Broadway Theatres

|   theatres west of broadway  |  broadway theatres  |  spring street theatres   |   main street theatres    |

see what's new or add your contribution:  |  facebook.com/losangelestheatres  losangelestheatres.blogspot.com  |


Broadway was the place to be after 1910 with the opening
of the Pantages Theatre (now the Arcade) and the Orpheum
 Theatre (now the Palace). For Los Angeles movie palaces,
mid-sized movie theatres, vaudeville and legitimate theatre,
Broadway became the most sparkling street downtown.

In the column below our exploration of Broadway
theatres starts at the north end of the street and works
south as you scroll down the page. Theatres on the right
are on the east side of the street, those on the left on the
west. The links take you to the alphabetical listings in
the right hand column.

Most of the major theatres have lots of information available
from a variety of sources. We hope our work will direct
you to some interesting items to browse through.  

If you're only interested in those Los Angeles historic
theatres that still exist in the downtown core, our
main Downtown Theatres page is a
 more concise survey.


Action on Broadway:

See our theatre resources listings on our
Los Angeles Movie Palaces site for information
about
the city's "Bringing Back Broadway" initiative.
It's a bold program to breathe new life into the theatre
district via a joint public/private partnership.

Also keep in touch with activities of the
Los Angeles Historic Theatre Foundation and
the
LA Conservancy -- both of which host events
and screenings in historic Los Angeles theatres.




    Broadway Theatres Map    


 Also see our Alternate Names list below.


  Bradley Blvd/ 1st St. 



Mason Theatre
127 S. Broadway
[ demolished ]






L.A. Times
220 1st St.
L.A. History - photos |


       2nd Street      



Blanchard Music Hall
233 S. Broadway
[ demolished ]



Royal Theatre
246 S. Broadway
 [ demolished ]








       3rd Street      

Bradbury Bldg.
(1893, George Wyman)
304 S. Broadway
| LA Places | Big Orange |
| You Are Here  |

Million Dollar Theatre
307 S. Broadway
[ films, concerts ]


Central Theatre
314 S. Broadway
  [ demolished ]


Grand Central Market/
Homer Laughlin Bldg.
317 S. Broadway
| L.A. History - photos |


Cozy Theatre
320 S. Broadway
  [ retail ]




       4th Street      








Broadway Theatre
428 S. Broadway
Judson Bldg. (1906, Charles Aldrich)
  [ retail ]

Eden Musee/ Wonderland
430 S. Broadway
Bumiller/Campbell Blake Bldg. (1907)
  [ retail ]




Optic Theatre
 446 1/2 S. Broadway
  [ demolished ]

American Theatre
 452 S. Broadway
  [ demolished ]


Chester Williams Building
(1926,  Alec Curlett & Claud Beelman)
452 S. Broadway
You Are Here  |

       5th Street      


La Petite Theatre
 508 S. Broadway
  [ demolished ]

Roxie Theatre
 518 S. Broadway
  [ retail ]

Quinn's Superba
 518 S. Broadway
  [ demolished ]
Century Theatre
523 S. Broadway
[ remodeled - retail ]

Cameo Theatre
 528 S. Broadway
  [ retail ]

Arcade Theatre
 534 S. Broadway
  [ retail ]


Arcade Building
(1923, MacFonald & Couchot)
540 S. Broadway
L.A. History - photos |


Shell Theatre
547 S. Broadway
[ remodeled - retail ]

Metropolitan Theatre
553 S. Broadway, 323 W.6th St.
[ theatre demolished, Broadway
  entrance now retail ]


Garnett Theatre
554 S. Broadway
  [ demolished ]


Swelldom /Sun Drug Bldg. (1925?)
555 S. Broadway
You Are Here  |


       6th Street      

Walter P. Story Bldg.
(1910, Morgan & Walls)
610 S. Broadway
| You Are Here  |  Blogdowntown  |

Desmond's
612 S. Broadway
| L.A. History - photo |


Symphony Theatre
 614-616 S. Broadway
  [ demolished ]

Los Angeles Theatre
615 S. Broadway
[ special events ]
Schaber's Cafeteria /
Les Noces du Figaro
620 S. Broadway
| L.A. History - photos |
Unique Theatre
629 S. Broadway
[ demolished ]

Palace Theatre
 630 S. Broadway
  [ rentals, special events ]


Palace of Pictures
 642 S. Broadway
 Forrester Bldg. (1907)
  [ retail ]


Haas Building (1914, Morgan,
Walls & Morgan; new facade 1974)
650 S. Broadway
| You Are Here  |


       7th Street      

703 S. Broadway + an early
entrance on 7th St.
[ church ]


Lankershim Hotel (1905, demolished
-- now a parking garage, 1992)
700 S. Broadway
| Photos of LA - postcard  |
| Daily Mirror  | You Are Here  |


<<< 1/ 2 block west
Palace of Pictures
318 W. 7th St.
[ retail ]





Globe Theatre
744 S. Broadway
[ club, music events ]

The Chapman / Los Angeles
Investment Co. Building 
(1912, Ernest McConnell)
756 S. Broadway
| LAPL - 1914  |  website  |


Merritt Building (1914, Reid & Reid)
757 S. Broadway
1916 - Huntington Library  | c. 1931 - LAPL  |
1939 - USC  | You-Are-Here  |


<<< 1/ 2 block west
Olympic Theatre
313 W. 8th St. + an entrance on
700 block of Broadway (in the 30s)
[ storage ]

       8th Street      

Arrow Theatre
801 S. Broadway, 5th floor
[ offices ]

Hamburger's
(1906, Alfred Rosenheim;
expanded southward 1929)
801 S. Broadway
| L.A. History - photos |
Tower Theatre
802 S. Broadway
 [ special events ]

Garrick Theatre
802 S. Broadway
 [ demolished ]

Southern California Music Co.
/Singer Building (1922, Meyer & Holler)
808 S. Broadway
| California State Library - 1924  |
| You Are Here  |


Rialto Theatre
812 S. Broadway
 [ possible Urban Outfitters ]

Wurlitzer Building
818 S. Broadway
(1924, Walker & Eisen)
You Are Here  |

Brown-Israel Outfitting
820 S. Broadway
( 1922, Benjamin J. Bloser)
| You Are Here  | Photos of Los Angeles  |

Tally's Broadway
833 S. Broadway
 [ demolished ]


Platt Music Co.
834 S. Broadway
(1927, Walker & Eisen)
| LAPL - c.27  |  LAPL - c.27  |
| You Are Here  |

Mission Theatre
838 S. Broadway
 [ demolished ]

Orpheum Theatre
 842 S. Broadway
  [ concerts ]

Majestic Theatre
845 S. Broadway
 [ demolished ]


Eastern Columbia Bldg.
849 S. Broadway  (1930, Claud Beelman)
| LAPL -1930  | LAPL - 1930  |
| LA PlacesYou Are Here  |

9th & Broadway Bldg.
(1929, Claud Beelman)
850 S. Broadway
You Are Here  |


       9th Street      


Blackstone Dept. Store
901 S. Broadway (1917, John Parkinson)
(apartments)
| SoCal ArchitectureLA Conservancy  |
| You Are Here  |

United Artists Theatre
933 S. Broadway
[ theatre and Ace Hotel ]

Western Costume Lofts
(1923, Kenneth MacDonald Jr.)
939 S. Broadway
| You Are Here  |









    Olympic Blvd.   





