Dannagal G.Young, Ph.D. 

Curriculum Vitae



Associate Professor of Communication at the University of Delaware

Studying Media, Politics, Cognitive Psychology and Political Entertainment since 1999.


Education

PhD in Communication (2007)  from the Annenberg School for Communication at the University of Pennsylvania. Dissertation:  The Psychology of Satire:  Political humor and the construction of political candidates and issues (Advisor: J. N. Cappella)

MA in Communication (2001) Annenberg School for Communication at the University of Pennsylvania

BA in Political Science and French (1998) University of New Hampshire. Summa Cum Laude.


Areas of academic research

Normative and cognitive implications of political satire and other non-traditional sources of political information

The intersection of entertainment and information, particularly the psychology of political satire and its role in the political world.

Digital technologies, social media, and the mobilization of citizen politics.



Publications

LaMarre, H. L, Landreville, K. D., & Young, D. G.  (2014). Humor Works in Funny Ways: Examining Satirical Tone as a Key Determinant in Political Humor Message Processing.  Mass Communication & Society, 17, 400 - 423.

Brewer, P., Young, D. G., & Jones, P. E. (2013).
Campaign News Genres, Audience Characteristics, and Media Perceptions: A Field Experiment. Electronic News, 7, 189 - 203.

Young, D. G.,
Holbert, R. L., & Jamieson, K. H. (2014
).  Successful Practices for the Strategic use of Political Parody and Satire:  Lessons from the P6 Symposium and the 2012 Election Campaign. American Behavioral Scientist, Election Issue 58, 1111 - 1130.

Brewer, P. R., Young, D. G., Morreale, M. (2013
). The Impact of Real News about “Fake News”: Intertextual Processes and Political Satire. International Journal of Public Opinion Research, 25, 323 - 343.

Jones, P. E., Hoffman, L. H., & Young, D. G.  (2013). Online emotional appeals and political participation: The effect of candidate affect on mass behavior.  New Media & Society, 5, 1132 -  1150. PDF.

Young, D. G. (2014). Theories and Effects of Political Humor:  Discounting Cues, Gateways, and the Impact of Incongruities. In K. Kenski and K. H. Jamieson (Eds.), Handbook of Political Communication Theories.  Oxford University Press.

Hoffman, L. H., Jones, P. E., & Young, D. G. (2013). Does My Comment Count? Perceptions of Political Participation in an Online Environment. Computers in Human Behavior. 29, 2248 - 2256. PDF.

Young, D. G.  (2013). Laughter, Learning, or Enlightenment? Viewing and Aviodance Motivations behind The Daily Show and The Colbert Report.  Journal of Broadcasting and Electronic Media, 57, 153 - 169.PDF.

Young, D. G. (2013). Lighten Up: How Satire will Make American Politics Relevant Again. The Columbia Journalism Review. July/Aug. URL: http://www.cjr.org/cover_story/lighten_up.php

Young, D. G. & Gray, J. (2013). Breaking Boundaries: Working Across the Methodological and Epistemological Divide in the Study of Political Entertainment. International Journal of Communication, Breaking Boundaries Special Section, 7, 552 - 555. PDF.

Young, D. G.  (2013). Political Satire and Occupy Wall Street: How Comics Co-opted Strategies of the Protest Paradigm to Legitimize a Movement. International Journal of Communication, Breaking Boundaries Special Section, 7, 371 - 393. PDF.

Holbert, R. L. & Young, D. G. (2013). Exploring relations between political entertainment media and traditional political communication information outlets: A research agenda. In E. Scharrer (Ed.), The International Encyclopedia of Media Studies: Media Effects / Media Psychology Volume 5. Hoboken, NJ: Wiley-Blackwell. PDF.

Young, D. G. (2012). Entertainment, Satire, and the Big Questions or our Political World. In R. Glover and D. Tagliarina (Eds.), Teaching Politics Beyond the Book: Film, Texts, and New Media in the Classroom (pp. 179 - 198). New York: Continuum Publishers. PDF.

