15. Coin hoards

 Index:

Abdy, Richard Anthony

Title:

Coin hoards from the British Isles 2012 / ed. by Richard Abdy … [et al.]

Source:

British Numismatic Journal 82 (2012) p. 230-244

 

Index:

Allen, Martin R.

Title:

Coin hoards from the British Isles 2013 / ed. by Martin Allen, Eleanor Ghey and John Naylor

Source:

British Numismatic Journal 83 (2013) p. 263-275

 

Index:

Ashton, Richard 1946-

Title:

Ancient and mediaeval coins in Bolvadin (Turkey) / Richard H.J. Ashton, Chris Lightfoot and Adil Özme

Source:

Anatolia Antiqua 8 (2000) p. 171-195, pl. 1-3

 

Index:

Calomino, Dario 1977-

Title:

Le monete del 'castrum' / Dario Calomino

Source:

Ricerche archeologiche a Sant'Andrea di Loppio (Trento, Italia) : il castrum tardo-antico-altomedievale / Barbara Maurina ; con contributi di Ivana Angelini, ... [et al.]. - Oxford : Archaeopress, cop. 2016. - P. 611-625

Abstract:

This paper considers the numismatic evidence from the castrum, which consists of 94 coins dating from the 2nd century BC to the 6th century AD (also including one medieval coin). The importance of Loppio - S. Andrea as a study case lies in the high reliability of most of the stratigraphic contexts, in the large percentage of legible coins (85%) and in the possibility of processing the data in relation with the peculiar typology and function of the site. There also is a very diverse range of coin finds; though the great majority are bronzes or debased radiates, there is a remarkable group of six silver pieces and an exceptional single gold specimen. The proportion of high value denomination issues is higher than average; this strengthens the argument that the site played a strategic military role (and possibly commercial as well) on the road between the Garda district and the Adige Valley. Only a small percentage of the finds (c. 9%) dates back to the phases in which the site was inhabited (not earlier than the second half of the 5th century AD); this suggests that late Roman coins (making up over 73% of the total) still played an important role in early Medieval times. Because the site yielded no evidence of a Roman occupation, it seems more plausible to account them as part of the small change in use during the 6th century rather than merely as residual material. This also seems to be confirmed by the fact that most of these finds belong to the same stratigraphic contexts such as Ostrogothic coins. A significant number of the small Roman bronzes (9 or 10) were intentionally pierced. The practice of using pierced coins (both in bronze and in precious metal) for producing ornamentation is widely attested within grave goods in Lombard cemeteries. All the specimens found at Loppio come from the latest structures of the castrum, which can be dated to the 7th century AD, confirming that they were in use during the Lombard phase of the site. What is very unusual about this sample is that the objects to which these pierced coins were supposed to belong do not come from graves but from habitation contexts. Such evidence suggests that, regardless of their final function for ritual or ornamental-symbolic purposes (necklace-bracelet pendants, amulets, talismans), these coins were used in everyday life, thus they could have also retained their basic function as a medium of exchange. The most remarkable single find from the castrum of Loppio is a gold tremissis struck by the mint of Rome in the name of Justinian I. This piece reveals a copper core beneath the gold surface, it being one of the very few plated gold specimens known at present. The rarity of these counterfeits seems to indicate that they were made on a small scale. For this reason, it is very difficult to determine in which circumstances the coin was produced. The prototype appears to be Byzantine. It could either be an ‘emergency’ issue by the Imperial mint to face an extraordinary demand for coinage during the Gothic War, or (although less likely) an ‘unofficial’ counterfeit.

 

Index:

Doménech Belda, Carolina

Title:

Las monedas del Tolmo de Minateda, Hellín (Albacete) / Carolina Doménech Belda y Sonia Gutiérrez Lloret

Source:

XIII Congreso Internacional de Numismática, Madrid, 2003 : actas = proceedings = actes. II / ed. por Carmen Alfaro, Carmen Marcos y Paloma Otero. - Madrid : Ministerio de Cultura, Subdirección General de Publicaciones, Información y Documentación, 2005. - P. 1567-1576

 

Index:

Doyen, Jean-Marc 1954-

Title:

Les monnaies gauloises, romaines et médiévales : une approche quantitative et contextuelle / Jean-Marc Doyen