<<  looking toward Hill St.
        [ Mayan and Belasco stagehouses ]








       11th Street      




Herald Examiner Bldg.
1111 S. Broadway  (1914, Julia Morgan)
Big Orange  |  You Are Here  |







       12th Street      








            Alternate Names            


  [ This list just covers theatres on Broadway
 + 2 on side streets.  See our downtown directory
for a more complete list. ]


Alameda Theatre see United Artists Theatre
933 S. Broadway

American Theatre
452 S. Broadway

Arcade Theatre
534 S. Broadway

Arrow Theatre
801 S. Broadway, 5th Fl. 

Art Theatre see La Petite Theatre
508 S. Broadway

Astro Theatre see Cozy Theatre
320 S. Broadway

Bard's 8th St. Theatre see Olympic Theatre
757 S. Broadway (1930's) and 313 W. 8th St.

Blanchard Music Hall
233 S. Broadway

Broadway Palace Theatre see Palace Theatre
630 S. Broadway

Broadway Theatre
428 S. Broadway


Broadway Theatre see Garnett Theatre
554 S. Broadway

Broadway Theatre, Clunes see Cameo Theatre
528 S. Broadway

Broadway Theatre, Tally's see Tally's Broadway
833 S. Broadway

Broadway Theatre, Tally's New see Garnett Theatre
554 S. Broadway

Cameo Theatre
528 S. Broadway

Central Theatre
314 S. Broadway

Century Theatre
523 S. Broadway

Cecil Theatre see Royal Theatre
226 S. Broadway

Club 740 see Globe
744 S. Broadway

Clune's see Cameo Theatre
528 S. Broadway

Clune's see Shell Theatre
547 S. Broadway

Clune's Broadway Theatre see Cameo Theatre
528 S. Broadway

Clune's Exclusive see Shell Theatre
547 S. Broadway

Comedy Theatre see Shell Theatre
547 S. Broadway

Cozy Theatre
320 S. Broadway

Dalton's Theatre see Arcade
534 S. Broadway

Downtown Music Hall see Tower Theatre
802 S. Broadway

Downtown Palace Theatre see Palace Theatre
630 S. Broadway

Downtown Paramount see Metropolitan Theatre
553 S. Broadway, 323 W. 6th St. and 536 S. Hill St.

Eden Musee
430 S. Broadway

Erlanger's Mason Theatre see Mason Theatre
127 S. Broadway

Exclusive, Clune's see Shell Theatre
547 S. Broadway

Fouce's Mason Theatre see Mason Theatre
127 S. Broadway

Fouce's Million Dollar see Million Dollar Theatre
307 S. Broadway

Fox Palace Theatre see Palace Theatre
630 S. Broadway

Garrick Theatre
802 S. Broadway

Garnett Theatre
554 S. Broadway

Globe Theatre
744 S. Broadway

Grauman's Theatre see Million Dollar Theatre
307 S. Broadway

Grauman's Cinema Temple see Million Dollar Theatre
307 S. Broadway

Grauman's Metropolitan see Metropolitan Theatre
553 S. Broadway, 323 W. 6th St. and 536 S. Hill St.

Grauman's Million Dollar see Million Dollar Theatre
307 S. Broadway

Grauman's Rialto see Rialto Theatre
812 S. Broadway

Grauman's United Artists see United Artists Theatre
933 S. Broadway

Guterson's Broadway Theatre see Tally's Broadway
833 S. Broadway

Hamburger's Arrow see Arrow Theatre
801 S. Broadway, 5th Fl.

Hamburger's Majestic see Majestic Theatre
845 S. Broadway

Hyman Theatre see Garrick
802 S. Broadway

Kinemacolor Theatre see Tally's Broadway
833 S. Broadway

La Petite Theatre
508 S. Broadway

Loew's State Theatre
703 S. Broadway

Los Angeles Theatre (1931)
615 S. Broadway

Majestic Theatre
845 S. Broadway

Mason Opera House see Mason Theatre
127 S. Broadway

Mason Theatre
127 S. Broadway

Metropolitan Theatre
553 S. Broadway, 323 W. 6th St. and 536 S. Hill St.

Million Dollar Theatre
307 S. Broadway

Mission Theatre
838 S. Broadway

Morosco Theatre see Globe
744 S. Broadway

Morosco's Majestic see Majestic Theatre
845 S. Broadway

Music and Art Building  see Blanchard Music Hall
233 S. Broadway

Music Hall Theatre see Tower Theatre
802 S. Broadway


Music Hall, Blanchard
233 S. Broadway

New Broadway Theatre see Broadway Theatre
428 S. Broadway

New Broadway, Talley's see Garnett Theatre
554 S. Broadway

News Palace Theatre see Palace Theatre
630 S. Broadway

Newsreel Theatre see Palace Theatre
630 S. Broadway

Newsreel Theatre see Globe Theatre
744 S. Broadway

Newsreel Theatre (40's) see Tower Theatre
802 S. Broadway

New Symphony Theatre see Symphony Theatre
614 S. Broadway

Olympic Theatre
757 S. Broadway (1930's) and 313 W. 8th St. 

Optic Theatre
446 1/2 S. Broadway

Orion see Globe
744 S. Broadway

Orpheum Theatre (1911) see Palace Theatre
630 S. Broadway

Orpheum Theatre (1926)
842 S. Broadway

Palace Newsreel Theatre (40's) see Palace Theatre
630 S. Broadway

Palace of Pictures (1914-16)
642 S. Broadway

Palace of Pictures (1916-21)
318 W. 7th St.

Palace Theatre (present)
630 S. Broadway

Palace Theatre (1916-21)
318 W. 7th St.

Pantages Theatre (1910) see Arcade Theatre
534 S. Broadway

Paramount Theatre see Metropolitan Theatre
553 S. Broadway, 323 W. 6th St. and 536 S. Hill St.

