EXTREME SURVIVAL EQUIPMENT - EXTREME SURVIVAL

EXTREME SURVIVAL EQUIPMENT - COIL HANDLING EQUIPMENT.

Extreme Survival Equipment


extreme survival equipment
    survival equipment
  • Survivalism is a movement of individuals or groups (called survivalists) who are actively preparing for future possible disruptions in local, regional, national, or international social or political order.
    extreme
  • extreme point: the point located farthest from the middle of something
  • Very severe or serious
  • Reaching a high or the highest degree; very great
  • Not usual; exceptional
  • of the greatest possible degree or extent or intensity; "extreme cold"; "extreme caution"; "extreme pleasure"; "utmost contempt"; "to the utmost degree"; "in the uttermost distress"
  • the furthest or highest degree of something; "he carried it to extremes"
extreme survival equipment - Extreme 5-Person
Extreme 5-Person 3-Day Emergency Survival Kit (10500)
Extreme 5-Person 3-Day Emergency Survival Kit (10500)
Special Features: Mobile: Emergency gear kits are packed in a SecurEvac backpack with padded shoulder straps, top carry handle, and sternum strap for stability in motion. Complete: Each disaster gear kit includes key survival supplies for all the basic needs of 30 people. Visible: Bags are designed for quick-find emergency identification and high visibility for safety in use: safety orange markings, 360° high-visibility reflective safety stripes, integrated 3-LED flashing safety signal. Secure: Breakaway tamper-evident closure ties for main compartments keep supplies secure yet accessible in an emergency. Flexible: Emergency supplies can be customized to meet specific needs. Sanitary: Includes Fold-Flat Portable Toilet (holds up to a 275 lbs person), 8 biodegradable waste bags, 8 deodorizer packets and 2 full rolls of toilet paper. Contents: For Mobility and storage: (1) SecurEvac backpack with integrated LED safety signal For search and rescue: (1) pair leather palmed work gloves (1) pair safety goggles (1) pry bar For easier breathing: (30) dust masks For minor medical situations: (1) first aid kit (5) emergency blankets For hydration: (30) Emergency drinking water pouches (4 oz.) [5 year shelf life] For nutrition: (5) 2,400 calorie food bars (60 portions) [5 year shelf life] For shelter: (1) 8' x 10' tarp/ground cover (1) cord For communication and light: (1) whistle with lanyard (1) AM/FM radio with extra batteries (1) flashlight with extra batteries (2) 12-hour light sticks For maintaining proper hygiene and sanitation: (1) Carry-FlatTM portable toilet (6) toilet bags (6) deodorizer packets (2) toilet paper rolls (4) pairs vinyl gloves (30) sanitary towlettes (2) 4 oz bottles hand sanitizer For emergency management: (1) emergency instruction sheet (1) clipboard (1) writing tablet (2) pens (10) tamper-evident breakaway closure ties Dimension & Weight: 14" x 18" x 13", 28 lbs.

75% (19)
Gajeta Falkusa
Gajeta Falkusa
This beauty is a very special boat with a long history…

The name Palagruza is associated not only with the main island of the small group of islands and rocks in the open sea of middle Adriatic, or with the grave of the famous Diomedes, a Greek hero from the Trojan War, but also with a millennium history of navigation across the Adriatic. This is the history of the struggle for survival of the fishermen from Komiza (small town on the Island of Vis) who used to fish sardines in their very special boats built for fishing at Palagruza.

The Palagruza group of islands and rocks consists of two islands, Vela (big) and Mala (small) Palagruza, and 13 rocks. Although the Palagruza is nearer the Italian coast and islands (29 nautical miles [NM] to Monte Gargano and 21.5 NM to the Island of Pianosa) than to the Croatian coast and islands (60 NM to Peljesac and 25 NM to the Is land of Susac) it belongs to Croatia because it was traditionally Komiza’s fishery.

This large area of the open sea in the middle Adriatic is Croatian territorial sea.

Komiza's fishermen used this special boat “falkusa” which was suitable both for open sea sailing and coastal net fishing. Falkusa was a slender, 8-9.5 m long, open vessel with a sharp fore and aft. She was fitted with “falks”, removable planks running from stem to stern, which in creased the height of sides by half a meter, making it possible the cross the open sea from Komiza to Palagruza and back. On arrival to Palagruza, the fishermen would take the “falks” away, making her a low fishing boat. Falkusa had a five member crew and was equipped with 4 oars, removable mast, bowsprit, and 120 m2 of sails (Latin sail and gib)

Between 50 and 100 “falkusa” vessels used to fish near Palagruza, spending there three weeks of dark. In case of sirocco the fishermen had to run their boats ashore at one of the two Palagruza's beaches, where there was not enough space for all of them. They also had to build provisional barracks or use caves to store barrels of salted sardines and equipment.

