JAY WELLS HOCKEY CAMP - JAY WELLS

JAY WELLS HOCKEY CAMP - HOCKEY SCORE TONIGHT

Jay Wells Hockey Camp


jay wells hockey camp
    jay wells
  • Jay Wells (born May 18, 1959 in Paris, Ontario) is a retired Canadian professional ice hockey player. He was nicknamed "The Hammer" for his tough, physical play.
    hockey
  • field hockey: a game resembling ice hockey that is played on an open field; two opposing teams use curved sticks try to drive a ball into the opponents' net
  • Hockey is an album by John Zorn featuring his early "game piece" composition of the same name. The album, first released on vinyl on Parachute Records in 1980, (tracks 4-9), and later re-released on CD on Tzadik Records with additional bonus tracks as part of the The Parachute Years Box Set in
  • Hockey refers to a family of sports in which two teams play against each other by trying to maneuver a ball, or a puck, into the opponent's goal, using a hockey stick.
    camp
  • Live for a time in a camp, tent, or camper, as when on vacation
  • Lodge temporarily, esp. in an inappropriate or uncomfortable place
  • providing sophisticated amusement by virtue of having artificially (and vulgarly) mannered or banal or sentimental qualities; "they played up the silliness of their roles for camp effect"; "campy Hollywood musicals of the 1940's"
  • temporary living quarters specially built by the army for soldiers; "wherever he went in the camp the men were grumbling"
  • Remain persistently in one place
  • live in or as if in a tent; "Can we go camping again this summer?"; "The circus tented near the town"; "The houseguests had to camp in the living room"
jay wells hockey camp - Adaptation and
Adaptation and Well-Being: Social Allostasis
Adaptation and Well-Being: Social Allostasis
Recently, an interest in our understanding of well-being within the context of competition and cooperation has re-emerged within the biological and neural sciences. Given that we are social animals, our well-being is tightly linked to interactions with others. Pro-social behavior establishes and sustains human contact, contributing to well-being. Adaptation and Well-Being is about the evolution and biological importance of social contact. Social sensibility is an essential feature of our central nervous systems, and what have evolved are elaborate behavioral ways in which to sustain and maintain the physiological and endocrine systems that underlie behavioral adaptations. Writing for his fellow academics, and with chapters on evolutionary aspects, chemical messengers and social neuroendocrinology among others, Jay Schulkin explores this fascinating field of behavioral neuroscience.

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La Coquille owned by a "Corinthian" Sailor, John Clarkson Jay
La Coquille owned by a "Corinthian" Sailor, John Clarkson Jay
John Clarkson Jay's schooner yacht "La Coquille" by Fred S. Cozzens 1886 When Peter Augustus Jay, died in 1843, his son, Dr. John Clarkson Jay (JC) inherited the Jay family's Rye estate. According to his granddaughter, Laura Jay Wells, it was at this time that Jay purchased a yacht precisely because he would be living on Long Island Sound; he paid $1,500 for it and it was aptly dubbed “La Coquille,” the french word for seashell - - all the more apropos, given that his prize array of over 50 -60,000 seashells today forms the core collection of mollusks at the Museum of Natural History in New York City. It was an augur of even greater things to come. Just one year later, in 1844, JC Jay would make history, along with eight other men including John Cox Stevens, in founding the legendary New York Yacht Club in their first clubhouse, "Station 10." Jay would race in the NYYC's first "Trial of Speed" on July 16, 1845 in his yacht, La Coquille, one of 6 schooners and 3 sloops, a race that was witnessed by thousands of New Yorkers. La Coquille raced again in the 2 day regatta called NYYC's first official annual regatta, the following year, held July 17 and 18, 1846. The field had grown to 12 schooners and 2 sloops by this time. To prove their mastery of their vessels, the founders of NYYC then held a "Corinthian" race October 6, 1846 in which John C. Jay participated - the rules for this race were that the owners must sail the boats themselves, "none but club members allowed to sail or handle the boats but each yacht may carry a pilot." This was the first race that John Cox Stevens' celebrated sloop Maria made her appearance along with 5 other "Corinthians" including Jay's La Coquille. (Maria won). On June 6th, 1848, at the 3rd Annual regatta, NYYC finally separated boats into 2 classes and La Coquille was a winner in the 2nd Class. And so the rules of yachting evolved. Sailing was but one of JC Jay's interests and his significant contributions to science and his community endure. He helped establish the NY Lyceum of Natural History (today it still exists as the NY Academy of Sciences,) including serving as its Treasurer and leading the fund for building a structure to house its collections in Manhattan in 1836. He was also reponsible for raising the funds to help build the current Gothic Revival Christ Church in Rye in 1868. JC Jay died in 1891 and the Rye property passed to his descendants, many of whom would go on to be sailors themselves, who owned the estate through 1904. (JHC Archives)
John C. Jay
John C. Jay
When Peter Augustus Jay, died in 1843, his son, Dr. John Clarkson Jay (JC) inherited the Rye estate. According to his granddaughter, Laura Jay Wells, it was at this time that Jay purchased a yacht precisely because he would be living on the Sound; he paid $1,500 for it and it was aptly dubbed “La Coquille,” the french word for seashell - - all the more apropos, given that his prize array of over 50,000 seashells today forms the core collection of mollusks at the Museum of Natural History in New York City. It was an augur of even greater things to come. Just one year later, in 1844, JC Jay would make history, along with eight other men including John Cox Stevens, in founding the legendary New York Yacht Club. Sailing was but one of JC Jay's interests and his significant contributions to science and his community endure. He helped establish the NY Lyceum of Natural History (today it still exists as the NY Academy of Sciences,) including serving as its Treasurer and leading the fund for building a structure to house its collections in Manhattan in 1836. He was also reponsible for raising the funds to help build the current Gothic Revival Christ Church in Rye in 1868. JC Jay died in 1891 and the Rye property passed to his children who owned it through 1904.

jay wells hockey camp
jay wells hockey camp
Pup Parenting: A Guide to Raising a Happy, Well-Trained Dog
Dog owners learn how to apply successful child-rearing methods to parenting their pups—and turn their dogs into loving and responsible members of the family
For most dog owners, a dog isn’t just a pet but a beloved family member. That’s why two internationally known parenting experts have teamed up with an acclaimed animal behaviorist to produce Pup Parenting.

This one-of-a-kind guide—which takes effective child-rearing methods and modifies them to work with the canine set—represents an exciting breakthrough in dog discipline. Pup Parenting:
• helps people choose a breed that fits their family
• provides a simple test to assess a pup’s personality
• presents an easy 5-step plan to bring straying behavior problems smartly to heel

With a firm, positive approach that rejects both the alpha discipline method and the overindulgent reward-based system, Pup Parenting is a companion readers can refer to throughout all doggie life stages.

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