President Theatre see Globe
744 S. Broadway

Quinn's Rialto see Rialto Theatre
812 S. Broadway

Quinn's Superba
518 S. Broadway

Rialto Theatre
812 S. Broadway

Riviera Theatre see Mission Theatre
838 S. Broadway

Roxie Theatre
 518 S. Broadway

Royal Theatre
246 S. Broadway

Shell Theatre
547 S. Broadway

State Theatre
703 S. Broadway

Superba Theatre see Quinn's Superba
518 S. Broadway

Symphony Theatre
614 S. Broadway

Tally's Broadway
833 S. Broadway

Tally's Theatre see Tally's Broadway Theatre
833 S. Broadway

Tally's New Broadway see Garnett Theatre
554 S. Broadway

Teatro Broadway see Broadway Theatre
428 S. Broadway

Telenews Theatre (40's) see Arcade Theatre
534 S. Broadway

Teleview Theatre (40's) see Arcade Theatre
534 S. Broadway

Tower Theatre
802 S. Broadway

Unique Theatre
629 S. Broadway

United Artists State (50's) see Loew's StateTheatre
703 S. Broadway

United Artists Theatre
933 S. Broadway

Victory Theatre see Mission Theatre
838 S. Broadway

Wonderland Theatre see Eden Musee
430 S. Broadway

Woodley's Theatre see Mission Theatre
838 S. Broadway


     Photo Resources    


Eric Richardson has posted  a great 2006 photo set on Flickr of views taken by Jim Winstead of nearly every building on Broadway from Temple to 11th. Also see Eric's photostream on Flickr  for other views of Broadway.


| back to top  |






The Tower Theatre -  one of the great
surviving Los Angeles movie palaces.

photo: Bill Counter - 2007

[ click the image to enlarge ]



 about photos from other
websites that appear on this page...

We've tried to give appropriate credit. Please
contact us if there are incorrect attributions, links that
no longer work or other issues. A link near each image will
direct you to a full size version on the website hosting it.
Assume that all the images are subject to copyright
restrictions.  Contact the webmaster of the site in
question concerning reproduction or other use.



American Theatre

452 S. Broadway   | map |

Los Angeles, CA 90013

Dates: Running from about 1910 through at least 1925. It's in city directories starting with the 1910 edition.

Seating: 500

Status: Demolished for the Chester Williams Building built on the northeast corner of Broadway and 5th in 1926. There's an existing one story building (450 S. Broadway) just north of the theatre site that dates from 1908. It appears in the photos as two stories -- it evidently lost the top one at some time.

More Information: See the Cinema Treasures page on the American.

     Huntington Digital Library    

hdl.huntington.org/cdm



An April 1915 G. Haven Bishop photo taken
for Southern California Edison. 

full size view




On the HDL page you can enlarge and pan around to look
at portions of the image. Here's a detail of the entrance
from the photo above.  Click on it to enlarge.

     USC Archives    

digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm


A 1917 view of 5th and Broadway spotted by Nick
Bradshaw shows the American Theatre.The building
at the right (at 5th & Broadway) is proclaiming
 "Last Days -Building Coming Down."
full size view | on Photos of LA: a better version



A detail of the American's facade
 from the USC photo.

Arcade Theatre

534 S. Broadway      | map |

Los Angeles, CA 90013

Opened: September 26, 1910 as the Pantages

Architect: Morgan & Walls

Seating: 1,400

Status:  Closed since 1992. The lobby is now used for retail. The photo is from 2007 -- click on it for an enlarged view.

See our Arcade Theatre pages for more information:
arcade main page  |  exterior  |  auditorium  |
boxes  |
  stage  |  theatre basement  |  booth  |  lobby  |
lobby basement  |  attic  |  roof  |  office building  |
|   systems overview
  |


Arrow Theatre

801 S. Broadway, 5th Floor   |map|

Los Angeles, CA 90014

Opened: August, 1908. This unique theatre was located on the 5th floor of Hamburger's Department Store (later the May Co.) and was also known as Hamburger's Arrow Theatre.  The space devoted to the theatre was 80' x 100'.

It had a stage and offered movies and a wide range of other attractions including minstrel shows, singers, illustrated lectures and meetings. Initial pricing was 5 cents (or 10 cents reserved) -- "Always a good show!"

Architect: Alfred F. Rosenheim, who also designed the Cameo.

Seating: 500, according to an October 7, 1907 L.A. Times article.

Status: The last ads for the theatre appear in 1919. The building still stands but nothing of the theatre remains on the 5th floor.

Roger Vincent reported the building's sale to New York based Waterbridge Capital in an April 2014 L.A. Times story. The article also had a nice history of the building. The new owners plan a mixed use development in the huge building.

The building's first floor had been turned into a warren of swap meet style booths known as the Broadway Trade Center.  The upper floors became a maze of garment manufacturing shops. It was owned by investors in Beverly Hills who were unable to come up with a viable redevelopment scheme. Ideas in the past have included condos and a hotel.  It was placed on the market in 2013.

More Information: See the Tally's Broadway page on Cinema Treasures for lots of great items on the Arrow unearthed by diligent researcher Vokoban (aka Jeff Bridges). Tally's was just down the block at 833 S. Broadway and was swallowed up by a May Co. expansion in 1929.

Mary Mallory's terrific Daily Mirror article from 2013 has some fine research on the Hamburger Building and she details many of the programs presented at the Arrow.

     L.A. in the 1900s    

www.ulwaf.com/LA-1900s



The Hamburger Building page on George Garriques'
fascinating site has lots of information about the
opening of the building. The illustration here is from
 the Los Angeles Herald of August 9, 1908.
larger view


Blanchard Music Hall

233 S. Broadway  |map|

Los Angeles, CA 90012

Opened: 1899   This was a second floor hall with the Bartlett Music Store occupying the main floor. The building was also known as the H. Newmark Building as it was built by and on the site of Harris Newmark's former residence. Mr. Newmark was a leading L.A. citizen who had arrived in 1853.

Seating: 800.  The venue was used for chamber music concerts and other programs. There was another smaller hall seating 150 and a banquet hall for 300. There was also an "Assembly Hall" of unknown capacity. There was also space in the Music and Art Building for studios for 150 musicians and artists as well as a fourth floor art gallery.

The building went all the way through to Hill St. On the 1910 Baist Real Estate Survey map the Hill St. end of the skinny building is marked "Blanchard Hall Bldg." while the Broadway end is labeled "Newmark Bldg."

It's listed in the 1907-1908 Henry's Theatrical Guide. The guide tells us that it was illuminated by both gas and electricity. The proscenium was 16' wide and 18' high with a stage depth of 25'. The Mr. Blanchard was Frederick. W. Blanchard, who had been influential in the music business in Los Angeles and went on to become the first president of the Hollywood Bowl.

Status: Chopped down to a single story around 1959 . Closing date as a performance /studio space is unknown.

More Information:
A bit more is on the Google books preview for "Making Music in Los Angeles."  Also on Google books see "The International Studio." The Los Angeles Public Library has a 1921 facade photo.   On Goliath, the article "The Start of Something Big..." discusses many early entertainment venues in Los Angeles.

     Huntington Digital Library    


A 1958 look at the Blanchard/Newmark Building
shortly before demolition. This is a detail from a
much larger photo by Palmer Connor.
See a very similar 1965 photo by Mr. Connor with Goodwill still
there but the building reduced to a single story!

Thanks to WS1911 for exploring the Newmark and its neighbor to
the south, Boston Dry Goods, on his Noirish Los Angeles post #21943.
He's got maps, aerial views, the works! And thanks to Beaudry, who
located the two Palmer Connor photos for his
 Noirish Los Angeles post #21945.

