04. Propaganda, ideology

Index:

Alföldi, Andreas 1895-1981

Title:

La divinisation de César dans la politique d'Antoine et d'Octavien entre 44 et 40 avant J.-C / André Alföldi

Source:

Revue Numismatique 6e sér. 15 (1973) p. 99-128

 

Index:

Arslan, Ermanno A. 1940-

Title:

La monetazione di lusso nell'Impero : propaganda, eccellenza artistica, tesaurizzazione / Ermanno Arslan

Source:

Luxus: il piacere della vita nella Roma imperiale : [Torino, Museo di antichita, 26 settembre 2009-31 gennaio 2010] / [a cura di Elena Fontanella]. - [Roma] : Istituto poligrafico e Zecca dello Stato, 2009. – P. 92-99, 509

 

Index:

Assenmaker, Pierre

Title:

'Roma restituta' : la rappresentazione dei fondamenti politici e religiosi della rivolta contro Nerone nelle coniazioni monetarie anonime del 68 d.C. / Pierre Assenmaker

Source:

Il princeps romano : autocrate o magistrato? : fattori giuridici e fattori sociali del potere imperiale da Augusto a Commodo / a cura di Jean-Louis Ferrary, John Scheid. - Pavia : IUSS Press, 2015. - P. 203-238

 

Index:

Beckmann, Martin 1971-

Title:

The significance of Roman imperial coin types / Martin Beckmann

Source:

Klio 91 (2009) 1 p. 144-161

Abstract:

Did Roman Imperial coin types have significant news or propaganda content, or were they generic? This article (focussing on the coinage of Trajan) argues that this depends on what part of the coinage is considered. The gold and bronze coins had substantial news content, but the silver coinage generally did not. This situation arose because two factors, sometimes conflicting, governed the choice of coin types in Trajan’s mint: first, the desire to select topical images; second, the need to maintain uninterrupted the mass-production of coins. As a result, the lower-volume portions of the coinage were adorned with more up-to-date types, and these were changed often; the higher-volume coinage on the other hand,especially the silver denarii, tended to employ generic and outdated types.

 

Index:

Berthold, Angela

Title:

Vom Wert der Nachahmung : Münzen als Massenmedien / Angela Berthold und Bernhard Weisser

Source:

Reproduktion : Techniken und Ideen von der Antike bis heute ; eine Einführung / hrsg. von Jörg Probst. - Berlin : Reimer, 2011. - P. 212-229

 

Index:

Borgerud, Charlotte

Title:

Et tu Brute ? : myntens användning som propagandamedel under den romerska senrepubliken / Charlotte Borgerud

Series:

Uppsala University Coin Cabinet working papers ; 5

Published:

Uppsala : Uppsala University, 2011

 

Index:

Boruch, Wojciech

Title:

Galba's propaganda motifs on Vespasian's coins / Wojciech Boruch

Source:

Notae Numismaticae 1 (1996) p. 74-81

 

Index:

Brennan, Peter

Title:

Faces of power : imperial portraiture on Roman coins / Peter Brennan, Michael Turner & Nicholas L. Wright

Published:

Sydney : Nicholson Museum, University of Sydney, cop. 2007

 

Index:

Caccamo Caltabiano, Maria

Title:

La moneta e la rappresentazione gerarchica del potere / Maria Caccamo Caltabiano

Source:

XIII Congreso Internacional de Numismática, Madrid, 2003 : actas = proceedings = actes. I / ed. por Carmen Alfaro, Carmen Marcos y Paloma Otero. - Madrid : Ministerio de Cultura, Subdirección General de Publicaciones, Información y Documentación, 2005. - P. 535-544

 

Index:

Calomino, Dario 1977-

Title:

Emperor or god? : the posthumous commemoration of Augustus in Rome and the provinces / by Dario Calomino

Published:

London : Royal Numismatic Society, 2015

Note:

Offprint from: Numismatic Chronicle 175 (2015) p. 57-82, pl. 4-8

 

Index:

Cheung, Ada

Title:

The political significance of Roman imperial coin types / Ada Cheung

Source:

Schweizer Münzblätter 191 (Dezember 1998) p. 53-61

 

Index:

