15. Coin hoards

Index:

Alchomari, M. Alaa Aldin

Title:

Trésor de Buseyra (Karkisiya) / M. Alaa Aldin Alchomari

Source:

The 3rd Simone Assemani symposium on Islamic coins / ed. by Bruno Callegher and Arianna D'Ottone. - Trieste : EUT, 2012. - (Polymnia ; 3). - P. 114-127

 

Index:

Bresc, Cécile 1974-

Title:

Quseir al-Qadim : a hoard of Islamic coins from the Ayyubid period / Cécile Bresc

Source:

Revue Numismatique 164 (2008) p. 407-436

Abstract:

The rich Quseir Hoard, discovered in the sebakh of a wealthy Islamic building, consists of 593 gold and silver coins from the 2th and 3th centuries. The hoard, dated from the last year of the reign of the Ayyubid Sultan al-Kamil, is characterized by the abundant presence of Egyptian debased silver coins, called after their shape either black or globular dirhams. The Quseir hoard provides new evidence about their wide spectrum of weight's dispersion. The hoard includes also 5 Syrian dirhams, testifying of the full integration of Quseir within the Ayyubid monetary trail.

 

Index:

Dolley, Reginald Hugh Michael 1926-1983

Title:

A mythical West Cork find of a gold coin of the Spanish Umayyads / by R.H.M. Dolley

Source:

Journal of the Cork Historical and Archaeological Society 67 (1962) p. 51-53

 

Index:

Horsnæs, Helle Winge

Title:

Changing hands: the Skovsholm ‘dirham’ hoard / Helle  Horsnæs

Source:

The world in the Viking Age / ed. by Søren M. Sindbæk & Athena Trakadas. - Roskilde : The Viking Ship Museum in Roskilde, 2014. - P. 65

 

Index:

Miles, George Carpenter 1904-1975

Title:

Excavation coins from the Persepolis region / by George C. Miles

Series:

Numismatic notes and monographs ; no. 143

Published:

New York : American Numismatic Society, 1959

 

Index:

Naismith, Rory George Robert

Title:

Islamic coins from Early Medieval England / Rory Naismith

Source:

Numismatic Chronicle 165 (2005) p. 193–222

 

Index:

Rispling, Gert 1942-

Title:

Mynten i Sundvedafyndet / Gert Rispling

Source:

Situne Dei (2012) p. 56-62

Abstract:

Sweden has produced 86,000 Oriental coins from the Islamic Caliphate and adjacent territories. They have been found on the islands of Gotland (78%), Öland (7%), and the Swedish mainland (15%). Uppland stands out as the richest province on the mainland (3%). The hoard found in 2008 in Sundveda, Odensala parish, Uppland, contains 482 coins (108 whole and 374 fragments). The most recent legible coin dates to 229 AH (AD 843/44). The time of deposition is estimated as c. 850–60 or slightly later. The Sundveda coins span a considerable date range and come from a large number of mints, which is a typical feature of Viking-Age hoards in Scandinavia. In this hoard, the 8th century coins predominate with a considerable contribution of even older coins. These include the oldest coin type yet found in Viking-Age material (apart from Roman deniers), namely a drachm struck in AD 474–84 for the Sasanian emperor Peroz. The most recent coins are more interesting from a find analysis perspective, but are unfortunately less numerous. Many Viking-Age hoards have weak chronological outer limits. The Sundveda hoard is no exception. The coins were circulating for a considerable period of time and new coins added. Four groups of coins can be dated to the final decade of the hoard: Abbasid dirhams (Ab2, 3.9%), North African imitation dirhams (ImAfr, 1.5%), Khazar imitations (ImKz1, 0.8%), and a Carolingian penny (0.2%). However, most of the later coins cannot be exactly dated. Several Ab2 dirhams are blank or almost blank, being struck from worn dies, making reading of the mint or year impossible. The two groups of imitations are extremel interesting, but of course cannot be dated to an exact year. All the Pahlavi drachms come from the area of present-day Iran. The Islamic dirhams originate from the following countries: Spain, Morocco, Tunisia, Syria, Iraq, Turkey, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Iran, Turkmenistan Afghanistan, and Uzbekistan. The Khazar imitations originate from Russia (Itil? Sarkel?) and the Carolingian penny from Western Europe.