     A Visit to Old Los Angeles    

www.csulb.edu 



A view of Blanchard Music Hall on Brent
Dickerson's fine tour Broadway Part 2.
full size view

     USC Archives    

digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm


A 1910 view of the Newmark Bldg. from the USC
Archives.  It's from the California Historical Society.
full size view

The photo above is also in the Huntington Library,
where it's attributed to C.C. Pierce as a 1905 photo.

Also in the USC Collection:
 
| Hill St. entrance - 1910 | article:  "Music Halls of Yesterday" |

Broadway Theatre

428 S. Broadway  |map|

Los Angeles, CA 90013

Opened: 1925 by Joseph Corwin of Metropolitan Theatres as the New Broadway in a space formerly a shoe store. The Building, originally called the Broadway Central Building, is a 10 story steel frame structure dating from 1907. 

By 1926 it was just the Broadway. In later years it was called the Teatro Broadway and ran Spanish language films.

See also the Garnett Theatre (known as Tally's New Broadway) and Tally's Broadway Theatre listings for theatres also known as "The Broadway."

Seating: 400

Status: Closed 1988. Renovated in 2007 back into retail space.  The photo is from 2007 -- click on it for an enlarged view.

More information: See our Broadway Theatre page for more information and photos.

Cameo Theatre

528 S. Broadway    | map | 

Los Angeles, CA 90013

Architect: Alfred F. Rosenheim

Opened: October 1910 as Clune's Broadway. It became the Cameo in 1924.

Seating: 900 originally, then 775. It ended up with about 600 in later years. No balcony.

Status:  Closed 1991. Currently retail in the lobby. The 1910 auditorium decor is pretty much intact.   The  marquee photo is from 2007 -- click on it for an enlarged view.

More Information: See our Cameo Theatre page for more information and photos.

Central Theatre

314 S. Broadway   |map|

Los Angeles, CA 90013

Opened: Prior to 1929        Seating: 562

Status: Demolished prior to 1960. The current single story building on the site is recent.

A section of a 1931 insurance map from the Los Angeles
Public Library showing the Cozy and Central theatres. 
full size view  |  more maps

The Central and Cozy Theatres in the Movies:


In "Footlight Parade" (Warner Bros., 1933) we get a quick
blurry shot of what looks like the Central as we're speeding down
from the Million Dollar --in a movie set in New York.
larger view



In the shot above we're looking south on Broadway in
"Between Midnight and Dawn" (Columbia, 1950) starring
 Edmond O'Brien and Gale Storm. The Central, nearest us,
 is playing "Blue Dahlia" (1946) with Alan Ladd.

 The screenshot is from Larry Harnisch's fine blog post
on The Daily Mirror which features other location shots from
the film. The auction storefront is in the Bradbury Building. 
larger view  |  on Photos of LA




We're looking south on Broadway past the Bradbury toward the
Central and Cozy theatres for the finale of "The Killer Who Stalked
New York" (Columbia, 1950). Evelyn Keyes is up on the Bradbury
 ledge. She was after her two-timing boyfriend but the real killer is
 that (gasp!) she has brought smallpox in from Cuba.




Looking down on the Central (below) and the Cozy (on the
left) in "The Killer Who Stalked New York." The Cozy is running
a triple bill with "The Big House" as the main feature.

It appears that they used some Main St. locations for some
of the closeups on the ledge -- the vertical sign for the Hotel
Cecil (640 S. Main) appears in several shots.

More information: The Central Theatre page on Cinema Treasures has all the known information about this theatre.  You can see a bit of the Central marquee (and the Cozy Theatre) in a 1955 view on page 23 of  "Theatres in Los Angeles."

     Huntington Digital Library   

hdl.huntington.org/cdm



A March 1955 photo by Palmer Connor looking
north toward the Bradbury Bldg. and 3rd St. beyond.
 full size view



A closer look at the Central from Mr. Connor's photo.


     L.A. Public Library Collection   

www.lapl.org   



This 1940 view from the Library collection shows the
Bradbury Building, 304 S. Broadway, with the shorter Central
Theatre building just beyond. The taller building farther
 south is the Cozy Theatre building.   full size view

Century Theatre

523 S. Broadway  |map|

Los Angeles, CA 90013

All that is known so far is that was listed in the 1915 city directory. The building on the site dates from 1903, so presumably it once contained the Century.

Cozy Theatre

320 S. Broadway   |map|

Los Angeles, CA 90013

Opened: 1929 or earlier. It's in the 1929 city directory. The Cozy was in a building dating from 1905 across the street from the Million Dollar. In the 60s it was renamed the Astro and was running Spanish language films into the 80s.

Seating: 350

Status: Currently a retail space. The photo of the building here is from 2010 - click on it to enlarge.  Notice it has been shortened to three stories.

More information:   Head to the Cozy Theatre page on Cinema Treasures for research by Joe Vogel, Ken McIntyre and other contributors.

A map from the 50s on Tom Wetzel's Uncanny website shows the shows the Cozy and its neighbor the Central Theatre.  Also see the c.1935 insurance map from the Los Angeles Public Library collection showing the Cozy and Central theatres. 

     Sean Ault Archives by Osiris Press    



A 1974 look north on busy Broadway toward the Astro,
as it was then called.  Beyond is the Bradbury Building.
 Our main feature is Zulma Faiad in "La noche de los
mil gatos" ("The Night of a Thousand Cats").
 full size view | on FB/LATheatres

Thanks, Sean! Sean Ault is a noted historian of transit
 in the Los Angeles area.
You can see many more items
from his Osiris Press transit archive on YouTube.


     L.A. Fire Dept. Archives    

www.lafire.com   



Here's a view of the 300 block in 1939 during
the Gray Building Fire that was unearthed by
Joe Vogel. The Gray Building is at 336 S. Broadway
and the marquees of the Cozy and Central Theatres
can be seen through the smoke at the left.
  full size view

    Ken McIntyre on Photobucket   

s132.photobucket.com/albums/q12/kencmcintyre


Ken's photo from 2007 shows the "Tu Musica"
retail use of the former Cozy Theatre space. 
full size view

    Photos of Los Angeles   

facebook.com/groups/244565982234863


A 1973 look north on Broadway added by Ken McIntyre
to his Photos of Los Angeles page. Here we get the marquee
 of the Cozy, then called the Astro. The building beyond,
where the Central was, has been demolished.  At the end
 of the block at 3rd St. is the Bradbury Building.
full size view  |  a detail  |  on FB/LAtheatres

Also on Photos of Los Angeles are several more views looking north
 toward the Bradbury Building that show the buildings south of it:
c .1893  | 1900  |

    Theatres in Los Angeles   

by Suzanne Tarbell Cooper,
Amy Ronnebeck Hall and Marc Wanamaker.
Arcadia Publishing, 2008.
www.arcadiapublishing.comgoogle books preview



This rare 1955 view of the Cozy Theatre from Marc
Wanamaker's Bison Archives appears on page 23 of "Theatres
 in Los Angeles." Note the Central Theatre on the far left.
full size view - on Google Books

The photo also appears via Ken McIntyre on
Photobucket  and on Photos of Los Angeles. There's
also a re-post on Photos of Los Angeles.