Claes, Liesbeth 1985-

Title:

Coins with power? : imperial and local messages on the coinage of the usurpers of the second half of the third century (AD 253-285) / Liesbeth Claes

Source:

Jaarboek voor Munt- en Penningkunde 102 (2015) p. 15-60

Abstract:

The third century is known for its many usurpers. Ancient and modern writers perceive them as direct opponents of the imperial throne. The author compares the iconography on the coins of these usurpers (AD 235-285) in order to trace what political ambitions they advertised. The analysis points out that the coin types did not always represent the usurpers as direct rivals to the imperial throne. On some coin types, the lack of imperial titles and the focus on regional elements hint more at purely regional claims or the ambition of becoming a local imperial deputy. The increase of 'imperial messaging' on coin types can reveal when imperial aspirations of local chieftains started to grow. This often meant the end of their leadership. The article demonstrates how coinage remains an invaluable source to reconstruct the institutional crisis of the third century, and how ideas of regional particularism may gradually have triggered the later tetrarchic division of the Empire.

 

Index:

Evans, Jane DeRose 1956-

Title:

Roman Republican coin types and familial propaganda / Jane De Rose Evans

Published:

London : International Association of Professional Numismatists, 1986

Note:

Offprint from: Proceedings of the 10th International Congress of Numismatics = Actes du 10ème Congrès international de numismatique / ed. by I.A. Carradice ; with P. Attwood ... [et al.]. - London : International Association of Professional Numismatists, cop. 1989. - (Special Publication / International Association of Professional Numismatists ; no. 11). – P. 143-146

 

Index:

Găzdac, Cristian Anton 1970-

Title:

Trajan's Column versus numismatic programme : prototypes in the Trajanic imperial ideology / Cristian Găzdac

Source:

Journal of Ancient History and Archaeology 4 (2017) 1 p. 99-111, pl. 1-6

Abstract:

Using comparative analysis between scenes on Traja's Column and certain coin types, the paper identifies that numismatic sources have served in many cases to design images on the Column. The powerful meaning of symbols on coins – with a long-established tradition – was well used by the sculptors of the Column as it had a strong impact on the audience.

 

Index:

Hekster, Olivier Joram 1974-

Title:

Beelden van macht / Olivier Hekster

Published:

[Nijmegen] : Radboud Universiteit Nijmegen, [2005]

 

Index:

Hekster, Olivier Joram 1974-

Title:

Coins and messages : audience targeting on coins of different denominations? / by Olivier Hekster

Source:

The representation and perception of Roman imperial power : proceedings of the third workshop of the international network Impact of empire (Roman Empire, c. 200 B.C.-A.D. 476), Netherlands Institute in Rome, March 20-23, 2002 / ed. by Lukas de Blois ... [et al.]. - Amsterdam : Gieben, 2003. - P. 20-35

 

Index:

Hekster, Olivier Joram 1974-

Title:

Heersende beelden : Romeinse keizers en hun voorgangers op munten en andere media / door Olivier Hekster ; [red. Paul Beliën, Jaco Zuijderduijn]

Series:

Van Gelder-lezing ; 10

Published:

Utrecht : Geldmuseum, cop. 2011

 

Index:

Hekster, Olivier Joram 1974-

Title:

Nero's ancestry and the construction of imperial ideology in the early empire : a methodological case study / Olivier Hekster … [et al.]

Source:

Ancient History and Archaeology 1 (2014) 4 p. 7-24

Abstract:

Within the discipline of ancient history, diverse types of sources, such as coins, inscriptions, portraits and texts, are often combined to create a coherent image of a particular ruler. A good example of how such a process works is the way in which reconstructions by modern scholars of the emperor Nero tend to look for a clearly defined ‘Neronian image’, by bringing together various types of primary evidence without paying sufficient attention to these sources’ medial contexts. This article argues that such a reconstruction does not do justice to the complex and multi-layered image of the last Julio-Claudian. By focusing on one particular aspect of Neronian imagery, the propagation of this emperor’s ancestry, we will argue that different types of sources, stemming from varying contexts and addressing different groups, cannot unproblematically be combined. Through an investigation of the ancestral messages spread by imperial and provincial coins, epigraphical evidence and portraiture, it becomes clear that systematic analysis of ancient media,their various contexts and inconsistencies is needed before combining them. Such an analysis reveals patterns within the different sources and shows that, in creating imperial images, rulers were constrained by both medial and local traditions. Modern studies of ancient images should therefore take these medial and geographical variety into account in order to do justice to the the multi-faceted phenomenon of imperial representation.