Who gets the best place at Palagruza was decided by fishermen's regatta, which required strength, extreme endurance and sailing crafts manship. It was probably the longest rowing regatta in the world, taking between 10 and 15 hours of rowing. When there was a favorable mistral, a falkusa could arrive at Palagruza in 5 hours, with sailing a speed of more than 8 knots. The regatta winner was entitled to the best place on the Palagruza beaches, and the other places were taken in the order of arrival. Because it was not possible to keep the boat riding on anchor during strong sirocco, the crews last arriving had to keep rowing their boats for as long as a few days in the shelter of the island.

The fishermen had to take 3 weeks' supplies. Each boat took 25 barrels of salt, 80-100 empty barrels for salting sardines, 5 nets, 4 beams and lifting tackle for pulling out the boat, kit for mending the boat, 2 barrels of water, biscuits, oil, wine, and other provisions. Even fire wood had to be brought to Palagruza. The only medical supply was 2 kg of rice and some chamomile, the remedy in case of diarrhoea.

The last regatta was held in 1936. Engines and modern nets have now completely changed sardine fishing, and Komiza's fishermen have adapted themselves successfully to new fishing methods.

The last falkusa sank during a storm in 1986. Her remains with complete equipment can be seen in Komiza's fishermen museum.

Split, Dalmatia, Croatia
Exakta VX1000 + Meyer Gorlitz Lydith 30/3.5 + Kodak Gold 100 + Hoya polarisation filter
Coral Atoll Discoveries! Part 4
Coral Atoll Discoveries! Part 4
Parts one, two and three are below in the first comment: I'm attempting to put together a company called, "Coral Atoll Discoveries!" The idea is for this company to be an adventure, EXTREME tour-guide photography venture to remote, uninhabited islands in Micronesia. I’m talking off the beaten path, into the South Pacific wilderness!! My associates and I will meet clients in Majuro, Republic of the Marshall Islands; from Majuro, we will board a boat and travel to a specific island(s) to go camping, spear fishing, scuba diving, deep sea fishing and to learn Tropical Islands Survival skills! ;-) Of course photography sessions will be worked into the fun and excitement! All meals will be prepared by Native Islanders from your catch of the day! Some islands will have small bungalows, while others will have nothing but dirt for a tent. Solar power will provide basic lighting and electrical equipment battery charging. Satellite phones will be available however, internet will not be provided until the end of the excursion back in your hotel room. Minimum length of a tour is two days however, there is no maximum tour length; Coral Atoll Discoveries can stay out as long as you can! ;-) If you're interested in a travel package let me know!! Yea…yea, I know…I have so many ideas and plans it’s almost a joke! But know this; one day one of my ideas will fall on the right people and become reality! It’s just a matter of time!!! The above idea may never bear fruit however, I will never give up! The above photo was taken by me on an uninhabited, remote island of Kwajalein Atoll, Republic of the Marshall Islands. I spent a couple days on this island camping with my Marshallese friends.

extreme survival equipment
extreme survival equipment
US Army Technical Manual, ARMY AMMUNITION DATA SHEETS FOR DEMOLITION MATERIALS, TM 43-0001-38, 1994
US Army Technical Manual, ARMY AMMUNITION DATA SHEETS FOR DEMOLITION MATERIALS, TM 43-0001-38, 1994

Purpose
This manual is a reference handbook published as an aid in planning, training, familiarization, and identification of demolition items.

Scope
a. For each item of materiel, there are illustrations
and descriptions together with characteristics
and related data, Included in the
related data are weights, dimensions, performance
data, packing, shipping and storage data,
Classification, and logistics control codes (LCC).