Eden Musee

430 S. Broadway   |map|

Los Angeles, CA 90013

All we know about the Eden Musee is that it was listed in the 1908 city directory. The address would put it in the 1907 Bumiller Brothers Building. From the name, we assume it was a collection of curiosities along with a stage for vaudeville attractions.

The photo here of the Bumiller building is from 2010 -- click to enlarge.  Note that just to the left of the Bumiller Building is the Judson, that housed the Broadway Theatre for many decades.

The 430-432-434 address was also the site of the Wonderland Theatre in 1908. They folded up prior to June 1908 and had an auction to dispose of the furnishings. The Wonderland then moved to a new building at 315 S. Main St., later known as the Jade Theatre.

More information: As of 2012 the Bumiller building is owned by ICO Development.  The Bumiller shows up in some early photos of the Broadway Theatre and the Judson Building -- see our Broadway Theatre page.

Check out two USC Archives views: a c.1906 view from the south (actually the label should be 1907 or later as the Bumiller is there) and a 1928 view of the block from the north.

Garnett Theatre

554 S. Broadway   |map|

Los Angeles, CA 90013

Opened:  1904 or earlier.  554 S. Broadway is in the 1904 and 1905 city directories as the Broadway Theatre. There's an L.A. Times ad for the theatre (listed as at 6th and Broadway) running vaudeville in January 1904.

By March, 1905 it was Tally's New Broadway--not to be confused with Tally's Broadway (833 S. Broadway) which opened in 1910. The 1909 city directory has listings here for both Tally's Film Exchange and Tally's New Broadway.

This became the Garnett after Tally opened the venue at 833 S. Broadway. It gets a listing in The Billboard for 1906 through 1909 as running 3 shows daily. It's listed in the 1907- 1908 Henry's Theatrical Guide.  In the 1909 city directory it gets a listing as Tally's Film Exchange.

Tally had had earlier exhibition adventures on Spring but in an article in Moving Picture World for July 15, 1916 he says that, for him, the real beginning was on Broadway. "It was here, Mr. Tally says, that the first craze on motion pictures started and people used to be lined up for a block or more to get into his theater. The seating capacity of this house was 500 and considered very large. Admission charged was ten cents."

The theatre was on the north end of the same building as Silverwood's department store. The house closed in 1910. Joe Vogel on Cinema Treasures found a May 4, 1910 Los Angeles Herald article discussing the closure. Silverwood's (which had just been on the corner) expanded into the space.

Seating: 500

Status: Demolished. The replacement Silverwood's building currently on the site dates from 1921.

More information: See the Cinema Treasures page. See the Tally's Broadway page for a listing of his other exhibition venues.

     L.A. Public Library Collection    

www.lapl.org 



Here's a photo of the theatre building at 544 S.
  Broadway when it was called Tally's New Broadway.
We're playing "Roosevelt in Africa" from 1910.
 full size view  |  higher-res USC Archives version  |
in the AMPAS B'hend - Kaufmann Collection  |

     Noirish Los Angeles    

skyscraperpage.com/forum/showthread.php?t=170279



A bit wrinkled, but otherwise terrific, look at the
theatre when it was still the Broadway. Tally got it in
 early 1905 and made it Tally's New Broadway.
A big thanks to Mr. Ethereal Reality who found the photo on
eBay and made it part of his Noirish Los Angeles post #16475.

     A Visit to Old Los Angeles    

www.csulb.edu 



A postcard view of the east side of the 500
block with Tally's New Broadway showing
on the right.   full size view

The building in the photo above housing the Sing Fat Bazaar
north of the theatre (later the Elden Hotel upstairs) still remains
 on Broadway. Note the Mercantile Place alley (replaced
 by the Arcade Building in 1923) at the left of the photo.




Another view -- here we're looking south
toward 6th St. with the Tally's/Garnett
Theatre on the left. 
full size view

Compare these views with the later one on the same
page taken after the Arcade Building was constructed.

Visit Brent Dickerson's Broadway Tour Part 3  for many more
vintage views including visits to Clune's (Cameo) and the Orpheum
(Palace). Both cards also appear on our LA Theatres Blogspot page.

     USC Archives    

digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm


This c. 1906 view of the block looking north gives us a
 glimpse of the theatre just to the left of the Silverwood's
store. Closer to us is the excavation for the Story
Building on the SE corner of 6th and Broadway.
 full size view



Another c.1906 view that Douglas Rudd found for Photos
of Los Angeles. Looking north from 6th on the right we get
 a sidewalk sign advertising doors opening at 2:30 for a
 matinee. As for the theatre itself, we just have a sliver at
the far right.  It's from the C.C. Pierce collection.
in the USC Archives  | on Photos of Los Angeles



  A detail of the far right side of the image above
with a sliver of Tally's New Broadway on the right.

Also in the USC Archives:
| 1910 view  -- "Roosevelt in Africa"  -- same as LAPL photo |

Garrick Theatre

802 S. Broadway   | map |

Los Angeles, CA 90014

Opened: As the Hyman Theatre in 1911 (construction was announced September 1910) for theatrical producer Arthur S. Hyman. On November 13, 1911 it has another opening, this time as the Garrick

Architects: Train and Williams. George Edwin Bergstrom did a remodel in 1921.

Seating: 650 on one level

Status: Demolished 1927 to make way for the Tower Theatre.

More information: See our page on the Garrick Theatre.

     L.A. Public Library Collection    

www.lapl.org 


An interior shot of the Hyman/Garrick,
also from the LAPL collection. 
full size view

Globe Theatre

744 S. Broadway    | map |

Los Angeles, CA 90014

Architect: Morgan, Walls & Morgan did the Garland Building, A.F. Rosenheim designed the theatre.

Opened: January 1913 as the Morosco Theatre for legit producer Oliver Morosco.

Seating: 1,300 initially. Later only 782 were used. The second balcony had been closed for decades.

Status:  After a $5 million refurbishment, new operator Erik Chol will reopen the venue in 2015 as a multipurpose space again to be called the Globe Theatre. It ran its last movies in 1986. The floor was leveled for an aborted swapmeet project and for decades it had retail in the lobby.  Until 2011 the auditorium and stage areas were being used as a nightclub with an entrance in the alley.  The photo is from 2007 -- click on it for an enlarged view.

More information: See our pages on the Globe Theatre for more details:
main globe theatre page  |  recent exterior views  |
|
  recent interior views  | 
earlier lobby area views |
earlier auditorium views  | 
attic stage & stage basement  |
other basement areas  |  garland building  |


La Petite Theatre

508 S. Broadway   |map|

Los Angeles, CA 90013

The La Petite Theatre was another of the many nickelodeons that dotted Broadway in the first decade of the 20th century. It gets a listing on The Billboard magazine list for 1907 and 1908. It was listed in 1908 and 1909 city directories as the La Petite. In 1910, depending on whether you looked under "theatres" or "moving pictures & machines," it was listed as both the La Petite and the Art Theatre. In the 1911 and 1912 directories it's still there as the Art.