 

Index:

Kraft, Konrad 1920-1970

Title:

Die Taten der Kaiser Constans und Constantius II. / Konrad Kraft

Source:

Jahrbuch für Numismatik und Geldgeschichte 9 (1958) p. 141-186, pl. 12-13

 

Index:

Noreña, Carlos F. 1970-

Title:

Coins and communication / Carlos F. Noreña

Source:

The Oxford handbook of social relations in the Roman world / ed. by Michael Peachin. - Oxford : Oxford University Press, 2011. (Oxford handbooks). - P. 248-268

Abstract:

This article studies how Roman coinage served as a communication medium in the Roman world. The term “Roman coinage” refers to all coins that were minted in areas under the administrative control of the Roman Empire. It notes the two features that distinguished ancient coins from other types of money, namely their adherence to a standard, and the fact that they had designs that indicated a minting authority. The article also looks at the coinages produced under the authority of the central state, and those produced under the local authority in the Roman provinces. These coinages were called the “Roman imperial coinage” and the “Roman provincial coinage”.

 

Index:

Pangerl, Andreas

Title:

Rivalität unter Brüdern : Caracalla und Geta in der Münzpropaganda / Andreas Pangerl, [Bernhard Weisser]

Published:

Mainz : Verlag des Römisch-Germanischen Zentralmuseums, 2012

Note:

Offprint from: Bürgerrecht und Krise : die 'Constitutio Antoniniana' 212 n. Chr. und ihre innenpolitischen Folgen : Begleitbuch zur Ausstellung im Römisch-Germanischen Zentralmuseum 20. September 2012 bis 1. Januar 2013 / Barbara Pferdehirt, Markus Scholz, Hrsg. ; mit Beitr. von Timothy Barnes ... [et al.]. - Mainz : Verlag des Römisch-Germanischen Zentralmuseums, 2012. - (Mosaiksteine ; 9). - P. 21-29, 91-92

 

Index:

Szidat, Joachim 1938-

Title:

Zur Wirkung und Aufnahme der Münzpropaganda (Iul. Misop. 355 d) / von Joachim Szidat

Source:

Museum Helveticum 38 (1981) p. 23-33

 

Index:

Vitale, Marco

Title:

Personifikationen von ‘provinciae’ auf den Münzprägungen unter Hadrian : auf den ikonographischen Spuren von 'Statthalterprovinzen' und 'Teilprovinzen' / Marco Vitale

Source:

Klio 94 (2012) 1 p. 156-174

Abstract:

The reliefs of the Sebasteion in Aphrodisias or of the porticus ad nationes in Rome, with their militaristic, triumphal representational context, explicitly aim to show ἔϑνη or gentes/nationes. In contrast to this, the personifications on Hadrian’s coin series carry names of places that can all be shown to be designations of administrative regional units. The Emperor’s journeys of inspection throughout his realm provide the representational context. On the one hand, provinciae in the sense of comprehensive governor’s provinces, such as Asia or Dacia, are referred to. Identically named governor’s provinces, such as the three provinciae called Dacia or the three provinciae called Hispania, are simply referred to in a standard abbreviation by the shared part of their name, the blanket 'Dacia' or 'Hispania' respectively. On the other hand, provinciae in the narrower sense of the word as Greek παρχίαι, i.e. provinces respectively procuratorial areas on an administrative level below that of the governor, also appear. This can be seen in the coin legends Phrygia or Libya. This concept of imperial geography is not new, at least not in the history of Roman coinage. The administrative geographical view of conquered regions takes on concrete form during the reign of Trajan at the latest, at least in the coinages showing the personified DACIA PROVINCIA. The place name Dacia and its personification now naturally was taken to stand for the territorially defined administrative area of that name, and represented neither the eponymous landscape nor an ethnos.

