitness testimony, criminal insanity, sentencing behavior, judicial system's utilization of social science in criminal and civil cases, the psychologist as an expert witness. [3 credits]

 

IBMB 685. Human-Computer Interaction in Rehabilitation.

Theories, methodologies, and data from psychology applicable to interface design, with an emphasis on construction and application of conceptual psychological models. Issues associated with human-computer interface design. Concepts, methods, and data from HCI, cognitive psychology, human factors, artificial intelligence, and psycholinguistics that apply to rehabilitaiton sciences will be discussed.   [3 c redits]

 

IBMB 686 Engineering Psychology in Rehabilitation I.

Concepts, methods, and findings of human performance. Treats the human as a subsystem that receives, stores and processes information, makes decisions, and acts within a human-machine environment system. [3 credits]

 

IBMB 687. Engineering Psychology in Rehabilitation II.

Engineering psychology methods such as task analysis, cognitive task analysis, user testing, prototyping, protocol analysis, cost-benefit analysis, safety and reliability analysis, and multivariate techniques. Prerequisite: IBMB 686 [3 credits]

 

IBMB 700-701 Independent  Study in Biobehavioral Science

The topic is agreed upon between the student and a Rehabilitation Neuropsychology faculty member with departmental approval.  [1 credit each] 

 

IBMB 705-715    Research Advisement

All students must register in each Fall and Spring semester for research advisement as part of the requirements for the degree. [1 credit each semester]    

 

IBMB 720-730 Dissertation  Advisement  

All students must register each semester after  the second year in the program as part of the requirements for the degrees. [2 credits each semester]

 

IBMB 751-753 Externship in Clinical Neuropsychology 

Supervised on and off campus practicum and seminars in psychodiagnostic testing, therapy experience, and rehabilitation of the neurologically impaired in a local clinic, hospital, or agency affiliated with the clinical program.  Prerequisite: Pre-Masters level [2 credits/semester]

 

IBMB 755-765 Internship In Clinical Neuropsychology and Rehabilitation

Supervised   practicum   in diagnostic testing and rehabilitation of special populations in a local clinic, hospital, or agency affiliated with the program.  The internships experiences  emphasize diagnostic testing, evaluation, reporting of findings, grand rounds, case preparation, Nd therapeutic intervention strategies. Students must register each semester after the third year of the program.  Prerequisite: Third year status.  [0 credits/semester]

 

 

 

FACULTY AND RESEARCH INTERESTS

 

  • Gerry Leisman
    Director, F. R. Carrick Institute for Clinical Ergonomics, Rehabilitation, & Applied Neurosciences, Director, Doctoral Program in Clinical Rehabilitation Neuropsychology, Professor of Rehabilitation Neuropsychology Leeds Metropolitan University and Professor, University of Haifa      
    human information processing, neurocomputing, electrophysiology, systems theory, memory neuropsychology, forensic examination, consciousness 
  • Edward Altchek
    Associate Professor 
    medical imaging, clinical neuroscience, autonomic function, thermology
     
  • Robert W. Baker
    Assistant Professor
    clinical neuropsychology, recovery of function after brain damage, psychopharmacology
     
  • Morris Benjaminson
    Professor
    molecular biology, developmental genetics, cytochemistry, biotechnology
     
  • Khosrow Eghtesadi
    Adjunct Associate Professor
    ­acoustics, communication systems, rehabilitation technology
     
  • Arthur Ezra
    Professor
    biomechanics, technology for the disabled
  • Ezra Gampel
    Assistant Professor
    mental retardation, behavior therapy, developmental disabilities
  • Alan Geliebter
    Professor
    eating disorders, autonomic nervous system control, weight control
  • A. Ze’ev Hed
    Professor
    magnetic & solid state physics, medical imaging, electrodiagnosis, acoustics,technology for the disabled, medical ethics
  • Zvi Herschman
    Associate Professor
    pain management, forensic science, psychopharmachology
  • Moshe Kaspi
    Visiting Associate Professor
    game theory, decision theory, cognitive efficiency
  • Paul Koch
    Professor
    neural networks, automata, medical physics, continuum neurophysics, memory
  • Robert Melillo
    Executive Director C.E.R.A.N.
    autism, developmental disorders, functional neuroanatomy
  • Joav Merrick
    Clinical Professor
    mental retardation, developmental disorders, rehabilitation administration
  • Mohammad Morad
    Clinical Associate Professor
    mental retardation, developmental disorders, rehabilitation administration
  • Shigenori Nagatomo
    Adjunct Professor
    subtle energy, meditation, philosophy of science, biomedical ethics
  • Mark Sandberg
    Associate Professor & Director of Clinical Programs
    rehabilitation neuropsychology
  • Reuven Sandyk
    Professor
    pineal physiology, psychoneuroimmunology, neuromagnetic fields, psychobiology
  • Joyce Schenkein
    Associate Professor
    psychophysics, vision after cortical blindness, electrophysiology, clinical neuropsychology
  • Curt Weinstein
    Director of Laboratories
    electrophysiology, imaging, experimental neuropsychology
  • Sidney Weinstein
    Distinguished Professor
    ­neuropsychology, sensory communication, technology for the disabled
  • Lyn Weiss
    Clinical Professor
    physical medicine, electrodiagnostic medicine, movement & gait
  • Alexander Zemcov
    Professor
    medical imaging, brain blood flow, Alzheimer's disease, genetic engineering, nuclear medicine and neurophysiology, signal analysis, technology transfer
  • Robert Zenhausern
    Professor
    experimental neuropsychology, information processing, cognition, neuropsychology