Seating: 150

Status: Closing date unknown. We assume it was demolished. The building at 5th and Broadway which would have contained #508 dates from 1912. The Johnson building next door, currently #510, was built in 1905.

Sources: See the Art Theatre page on Cinema treasures for a few comments. It's listed in the 1907-1908 Henry's Theatrical Guide.

Note that we also had a Main Street La Petite (later the Galway) and a Santa Monica La Petite.  And 2 locations for the Ocean Park La Petite Theatre.

 

Loew's State Theatre

703 S. Broadway  plus a 2nd entrance (until 1936) at 306 W. 7th Street     | map |

Los Angeles, CA 90014

Architects: Weeks and Day

Opened: 1921

Seating: 2,404

Status:  Currently it's being used as a church. Note the added stained glass in the organ grille area in this 2007 photo.  Click on the photo for an enlarged view.

More Information: See our main Loew's State Theatre pages for more data and photos:
main state theatre page  |  recent exterior views  |
lobby areas   |  auditorium  |
  backstage  |  basement  | 

Los Angeles Theatre

615 S. Broadway     
| map |

Los Angeles, CA 90014

Architect: S. Charles Lee with S. Tilden Norton

Opened: Jan. 30, 1931

Seating: 2,190

Status:  Closed except for film shoots, tours and special events including occasional film screenings. 

The photo is from 2007 -- click on it for an enlarged view.

More Information: See our Los Angeles Theatre pages:
main los angeles theatre page  |  recent exterior views  |
entrance  |  grand lobby  |  inner lobby - main floor  |
lobby - 1st balcony level | basement - intermediate lounge |
basement - main lounge  |  ladies room  |  men's room  |
| auditorium  |  stage  |  booth 
retail and support areas  |

Majestic Theatre

845 S. Broadway    | map |

Los Angeles, CA 90014

Opened: November 23, 1908 with Oliver Morosco in charge.  The theatre occasionally did movies, but was a legit operation most of its life.

Architects: Edelman & Barnett designed the building for M.A. Hamburger, who owned the department store on the north end of the block (at 8th) that would later became the May Co. It's sometimes referred to as Hamburger's Majestic. The Eastern Columbia building would later rise just south of the Majestic.

Seating: 1,700

Status: Demolished in 1933.  Sad.

More Information:  See our page on the Majestic Theatre.

     UCLA Archive -  Changing Times    

www.ucla.edu/library



A 1920 view of the Majestic Theatre building
  from the UCLA "Changing Times" archives.
full size view

Note Tally's Broadway peeking in on the right


Mason Theatre

127 S. Broadway   | map |

Los Angeles, CA 90012

Opened: 1903 as the Mason Opera House.   Operated for years by Frank Fouce showing Mexican films as Fouce's Mason Theatre.

Architect: Benjamin Marshall, Marshall and Wilson -- with John Parkinson. A 1927 renovation was by Meyer & Holler.

Seating: 1,650 seats--2 balconies. Later listed as 1,552.

Status: Demolished 1955 or 56.

More information:  See our page on the Mason Theatre.

     L.A. Public Library Collection    

www.lapl.org



This interior photo is from the Library's
  collection.  full size image


Metropolitan Theatre

536 S. Hill St., 553 S. Broadway
and 323 W. 6th St.   | map |

Los Angeles, CA 90014

Architect:
William Lee Woollett did the theatre, Edwin Bergstrom was responsible for the building.

Opened: January 26, 1923 as Grauman's Metropolitan. It became the Paramount in July 1924 when Sid sold his interest in the theatre and went on to other adventures in Hollywood.

Shown here is the faded sign on Broadway pointing back to the location on Hill St.  Once, there was a Broadway entrance through this building.  The photo is from 2007 -- click on it for an enlarged view.

Seating: 3,600

Status: Demolished 1961.

More Information: For more photos and information see our Metropolitan Theatre page.

     L.A. Public Library Collection    

www.lapl.org   


Here's a rare early 30s view looking north
on Broadway. The Los Angeles Theatre marquee is
  on the left side of the photo. Looking down into the
  next block, you'll see the Paramount vertical. 
  full size view

Million Dollar Theatre

307 S. Broadway   | map |

Los Angeles, CA 90013

Architect: Albert C. Martin did the building, William Woollett was the theatre architect.

Opened: 1918 as Grauman's Million Dollar.

Seating: 2,345

Status: Closed again (except for occasional special events) until a new operator arrives on the scene.  The photo is from 2007 -- click on it for an enlarged view.

More Information: See our pages on the Million Dollar Theatre:
main million dollar page  |  recent exterior views  |
boxoffice area 
|  lobby areas  |  auditorium  |  booth  |
backstage  |   stage basement  |  orchestra pit  |
auditorium & building basement  |


Mission Theatre

838 S. Broadway    | map |

Los Angeles, CA 90014

Opened: September 25, 1913 as the Woodley Theatre. This vaudeville theatre was also known as Woodley's Theatre.  Woodley also opened the Optic Theatre on Main St.

In the 1918 and 1919 directories it's called the Riviera. In 1919 it's listed as the Victory.  Mack Sennett bought it in 1920 and after an expensive Spanish style remodel, he reopened it as the Mission.

Seating: 900

Status: Demolished to make way for the Orpheum in 1925.

More information: See the page on the Mission Theatre.

     Huntington Digital Library    

hdl.huntington.org/cdm



A glorious 1915 view of the Woodley discovered by
Ken McIntyre in the collection of the Huntington
Library. It's a photo by G. Haven Bishop.
full size view

Olympic Theatre

313 W. 8th St. 
  | map |
+ an entrance at 757 S. Broadway in the early 30's

Los Angeles, CA 90014

Opened: 1927 as Bard's 8th St.

Architect: Lewis A. Smith. Charles O. Matcham did a remodel in 1942.

Seating: 600

Status: Closed around 1997 and has mostly been storage or retail since then. The photo dates from 2007 -- click to enlarge.  The building is currently for lease.

More Information: See our Olympic Theatre  pages for more information:
main olympic page  |  recent exterior views  |  interior  |

Optic Theatre

446 1/2 S. Broadway   |map|

Los Angeles, CA 90013

Opened:  The Optic was opened in 1908 or earlier by Robert W. Woodley, who later ran Woodley's Theatre at 838 S. Broadway (later to be Mack Sennett's Mission Theatre).It's in the 1909 city directory.

Status: This one closed prior to December 1910. In 1911 Woodley opened the Optic Theatre on Main Street, which had a much longer run.  The building has been demolished -- the "Broadway Mall" is on the site.

Sources:  See the Optic (Main St.) page on Cinema Treasures for a bit of discussion on the Broadway Optic by Joe Vogel and Jeff Bridges. It's tangled in with lots of interesting data about various Main Street theatres.