Young, D. G. & Hoffman, L. H. (2012). Acquisition of Current Events Knowledge from Political Satire Programming: An Experimental Approach. Atlantic Journal of Communication, 20, 290 - 304. PDF.

Esralew, S. & Young, D. G. (2012). The Influence of Parodies on Mental Models: Exploring the Tina Fey-Sarah Palin Phenomenon, Communication Quarterly, 60, 338 - 352. PDF.

Young, D. G. (2012). A Flip-Flopper and a Dumb Guy Walk into a Bar: Political humor and Priming in the 2004 Campaign, HUMOR: The International Journal of Humor Research. 25, 215-231. PDF.


Young, D. G. (2011). Political Entertainment and the Press' Construction of Sarah Feylin. Popular Communication, 9, 1-15. PDF.

Young, D. G. & Esralew, S. (2011). Jon Stewart a heretic? Surely you jest: Political Participation and Discussion  Among Viewers of Late-night Comedy Programming,  In A. Amarasinga (Ed). The Stewart/Colbert Effect:  Essays on the Real Impact of Fake News.  (pp. 99 - 116). Jefferson, NC: McFarland and Co. Publishers.

Hoffman, L. H. & Young, D. G. (2011). Satire, punch lines, and the nightly news: Untangling media effects on political participation. Communication Research Reports 28(2) 159 — 168. PDF.

Young, D. G. (2011). [Review of From Cronkite to Colbert: The Evolution of Broadcast News by Geoffrey Baym]. Political Communication, 28(1) 135-138. Link to article.

 

Young, D. G. (2010). Political Humor, The Encyclopedia of Political Science, CQ Press.

 

Hoffman, L. H., & Young, D. G. (2010). Political communication survey research: Challenges, trends, and opportunities. In E. Bucy and L. Holbert (Eds.), The Sourcebook for Political Communication Research: Methods, Measures, and Analytical Techniques. Routledge. PDF.

Young, D. G. & Caplan, S. E. (2010). Online dating and Conjugal Bereavement, Death Studies, 34, 575 - 605. Link to article online.

Polk, J. Young, D. G. & Holbert, R. L (2009). Humor Complexity and Political Influence:  An elaboration likelihood approach to the effects of humor type in The Daily Show with Jon Stewart, Atlantic Journal of Communication, 17(4), 202 - 219. Link to article online.

Feldman, L. & Young, D. G. (2008). Late-night comedy as a gateway to traditional news: An analysis of time trends in news attention among late-night comedy viewers during the 2004 Presidential primaries, Political Communication, 25(4), 401-422. PDF

Young, D. G. (2008). The privileged role of the late-night joke: Exploring humor’s role in disrupting argument scrutiny, Media Psychology, 11, 119 - 142. PDF

Young, D. G. (2008). The Daily Show as new journalism. In J. S. Morris & J. C. Baumgartner (Eds.), Laughing Matters: Humor and American Politics in the Media Age. (pp. 241-259).New York: Routledge. PDF

Young, D. G. & Tisinger, R. (2006). Dispelling late-night myths:  News consumption among late-night comedy viewers and the predictors of exposure to various late-night shows, International Journal of Press/Politics, 11, 113-134. PDF.

Young, D. G., Tisinger, R., Kenski, K, & Romer, D. (2006) “The Power of Numbers:  Examining Subpopulations with the NAES.”  In  D. Romer, K. Kenski, C. Adasiewicz and K. H. Jamieson (Eds.) (2nd Ed.)  Capturing Campaign Dynamics.  The National Annenberg Election Survey:  Design, Method, and Data.  Oxford University Press. 

 

Young, D. G. (2006). Late-night comedy and the salience of the candidates’ caricatured traits in the 2000 election, Mass Communication and Society, 9, 339–366. PDF

Young, D. G. (2004). Late-night comedy in election 2000: Its influence on candidate trait ratings and the moderating effects of political knowledge and partisanship, Journal of Broadcasting and Electronic Media, 48, 1-22.  PDF

Young, D. G. (2004). Sacrifice, consumption, and the American way of life: Advertising and domestic propaganda during World War II,   The Communication Review, 8, 27-52. PDF


Honors & Awards

2010 Keynote Speaker at Tennessee Tech's Constitution Day Celebration on the topic of Political Satire and Political Humor in a Democratic Society.