Source:

Reims, Marne, Zac du Vieux Port, bd. Henrot : Aménagements antiques et médiévaux en bord de Vesle (Ie-Ves. et XIVe-XVes.). Vol. 1: Résultats / sous la dir. de Phillippe Rollet. - Metz : Inrap Grand Est Nord, 2015. - (Rapport de fouille). - P. 588-638

 

Index:

Drost, Vincent

Title:

Les monnaies de Javols / Vincent Drost et Michel Amandry

Source:

Javols-Anderitum (Lozère) chef-lieu de la cité des Gabales : une ville romaine de moyenne montagne : bilan de 13 ans d'évaluation et de recherche, 1996-2008 / sous la dir. d'Alain Trintignac, Emmanuel Marot, Alain Ferdière ; avec la collab. de Claudine Allag ... [et al.]. - Montagnac :  Éd. Mergoil, 2011. - (Archéologie et histoire romaine ; 21). - P. 449-478

 

Index:

Farhi, Yoav 1974-

Title:

Coins from the rock shelters and fortified enclosure of Mt. Nitai, eastern Lower Galilee / Yoav Farhi and Uzi Leibner

Source:

Studies in memory of Dan Barag / ed. by: Robert Deutsch and Boaz Zissu. - Jerusalem : Israel Numismatic Journal, 2014. - (Israel Numismatic Journal ; vol. 18). - P. 184-197

Abstract:

Twelve coins from Mt. Nitai (near Tiberias) are discussed here; six of them found on the plateau and six in the cliffside caves. Two are gold, two are silver, one is lead, and the rest  are bronze. The coins range in date from the last third of the fourth century BCE to the seventeenth century CE.

 

Index:

Moorhead, Sam

Title:

The ancient and early mediaeval coins from the Triconch Palace at Butrint, c. 2nd century BC-c. AD 600 / T. Sam N. Moorhead

Source:

Numismatic Chronicle 167 (2007) p. 287-304

Abstract:

This paper covers the coins excavated in the Trinconch Palace at Butrint, most of which were nummi from the 4th to 6th centuries AD.

 

Index:

Moorhead, Sam

Title:

The coins from the excavations at Tel Jezreel (Israel) / Sam Moorhead

Source:

Numismatic Chronicle 168 (2008) p. 453-474

Abstract:

This article covers the Greek, Roman Provincial, Roman Imperial, Byzantine, Crusader, Islamic and Modern coins found at the excavations at Tel Jezreel between 1990 and 1996.

 

Index:

Newton, Douglas P.

Title:

Found coins as indicators of coins in circulation : testing some assumptions / Douglas P. Newton

Source:

European Journal of Archaeology 9 (2006) 2-3 p. 211-227

Abstract:

Coin finds are used to inform discussion about coins in circulation and, hence, economic activity. This discussion often rests on the assumption that patterns in finds of accidentally lost coins mirror to a useful extent those of the coins in circulation at the time. Whenever possible, such assumptions should be tested. This study does this empirically with data from a known coinage. Conditional support was found for the assumption. There is also some evidence that coin size and denomination can affect the coin record but these variables did not add significantly to predictions about coins in circulation based only on the numbers of coins found. Some conditions and precautions are suggested when using the assumption and some uses of data based on accidentally lost coins are discussed.

 

Index:

Pelsdonk, Jan Egbert Leendert 1971-

Title:

Verloren verleden : de noodzaak van vondstregistratie / Jan Pelsdonk

Source:

De Beeldenaar 35 (2011) 5 p. 199-204

Abstract:

The importance of recording coin finds. Dutch hoards of the last years are less or not acessible for research.

 

Index:

Tekin, Oğuz 1958-

Title:

Coins from Allianoi excavations : campaign of 2001 / Oğuz Tekin et Aliye Erol-Özdizbay

Source:

Anatolia Antiqua 23 (2016) p. 117-146

Abstract:

The article covers the coins unearthed during the 2001 campaign. They range from Hellenistic to Ottoman Empire.

 

Index:

Ünal, Erdal

Title:

Greek, Roman, Byzantine, Medieval and Islamic coins from the excavations at  Kyme, Aioles, 1951-1954 / Erdal Ünal

Source:

Numismatic Chronicle 196 (2009) p. 407-423