     USC Archives    

digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm



A c. 1906 glimpse unearthed by Joe Vogel
in the USC
Archives of this short-lived
Broadway theatre.
Admission 5 cents.
  full size view

Also in the USC Archives:
| looking north from 5th -- full photo with Optic in lower right |

Orpheum Theatre

842 S. Broadway  | map |

Los Angeles, CA   90014  

Opened: 1926

Architect: G. Albert Lansburgh 

Seating:  2,190

Status: Alive and in great shape as the home of concerts, film shoots and occasional film screenings.  The photo is from 2007 -- click on it for an enlarged view.

More Information: See our pages on the Orpheum Theatre for more information:
main orpheum page  | recent exterior views  | lobby  |
|
  lounges  |  auditorium  |  booth  |  stage  |  basement  |  lofts  |


Palace of Pictures

642 S. Broadway   |map|

Los Angeles, CA 90014

Opened: 1914 as a conversion from retail space in Charles F. Whittlesey's Forrester Bldg, which dates from 1907.  Thomas Tally was evidently involved in the project as the building permit announcement included his name. 

The Palace of Pictures was later operated by the Palace Amusement Co with Dr. H.B. Breckwedel as secretary and treasurer and C. W. Nouls as president. They also operated the Symphony Theatre.

Seating: 500 is one estimate 

Status: The Palace moved in February 1916 to a new location at 318 W. 7th St. and this Broadway space was leased to a shoe store.

The space is still being used for retail. For many years the space was occupied by Bond Clothing. The photo here is of the Forrester Building in 2010. Yes, that's the Palace on the left edge of the photo. Click to enlarge.

Sources: See the Cinema Treasures page on the Palace of Pictures for the nice research by Joe Vogel and Jeff Bridges (aka Vokoban) that unearthed some of the mysteries surrounding this short-lived theatre.


Palace of Pictures 7th St.

318 W. 7th St.  | map |

Los Angeles, CA 90014

Opened: February 20, 1916 as the Palace of Pictures and later frequently referred to just as the Palace.

This location (previously the Chocolate Den) is 1/2 block west of Broadway. It's just across the alley from the west side of the Loew's State Theatre. Previously the Palace of Pictures had a space at 642 S. Broadway. Dr. H.B. Breckwedel was the manager in 1916.

Seating: 700 was the announced capacity.  Moving Picture World in 1916 says 633.

Status: Closed January 21, 1921 when the lease expired. The building was remodeled for use by the Vogue Millinery Co. and the Model Cloak and Suit House. The building still exists, with a GNC store in one half. The photo here is of the Palace of Pictures building in 2010. The red brick and terra cotta building to the left is the Loew's State building.

Sources: See the Cinema Treasures page on the Palace Theatre for all the history unearthed by Joe Vogel and Jeff Bridges (aka Vokoban).

Note: If you're looking for the current Palace Theatre, it's at 630 S. Broadway.

     L.A. Public Library Collection    

www.lapl.org


From the Library collection we get a glancing view of the
 Palace facade on the left in 1917.  Note the "Palace"
 vertical on the left side of the street partially
 obscured by a streetlight.   full size view

     USC Archives    

digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm


A view looking west on 7th Street in 1921 from
 the USC Archives. On the extreme left at 7th and
Broadway is the site of 1922's  Loew's State Theatre.

Beyond the alley is the marquee of the Palace Theatre.
Also in view is a roof sign for the Alhambra Theatre
 on Hill St. but note that the sign is not on the
 theatre building itself.   full size view

A detail from the USC image.
larger view


Palace Theatre

630 S. Broadway   | map |

Los Angeles, CA 90014

Opened: 1911 as the Orpheum

Architects: G. Albert Lansburgh and Robert Brown Young

Seating: 2,200

Status: The theatre unveiled a $1 million restoration to celebrate its 100th birthday in 2011. It's used for  theatrical productions, concerts, film shoots, and special events. The photo is from 2007 -- click on it for an enlarged view.

More Information: See our Palace Theatre pages for more information: 
main palace page  |  exterior  |  ticket lobby  |  lobby areas  |
lounges  |  auditorium  |  booth  | 
stage  |  stage basement  |
other basement areas  |  office building  |


Quinn's Superba

518 S. Broadway   | map |

Los Angeles, CA 90013

Opened: 1914 by J.A. Quinn. It was also known as just the Superba.

Status: Closed in 1922 to be turned into a restaurant. Later demolished for construction of the Roxie Theatre.

More Information: See page on Quinn's Superba.

     Wikipedia    

http://commons.wikimedia.org



A dazzling 1920 view of the Superba, Clune's (Cameo) and
the Pantages (Arcade). It's from the New York Times Archive.
 full size view

Rialto Theatre

https://sites.google.com/site/theatresla/home/Rialto_Theatre.JPG
812 S. Broadway    | map |

Los Angeles, CA 90014 

Opened: 1917. Also known as Grauman's Rialto and Quinn's Rialto.

Architect: Oliver P. Dennis

Seating: 1,000 originally. 840 in later years. 

Status:  The space reopened in December 2013 as an Urban Outfitters store with a wonderful restoration of the marquee. It had closed as a theatre in 1987 with the lobby then used for retail.

More Information: See our Rialto Theatre page for more information and photos.

Royal Theatre

246 S. Broadway    |map|

Los Angeles, CA 90012

The Royal Theatre on Broadway was listed in the 1908 and 1909 city directories and was running as the Cecil Theatre in 1910.  Arthur Hyman was running it later in 1910 and 1911. The 1910 city directory lists both the Royal and A S Hyman.  In the 1911 directory there's again a listing for the Royal.  The theatre was in the southern third of a building constructed in 1894.

Seating: 300

Status: Demolished. The building the Royal was in came down for the Hosfield Building (still at 240-244 S. Broadway), a design of Robert Train and Robert Edmund Williams that dates from 1914. A 1921 Baist map identifies that south storefront in the Hosfield as 246 -- a more recent  address for it is 244 S. Broadway.

The theatre had already closed prior to the building's 1914 demolition. Ken McIntyre reports that in 1913 246 S. Broadway got leased to the California Post Card Co. The 1888 City Hall was once abutting the north side of the Hosfield and its predecessor.

     Los Angeles Past    

losangelespast.blogspot.com



On the right we have the building at 240-246 S. Broadway,
on the site now occupied by the Hosfield.  The building figures
 in J. Scott Shannon's post "Old Civic Center - South to City Hall."
 The southern bay (nearest us) was the location of the Royal/Cecil
Theatre. That's the City Hall (1888) to the left, replaced in 1928.
full size view


     L.A. Public Library Collection   

www.lapl.org   


An undated look at the block. The squat building
in the middle once housed the Royal  Theatre. The building
 on the right the city dates as being from 1898 -- still existing
but now chopped down to a single floor.
Also in the collection:

More Information: See Tovangar2's terrific Noirish Los Angeles post #27839 discussing the buildings on the block. Thanks to Diana Leigh for sending the Noirish information our way and finding the two LAPL items above.

Also see the Cinema Treasures page. They have this one listed as the Cecil Theatre.   See the College Theatre page for more on the Hyman circuit.

Roxie Theatre

518 S. Broadway     | map |

Los Angeles, CA 90013 

Opened: November 25, 1931. The Roxie was the last of the Broadway theatres to open -- and was the only one in the art deco style.