2009 Recipient of Excellence in Teaching Award from Alpha Lambda Delta National Honor Society at the University of Delaware

2009 Nominated for University of Delaware's Excellence in Teaching Award

2008 Recipient of University of Delaware's GUR grant to fund research

2008 Nominated for University of Delaware's Excellence in Teaching Award

2007 Recipient of travel award from the University of Delaware's Center for International Studies to attend the 2007 Annual Meeting of the International Association for Mass Communication Researchers in Paris, France.

2005 Selected as a Graduate Fellow of the American Academy of Political and Social Science by the University of Pennsylvania’s Annenberg School for Communication.

2004 Winner of Seymour Sudman Student Paper Competition at the Annual Meeting of the American Association for Public Opinion Research, Phoenix, AZ, 13-16 May, 2004.

2003 Recognized by the Instructional and Developmental Division of the International Communication Association for “Excellent Teaching by a Graduate Student” at the Annenberg School for Communication, University of Pennsylvania.

2002 Second Place in Student Paper Competition of the Entertainment Studies Interest Group, Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication, Miami, FL, 7-10 August, 2002.

1998 Caroline Gross Award for oustanding achievement in political science at the University of New Hampshire

1997 Phi Beta Kappa


Popular Press

Ellingboe, Meggan (2012). Politics and Popular Culture, Midmorning Live, Minnesota Public Radio, January 20. http://minnesota.publicradio.org/display/web/2012/01/20/midmorning1
 
Black, Debra (2012).  Daily Show Viewers are Deep, Study Says. Toronto Star, January 10. http://www.thestar.com/article/1113350

Howard, Jen (2011). FlackCheck.org: Using Comedy to Combat lies in Politics. WHYY’s Newsworks.org. Aired during NPR’s Morning Edition, November 9. http://www.newsworks.org/index.php/delaware/item/29580-flackcheckorg-using-comedy-to-combat-lies-in-politics

Moe, John (2011). FlackCheck: Separating Facts from Politicsl Malarkey. Marketplace Tech Report. December 5. http://www.marketplace.org/topics/tech/flackcheck-separating-facts-political-malarkey


Shiffman, Karen (Executive Producer) (2010). On Point with Tom Ashbrook. Political Humor. 28 October. Listen Here: http://www.onpointradio.org/2010/10/political-comedy-then-and-now

Greenbaum, Susan (Executive Producer) (2010). Radio Times with Marty Moss-Coane. Political Satire. 29 September. Listen Here: http://whyy.org/cms/radiotimes/2010/09/29/the-role-of-satire-in-our-political-discourse/

Lambe, Claudia (Executive Producer) (2008). KGO News Radio Evening Report Interview. 3 November.

Arnold, Elizabeth and Brown, Aaron (2008) "Down to the Wire" Special live nationwide pre-election conversation. National Public Radio. 2 November. Listen here at Hour 2: 46 minutes 16 seconds in.

Birge, Elizabeth (2008). "Late-night comedy: Must-see TV. Must-do for candidates." The Star Ledger. 1 November. Read it here.

Steiner, Mark (2008) "A look at political humor during the campaign season." The Mark Steiner Show, NPR Baltimore. 27 October.  Listen/Read here.

McFarland, Melanie (2007) "Late-night is returning.  Whom with the joke be on?"  Seattle Post Intelligencer, 17 December. Transcript Here.

Research cited by Washington Post columnist Kathleen Parker on NBC's Sunday morning show, "The Chris Matthews Show,"  21 October.  Transcript Here.

Durham, Michelle (2008) "Expert shows link between voters, late-night comedy." KYW1060 Newsradio, 28 October. Transcript Here.