CHAPTER 1 INTRODUTION
1-1 Purpose
1-2 Scope
1-3 Metric Conversion Chart
1-4 Quantity-Distance Classes and Storage Compatibility
Groups
CHAPTER 2. INITIATING AND PRIMING DEVICES
Cap, Blasting, Electric: M6
Cap, Blasting: Nonelectric, M7
Cap, Blasting: Special, Nonelectric, J-1 (Type II)
Cap, Blasting, Electric, Special, J-2 (Type II)
Cap, Blasting: Nonelectric, 30 Foot Shock Tube, Ml1
Cap, Blasting: Nonelectric, 30 Foot Shock Tube,
Ml1 (Inert)
Cap, Blasting: Nonelectric, 500 Foot Shock Tube, M12
Cap, Blasting: Nonelectric, 500 Foot Shock Tube,
M12 (Inert)
Cap, Blasting: Nonelectric, 1000 Foot Shock Tube, M13
Cap, Blasting: Nonelectric, Delay, M14
Cap, Blasting: Nonelectric, Delay, M14 (Inert)
Cap, Blasting: Nonelectric, Delay, M15
Cap, Blasting: Nonelectric, 70 Foot Shock Tube w/Initiator,
M15 (Inert)
Detonator, Percussion: M1A2, 15-Second Delay
Detonator, Friction: 15-Second Delay, M1 or M1A1
Detonator, Friction: 8-Second Delay, M2
Detonator, Percussion: M2A1, 8-Second Delay
Detonator Kit, Concussion: M1
Cord, Detonating
Cord, Detonating: Inert-Reinforced, Dummy
Coupling, Base, Firing Device
Coupling Base, Firing Device: Non-metallic, M2
Coupling Body
Firing Device, Demolition: M1, Release Type
Firing Device, Demolition, M1, Delay
Firing Device, Demolition: M1, Pull Type
Firing Device, Demolition: M5, Pressure Release
Firing Device, Demolition: M122
Firing Devce, Demolition: M142 Multipurpose (Pressure,
Pull Pressure Release, or Tension Release Type)
Firing Device, Demolition: M3, Pull Release Type
Firing Device, Demolition: M1 and M1A1, Pressure Type
Primer, Percussion: Cap, M2
Primer, Percussion: Cap. M27
Fuse, Blasting, Tree: (Safety Fuse)
Fuse, Blasting Time, M700
Fuse, Blasting, Time Inert
Holder: Blasting Cap and Shock Tube M9.
Igniter, Time Blasting Fuse: M1 Fiction
Igniter, Time Blasting Fuse: M2 Weatherproof
Igniter, Time Blasting Fuse: M60, Weatherproof
Igniter, Time Blasting Fuse: M81
ELECTRICAL BLASTING EQUIPMENT
Blasting Machine, M32/M34
Blasting Machine, 10-Cap (Dixson) (Most Recent Model of this Type)
Blasting Machine, 10-Cap Fidelity Type or While Rodgers Type
Blasting Machine, 50-Cap (Most Recently Issued Type)
Blasting Machine, 30-Cap (Generator Type)
Blasting Machine, 50-Cap (Generator Type)
Blasting Machine, 100-Cap (Generator Type)
Test Set, Blasting Cap: M51
Galvanometers, Blasting
Battery, Standard Galvanometer Type BA-245/u
Battery, Low Temperature Galvanometers
CHARGES
Charge, Demolition: Cratering, 40-pound (Three
Generations)
Change, Demolition: Cratering 43-Pound
Charge, Explosive, Springing (for Rod, Earth, Blast Driven, M13)
charge, Propelling, Earth Rod: M12
Dynamite: Military, M1
TNT Block Demolition Charges-Charge, Demolition:
Block (i/4, i/2, 1-Pound) TNT
Destructor, Explosive: Universal, M10
DEMOLITION KITS AND ASSEMBLIES
Charge, Demolition: Assembly M37
Charge, Demolition: Assembly M183
Demolition Kit, Bangalore Torpedo: M1A1 and M1A2
Demolition Equipment Set: Explosive Initiating, Nonelectric
Demolition Equipment Set: Explosive Initiating, Electric and
Nonelectric
Demolition Kit, Projected Charge: Ml and M1A1 (M1E1)
Demolition Kit, Projected Charge: M157
Demolition Kit, Projected Charge: M173
Demolition Kit, Cratering M180-Demolition Kit,
Cratering, Training: M270
Explosive Kit, Earth Rod: Set No. 1

US Army Technical Manual, ARMY AMMUNITION DATA SHEETS FOR DEMOLITION MATERIALS, TM 43-0001-38, 1994

Purpose
This manual is a reference handbook published as an aid in planning, training, familiarization, and identification of demolition items.

Scope
a. For each item of materiel, there are illustrations
and descriptions together with characteristics
and related data, Included in the
related data are weights, dimensions, performance
data, packing, shipping and storage data,
Classification, and logistics control codes (LCC).