 

Index:

Weiser, Wolfram

Title:

Relicium temporum reparatio : Kaiser Constans führt gefangene Franken aus ihren Dörfern ab / Wolfram Weiser

Source:

Schweizerische Numismatische Rundschau 66 (1987) p. 161-174, pls. 28-30

 

Index:

Weisser, Bernhard 1964-

Title:

Ahnenkult in der Römischen Republik : die Münzemissionen des Marcus Iunius Brutus / Bernhard Weisser

Source:

Der 'Brutus' vom Kapitol : ein Porträt macht Weltgeschichte / für die Antikensammlung der Staatlichen Museen zu Berlin hrsg. von Agnes Schwarzmaier. - München : Minerva, cop. 2010. - P. 112-119

Abstract:

Aus den Münztypen mit Bezug auf Marcus Iunius Brutus ergibt sich das Bild eines Mannes, der dem Vorbild der Ahnen Lucius Iunius Brutus und C. Sevilius Ahala so sehr verpflichtet war, dass sein Schicksal als Tyrannenmörder nahezu zwangsläufig wurde. Apollon hatte dem Vorfahren die Fürsorge für das Römische Volk zugewiesen. Der delphische Gott blieb der Schutzpatron der Familie und des jüngsten Sprosses, dem es auferlegt war, ein weiteres Mal die Republik zu retten. Es fehlte nur ein König, den es zu stürzen galt. Gaius Iulius Caesar fiel diese Rolle zu. Generationen zuvor wäre es vielleicht ein Marius, ein Sulla oder ein Pompeius gewesen, kurze Zeit später Marcus Antonius oder Augustus. Das Vorbild des Lucius Iunius Brutus schien für die gesamte Partei der Caesarmörder, und zwar auch diejenigen mit weniger idealistischen Motiven, geeignet zu sein, die politischen Ziele zu verkörpern. Das Ansehen des Lucius Iunius Brutus hat die Niederlage der Caesarmörder bei Philippi 42 v. Chr. und den Tod seines letzten Abkömmlings offensichtlich unbeschadet überstanden. Marcus Iunius Brutus blieb eine Episode, das Bild des Ahnen aber überdauerte. Lucius Iunius Brutus fand seinen Platz in der Ahnengalerie des Augustus auf dem Augustusforum, in der annalistischen Geschichtsschreibung des Titus Livius, der vergleichenden Biographie des Plutarch und vieler anderer kaiserzeitlicher Autoren. Mit der Wiederentdeckung des antiken Erbes in der Renaissance wurde er wieder zum Paradigma, das zum vielzitieren Kanon des Bildungsgutes gehörte, bis er am Ende des 18. Jahrhunderts in der französischen Revolution wiederum als Vorbild für die junge Republik diente.

 

Index:

Weisser, Bernhard 1964-

Title:

Germanicus Caesar : zur Inszenierung eines Nachkommen im Medium der Münzen zwischen 4 und 19 n. Chr. / Bernhard Weisser

Source:

Ich Germanicus : Feldherr, Priester, Superstar / Stefan Burmeister und Joseph Rottmann (Hrsg.). - Darmstadt : Theiss, 2015. - (Archäologie in Deutschland. Sonderheft ; 8). - P. 98-104

 

Index:

Weisser, Bernhard 1964-

Title:

Roman imperial imagery of time and cosmos / Bernhard Weisser ; transl. by Orla Mulholland

Source:

Time and cosmos in Greco-Roman Antiquity / Alexander R. Jones (ed.). - Princeton : Princeton University Press, 2016. - P. 171-183

Abstract:

We would hardly expect to find on coins or other official images of Rome records of popular belief aside from the state religion. This applies equally to salvation religions such as Christianity and to occult magical practices such as curse spells. Thus, when astrological signs or personifications of time are reproduced on coins, questions immediately arise regarding the images’ functions and the intention behind their presentation. Answers to these questions will be illuminated through three examples, which at the same time offer insights into how the Romans dealt with this topic.

 

Index:

Weisser, Bernhard 1964-

Title:

Szenen des Triumphes auf republikanischen Münzen / Bernhard Weisser

Source:

Minda Numismatica (2005) p. 165-180