Shister, Gail.  (2007) “Young Adults Eschew Traditional Nightly News for 'The Daily Show'" Philadephia Inquirer, 13 May.  Read Article Here

Moss-Coane, M.  (Executive Producer) (2007) .“Disinformation:  An interview with Brooks Jackson and Kathleen Hall Jamieson, the  authors of "UnSpun."," Radio Times with Marty Moss-Coane on WHYY, May 15

Moss-Coane, M.  (Executive Producer) (2006). “Hour 2:  Spotlight on 1812 Productions Holiday Show:  This is the Week that is," Radio Times with Marty Moss-Coane on WHYY, 1 December.  Listen to the archived show  HERE or at:  http://www.whyy.org/rameta/RT/2006/RT20061201_20_2.ram

Garofoli, J. (2004) “The Next Challenge is Keeping Young Voters Interested.” San Fransisco Chronicle, 7 November, A13.

Lindell, C. (2005) “DeLay Jokes Light up Late-night TV.” Cox News Service, 22 April.

Goodman, T. (2004) “Jon Stewart, Seriously, here to stay” San Fransisco Chronicle, 29 October, E1.

Garofoli, J. (2004) “Young voters turning to fake anchor for insight; comic Jon Stewart scores points with rant on Crossfire” San Fransisco Chronicle, 21 October, A1.

Long, B. (2004) “Daily Show viewers ace political quiz: Survey reveals late-night tv viewers better informed” CNN.com, 29 September.

Larson, M. (2004) “Comedy Central’s Daily Show Viewers Know Politics” Mediaweek.com, 28 September.

Correy, S. (2004) “Seriously Funny Politics” Background Briefing, Australian Broadcasting Corporation Newsradio, available on-line at http://www.abc.net.au/rn/talks/bbing/stories/s1168895.htm, 1 August.

Young, D. G. (2004) “No Laughing Matter: Do the Late-night Comics make a Difference?” www.gadflyer.com, 4 May.



Research reports

National Annenberg Election Survey (2004), “Daily Show Viewers Knowledgeable About Presidential Campaign,” available on-line at: http://www.naes04.org,  21 September.

National Annenberg Election Survey (2004), “Young People Watch more Late-night Television,” available on-line at: www.naes04.org,  3 May


Other projects

“Politics in Popular Culture” (2006; 2010) chapter text boxes in Ginsberg, B., Lowi, T. J., and Weir, M. (Eds.) We the People: An Introduction to American Politics, 6th and 7th Editions. New York: WW Norton and Co.


Conference presentations

Young, D. G. & Esralew, S. (2011). The World According to Snooki:  Uniting Uses & Gratifications with Cultivation Research in the Study of Reality TV Effects.Paper to be presented at the annual conference of the National Communication Association, New Orleans, LA.

Hoffman, L. H., Jones, P. E., & Young, D. G. (2011). Engaging in Politics Online: The Significance of Citizen Perceptions in Distinguishing Among Online Political Behaviors. Paper presented to the annual conference of the International Communication Association, Boston, MA, May.

Jones, P. E., Hoffman, L. H., & Young, D. G. (2011). Civic Engagement 2.0: How Do Emotional Online Appeals by Candidates Shape Citizen Participation? Paper to be presented at the annual conference of the Midwest Political Science Association, Chicago, IL, March.

Young, D. G. & Nigro, M. (2010) The Conflation of Sarah Palin & Tina Fey: The Press' Evolving 'Feylin' Narrative. Paper presentation at the Political Communication Preconference of the American Political Science Association Meeting, Washington, DC: 1 September.

Jones, P. E., Hoffman, L., Young, D. G., Carrion, J., Wilson, D. (2010). Political Communication and Engagement in the 21st Century.  Paper presentation at the Political Communication Preconference of the American Political Science Association Meeting, Washington, DC: 1 September.

Esralew, S., & Young, D. G (2010). The Influence of Parodies on Mental Models: Exploring the Tina Fey - Sarah Palin Phenomenon. Paper presentation at the American Political Science Association Meeting, Washington, DC: 2-4 September.