CHAPTER 1 INTRODUTION
1-1 Purpose
1-2 Scope
1-3 Metric Conversion Chart
1-4 Quantity-Distance Classes and Storage Compatibility
Groups
CHAPTER 2. INITIATING AND PRIMING DEVICES
Cap, Blasting, Electric: M6
Cap, Blasting: Nonelectric, M7
Cap, Blasting: Special, Nonelectric, J-1 (Type II)
Cap, Blasting, Electric, Special, J-2 (Type II)
Cap, Blasting: Nonelectric, 30 Foot Shock Tube, Ml1
Cap, Blasting: Nonelectric, 30 Foot Shock Tube,
Ml1 (Inert)
Cap, Blasting: Nonelectric, 500 Foot Shock Tube, M12
Cap, Blasting: Nonelectric, 500 Foot Shock Tube,
M12 (Inert)
Cap, Blasting: Nonelectric, 1000 Foot Shock Tube, M13
Cap, Blasting: Nonelectric, Delay, M14
Cap, Blasting: Nonelectric, Delay, M14 (Inert)
Cap, Blasting: Nonelectric, Delay, M15
Cap, Blasting: Nonelectric, 70 Foot Shock Tube w/Initiator,
M15 (Inert)
Detonator, Percussion: M1A2, 15-Second Delay
Detonator, Friction: 15-Second Delay, M1 or M1A1
Detonator, Friction: 8-Second Delay, M2
Detonator, Percussion: M2A1, 8-Second Delay
Detonator Kit, Concussion: M1
Cord, Detonating
Cord, Detonating: Inert-Reinforced, Dummy
Coupling, Base, Firing Device
Coupling Base, Firing Device: Non-metallic, M2
Coupling Body
Firing Device, Demolition: M1, Release Type
Firing Device, Demolition, M1, Delay
Firing Device, Demolition: M1, Pull Type
Firing Device, Demolition: M5, Pressure Release
Firing Device, Demolition: M122
Firing Devce, Demolition: M142 Multipurpose (Pressure,
Pull Pressure Release, or Tension Release Type)
Firing Device, Demolition: M3, Pull Release Type
Firing Device, Demolition: M1 and M1A1, Pressure Type
Primer, Percussion: Cap, M2
Primer, Percussion: Cap. M27
Fuse, Blasting, Tree: (Safety Fuse)
Fuse, Blasting Time, M700
Fuse, Blasting, Time Inert
Holder: Blasting Cap and Shock Tube M9.
Igniter, Time Blasting Fuse: M1 Fiction
Igniter, Time Blasting Fuse: M2 Weatherproof
Igniter, Time Blasting Fuse: M60, Weatherproof
Igniter, Time Blasting Fuse: M81
ELECTRICAL BLASTING EQUIPMENT
Blasting Machine, M32/M34
Blasting Machine, 10-Cap (Dixson) (Most Recent Model of this Type)
Blasting Machine, 10-Cap Fidelity Type or While Rodgers Type
Blasting Machine, 50-Cap (Most Recently Issued Type)
Blasting Machine, 30-Cap (Generator Type)
Blasting Machine, 50-Cap (Generator Type)
Blasting Machine, 100-Cap (Generator Type)
Test Set, Blasting Cap: M51
Galvanometers, Blasting
Battery, Standard Galvanometer Type BA-245/u
Battery, Low Temperature Galvanometers
CHARGES
Charge, Demolition: Cratering, 40-pound (Three
Generations)
Change, Demolition: Cratering 43-Pound
Charge, Explosive, Springing (for Rod, Earth, Blast Driven, M13)
charge, Propelling, Earth Rod: M12
Dynamite: Military, M1
TNT Block Demolition Charges-Charge, Demolition:
Block (i/4, i/2, 1-Pound) TNT
Destructor, Explosive: Universal, M10
DEMOLITION KITS AND ASSEMBLIES
Charge, Demolition: Assembly M37
Charge, Demolition: Assembly M183
Demolition Kit, Bangalore Torpedo: M1A1 and M1A2
Demolition Equipment Set: Explosive Initiating, Nonelectric
Demolition Equipment Set: Explosive Initiating, Electric and
Nonelectric
Demolition Kit, Projected Charge: Ml and M1A1 (M1E1)
Demolition Kit, Projected Charge: M157
Demolition Kit, Projected Charge: M173
Demolition Kit, Cratering M180-Demolition Kit,
Cratering, Training: M270
Explosive Kit, Earth Rod: Set No. 1

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