Architect: John M. Cooper 

Seating:  Estimates vary from 1,335 to 1,637

Status: Closed since 1989. Retail is currently in the lobby.  The photo is from 2007 -- click on it for an enlarged view.

More Information: See our Roxie Theatre pages:
main roxie page recent exterior views  |  interior views  | 


Shell Theatre

547 S. Broadway  
| map |

Los Angeles, CA 90013

Dates: We have a listing in the 1909 city directory at this address under "moving pictures & machines" for Samuel Stutz.  The 1911 and 1913 directories list it as the Shell Theatre

In an August 1914 article discovered by Cezar Del Valle in the California Outlook, Billy Clune was exhibiting films here suitable for women and families and calling the theatre Clune's Exclusive.

It's listed in the 1915 city directory just as Clune's. By 1916 (if not earlier) it was being operated as a bargain house (5 cents admission) by Clune. Clune also had his offices in the building.  It's listed in 1916 as both the Comedy and Clune's. In the 1917 directory it's listed as only the Comedy Theatre.  It's not in the 1923 directory -- it had become retail sometime prior to that.

Clune's big one on Broadway was called Clune's Theatre (later the Cameo) across the street.   See the Cameo page for a timeline of Clune's other exhibition adventures.

Status: The building, which dates from 1901, has been remodeled a number of times and currently is retail on the ground floor. The photo here is a 2010 view. Click on it to enlarge.

More Information: See the Cinema Treasures page on the Shell Theatre.

     Wally Shidler Collection   



Programs from 1915 and 1916 from Clune's Comedy Theatre
from the collection of Walnut Park based historian Wally Shidler.
Thanks to Wally and also to Michelle Gerdes for finding the
 items in the collection and photographing them.
full size view | inside views

Symphony Theatre

614-616 S. Broadway   |map|

Los Angeles, CA 90014

Opened: August 1914.  In 1916 it was being operated by Mr.and Mrs. C.H. DuBois. The Symphony got a lavish remodel in 1921 (prompting the name New Symphony) including adding 8' of Broadway frontage. It was operated (at the end at least) by the Palace Amusement Co with Dr. H.B. Breckwedel as secretary and treasurer and C. W. Nouls as president. 

Seating: An article in Moving Picture World for July 15, 1916 says "about 750."

Status: The building got sold in 1923 and was demolished for construction of Desmond's department store by architect Albert C. Martin. The current facade of the Desmond's building dates from 1933.

Sources: See the Symphony Theatre page on Cinema Treasures for nice research by Jeff Bridges (aka Vokoban) and Joe Vogel documenting the short history of this theatre.

     Metro Library & Archive   

A postcard view discovered by Cinema Treasures
researcher Joe Vogel. The card shows the 600 block
 of Broadway in 1916. The Symphony Theatre is in
the white building with the arch in the center
 of the block.  full size view




A detail from the card above. Note the
Orpheum Theatre vertical just beyond
the Symphony building.

     Photos of Los Angeles   

www.facebook.com/groups/244565982234863


A wonderful 1921 view of the Symphony discovered by
Kenneth McIntyre and posted on his always informative Facebook
page. We're running "Never Weaken" with Harold Lloyd.
 full size view  |  a re-post  |  review


Tally's Broadway Theatre

833 S. Broadway   |map|

Los Angeles, CA 90014

Opened:  May 2, 1910 by Thomas Tally.  In 1911 it was known as the Kinemacolor Theatre while showing color films in the Kinemacolor process but then went back to the Tally's Broadway name. 

Seating: 900

Status: Demolished for a 1929 expansion for the May Co. department store (originally Hamburger's) just to the north.

More information: See our page on Tally's Broadway

See also our listing for Tally's earlier "New Broadway" venture,  later known as the Garnett Theatre. See the Main Street page for the listing of Tally's Electric (1902), considered to be the first purpose-built movie theatre in Los Angeles.  See the Spring St. page for Tally's Vitaphone Parlor, an even earlier exhibition site.

     L.A. Public Library Collection    

www.lapl.org

 An interior view from the LAPL.
  full size image


Tower Theatre

802 S. Broadway    | map |

Los Angeles, CA 90014 

Opened: 1927 

Architect: S. Charles Lee 

Seating: 906

Status: Available for special events.  The photo is from 2007 -- click on it for an enlarged view. As of early 2010 there were plans to use the building as a restaurant, bar and entertainment venue -- but no action so far.

More Information: See our Tower pages for lots of photos and details:
main tower page  |  recent exterior views  |  lobby  |
lounges and basement  |  auditorium  | 
booth level  |
|   attic  |  organ chambers  |  roof  |  tower  |

Unique Theatre

629 S. Broadway   |map|

Los Angeles, CA 90014

The Unique Theatre was listed in the 1903 through 1909 city directories.  This theatre was running vaudeville (from the Alpha circuit), stock companies and occasional films under the management of Flora E. Hentz and John U. Zallee.

The team had earlier run their Unique Theatre operation at a number of other locations including 456 S. Spring St. and, later, at the former Empire Theatre, 138 E. 3rd St.  It's possible they had other earlier locations before the Spring St. venue. They evidently moved from Spring to Broadway in 1902 or 1903 and were on to 3rd St. by October 1909.

Status: Demolished. The current building at the 629 address, the Baker Building, dates from 1910.  We also had a later unrelated Unique Theatre in East L.A.

More Information: See our page on Broadway's Unique Theatre for more photos and a Unique Theatre program.

     USC Archives    

digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm



A piece of an amazing 200 degree c.1905-1907 panorama
 taken from the roof of the Lankershim Hotel at 7th & Broadway.
In this segment we're looking north with the Unique Theatre on
the west side of Broadway.  The C.C. Pierce photo is in 8 parts.
 full size view  |  detail view

The Unique is in the squat 2 story darker building on the left
with a tall roof sign way above their building.  The large black
roofed building is on the site of the Los Angeles Theatre.


United Artists Theatre

933 S. Broadway   
| map |

Los Angeles, CA 90015 

Opened: 1927

Architect: C. Howard Crane did  the theatre, Walker and Eisen did the rest of the building.

Seating: 2,214 originally

Status: The renovated theatre reopened in early 2014 accompanied by an Ace Hotel in the former office spaces of the building. The photo is from 2014 -- click on it for an enlarged view.

More Information: See our United Artists Theatre pages for more info and photos:
main united artists page  |  exterior outer lobby  |
|   inner lobby  |  lounges  |  upper lobby areas
|
auditorium main floor
mezzanine  |  balcony  |
|
  projection  |  backstage  |   other basement areas  |
attic  |  ace hotel  |  roof  |



For more downtown Los Angeles theatre explorations:

  Visit our Spring Street Theatres  page for
interesting tales of theatres just east of Broadway. 

And don't miss our Main Street Theatres page
for exploration of over 40 theatres! 

See our Theatres West of Broadway page for
a tour of theatres on Hill Street, Olive, Grand and Figueroa.

See you at the movies in Los Angeles!