Jones, P. E., Hoffman, L., Young, D. G., Carrion, J., Wilson, D. (2010). Political Communication and Civic Engagement in the 21st Century: How do Emotional Appeals by Candidates Shape Citizen Participation?  Paper presentation at the American Political Science Association Meeting, Washington, DC: 2-4 September.


Young, D. G., & Hoffman, L. (2009) “An experimental exploration of political knowledge acquisition from The Daily Show versus CNN student news” Paper presentation at the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association, Toronto, Canada, 1-4 September.

Young, D. G. (2009) “Uniting political communication theory and pedagogy" Organizer and panelist on round table discussion at the Political Communication Division Preconference at the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association, Toronto, Canada, 1 September.

Young, D. G. (2009) “Recreatin' Sarah Palin: Tina Fey and the Construction of a Political Persona." Paper presentation at the annual meeting of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication, Boston, MA, 5-8 August.

Hoffman, L. H., & Young, D. G. (2009). Satire, Punch Lines, and the Nightly News: Untangling Media Effects on Political Participation. Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Association for Public Opinion Research, Hollywood, FL. May.

Young, D. G., Hoffman, L., Koenings, L., & Esralew, S. (2008) “"Is it Really Cynicism? The Effects of Viewing Political Comedy on Viewer Cynicism and Skepticism." Poster presentation at the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association, Boston, MA, 28-30 August.

Young, D. G. (2008) “Studying the New Media Environment: Theoretical and Methodological Challenges and Opportunities" Invited Round table panelist at the Political Communication Division Preconference at the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association, Boston, MA, 27 August.

Young, D. G. (2007) “Jon Stewart a heretic? Surely you jest. The Daily Show's Impact on Cynicism, Political Engagement and Participation." Paper presentation at the annual meeting of the National Communication Association, Chicago, IL, 15-18 November.

Young, D. G. and Caplan, S. (2007) “The use of online dating websites as sources of social support and self-expression for widows and widowers.” Paper presentation at the annual meeting of the International Association for Mass Communication Research, Paris, France, 23-25 July.

Young, D. G. (2006) “The Counterargument-Disruption Model of Political Humor (CADIMO): Late-night Political Humor’s Effects on Cognitive Elaboration and the Conditional Effects of Partisanship.” Paper presentation at the annual meeting of the National Communication Association, San Antonio, TX, 15-19 November.

Feldman, L. and Young, D. G. (2006) “Late-Night Comedy as a Gateway to Traditional News: An Analysis of Time Trends in News Attention among Late-Night Comedy Viewers during the 2004 Presidential Primaries.” Paper presentation at the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association, Philadelphia, PA, 1-4 September.

Young, D. G. (2005) “The Daily Show as The New Journalism: In their own words.” Paper presentation at the annual meeting of the National Communication Association, Boston, MA, 17-20 November.

Young, D. G. (2005) “When I think Kerry I think Flip-Flopper? An experimental exploration of the effects of political jokes on issue and trait salience.” Paper presentation at the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association, Washington, DC, 1-4 September.

Kenski, K. & Young, D. G. (2005) “The effects of party identification on opinion processing.” Paper presentation at the annual meeting of the American Association of Public Opinion Research, Miami, FL, 12-15 May.

Young, D. G. (2004) “The Chicken or the Egg? Tracking Themes in Late-night Jokes and Trends in Viewers’ Candidate Perceptions during the Primaries.” Paper presentation at the annual meeting of the National Communication Association, Chicago, IL, 11-14 November.

Young, D. G. & Tisinger, R. (2004) “Late-night comedy: Substitute or Supplement? The Predictors of Exposure to Late-night Comedy Programs and Comparative Rates of News Consumption among avid Late-night Consumers.” Paper presentation at the annual meeting of the National Communication Association, Chicago, IL, 11-14 November.

Young, D. G. (2004) “The Counterargument-Disruption Model of Political Humor (CADIMO): An experimental exploration of the effects of late-night political jokes on cognitive elaboration and the conditional effects of partisanship.” Paper presentation at the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association, Chicago, IL, 2-5 September.

Young, D. G. & Kenski, K. (2004) “Trends in voter policy preferences and issue coverage in media content during the 2000 presidential election.” Paper presentation at the American Political Science Association pre-conference, Chicago, IL, 2-5 September.

Kenski, K. & Young, D. G. (2004) “Policy-based Evaluation or Projection?: The formation of public opinion about presidential candidates during the 2000 party nominating conventions.” Paper presentation at the annual meeting of the American Association for Public Opinion Research, Phoenix, AZ, 13-16 May.

**Winner of AAPOR's Seymour Sudman Student Paper Competition.

Young, D. G. (2003). “Laughing at our leaders: the role of the late-night rhetoric in the average American’s candidate lexicon” Paper presentation at the annual conference of the National Communication Association, Miami, FL, 19-23 November.

Young, D. G. (2003). “The Counter-argument Disruption Model of Political Humor” Paper presentation at the annual conference of the National Communication Association, Miami, FL, 19-23 November.

Young, D. G. (2003). “The Kiss, the Coke-head and the Creator of the Internet: Late-night Comedy’s Influence on the Salience of Campaign Events, Candidate Traits and Issues in the 2000 Election” Poster session at the annual conference of the American Political Science Association, Philadelphia, PA, 28-31 August.

Vincent Price, Dannagal Goldthwaite Young, Joseph Cappella, Anca Romantan, (2003). “Increasing Civic Engagement through On-Line Deliberation” Preconference presentation at the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association, Philadelphia, PA, 28-31 August.

Dannagal Goldthwaite (2003) “Television, Materialism, and Civic Engagement” Presentation to the annual conference of the International Communication Association, San Diego, CA, 23-27 May.

Dannagal Goldthwaite (2003) “Media Use and the National Annenberg Election Survey” Presentation to the annual conference of the New England chapter of the American Association for Public Opinion Research, Sudbury, MA, 4 April.

Dannagal Goldthwaite (2002). “Sacrifice, Consumption, and the American way of Life: Domestic wartime propaganda in the Saturday Evening Post during World War II” Presentation to the annual conference of the National Communication Association, New Orleans, LA, 21-24 November.

Dannagal Goldthwaite (2002). “Pinocchio v. Dumbo: Priming Candidate Caricatures in Late-night Comedy Programs and the Moderating Effects of Political Knowledge” Panel Presentation at the annual conference of the American Political Science Association, Boston, MA, 29 August – 1 September.

Dannagal Goldthwaite (2002). "Persuasion Through Late-night Comedy Programs in the 2000 Presidential Election and the Moderating Effects of Political Knowledge" Presentation to the annual conference of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication, Miami, FL, 7-10 August.

Vincent Price, Danna Goldthwaite, & Joseph N. Cappella (2002). “Online Deliberation, Civic Engagement, and Social Trust” Presentation to the annual conference of the International Communication Association, Seoul, Korea, 15-19 July.

Dannagal Goldthwaite, Vincent Price, & Joseph N. Cappella (2002). “Civic Engagement, Social Trust, and Online Deliberation” Presentation to the annual conference of the American Association of Public Opinion Research, St. Pete Beach, FL, 16-19 May.

Vincent Price, Danna Goldthwaite, & Joseph N. Cappella (2002). "Deliberation, Civic Engagement, and Social Trust" Presentation to the annual conference of the Midwest Political Science Association, Chicago, IL, 25-18 April.

Vincent Price & Danna Goldthwaite (2001). "Deliberation, Civic Engagement, and Social Trust." Paper presented at the Annenberg Syposium on Deliberation, Democracy, and the Internet, Washington, DC 10 November.

Joseph N., Vincent Price, Yariv Tsfati & Danna Goldthwaite (2000). "Theory and Research on Deliberation and its Impact" Presentation to the annual conference of the National Communication Association, Seattle, WA, November.



2006 Annenberg graduation