Rachel Jane Derry


 

Children of Rachel Jane & William Alexander:

Alexander, Martha A

Alexander, Edward

Alexander, Emma E

Alexander, Keely L


Brothers:

CARLISLE DERRY

WILLIAM DERRY

LOUIS DERRY

JOHN H. DERRY

PHILLIP W. DERRY

BASIL B. DERRY

WILLIAM "MANSON" DERRY

CHARLES EDWARD DERRY

JAMES FRANKLIN DERRY


Sisters:

Sarah Catherine Derry

NANCY ELIZABETH DERRY

MATILDA ELSIE DERRY

ELIZABETH MARY DERRY


Parents:

Basil & Sarah Slater-Derry


Lineage:

Grandparents:

Jacob & Rachel Bright-Derry


G-Grandparents:

Jacob? & Mary "Old Moll" Derry


2nd Grandparents:

Baltser & Barbara Diery-Derry


The Patriots

 


3rd Grandparents:

 JACOB DIERY-DERRY


4th G-Grandparents:


Derry Family DNA Project



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RACHEL JANE DERRY, b. 1844. d. After 1880. A daughter of Basil-1820 & Sarah Slater. Married WILLIAM ALEXANDER.

 

Marriages Schuyler County 1856-1864   pg 59
May 25th - July 22nd, 1861.

License #: 3104
William L. Alexander
Rachael Jane Derry
Married: 25 May 1861           by:  Charles G. Dorsey


WILLIAM L. ALEXANDER, of section 30, Huntsville township, settled in the county in 1861. He was born in Russell county, Virginia, December 19, 1836. His parents were WILLIAM and MARY (McReynolds) ALEXANDER. The grandfather of our subject was JOHN ALEXANDER, born in the north of Ireland. He came to the United States, where he settled and pursued farming. He married and reared a large family. His son, WILLIAM, was born in 1802 and was a farmer, marrying in Virginia. In 1840 he came to Illinois and settled in Adams county, North East township, where he became the owner of 400 acres of land on which he made good improvements. He died in 1887, his wife having died a few years previously. They were members of the Presbyterian Church and the father was a Democrat in politics. He was poor when he settled in Illinois, owning only a horse and a wagon. They had 13 children, all of whom attained their majority: NANCY; JOHN; MARY; RACHEL; MARGARET; WILLIAM L.; DAVIS (David); DANIEL; MITCHELL; MARTHA; SAMUEL; ROBERT WILSON; and REBECCA.

WILLIAM L. was reared on the farm. In 1862 he enlisted in Company I, 84th Illinois Infantry, and served until the close of the war. He was in the battles of Perryville, Kentucky, Stone River and Chickamauga, Tennessee, and the Atlanta Campaign. He returned with General Thomas and participated in the fight at Franklin and Nashville. He was mustered out at Camp Harker, Tennessee. He was a non-commissioned officer. At the battle of Kennesaw Mountain he received a gunshot wound in the head, for which he now receives a pension.

After the war he returned to Schuyler county, where he owned 60 acres of land, purchased in 1864. He has since pursued farming and now owns 541 acres of land and has two good sets of farm buildings. In addition to his farming he has raised stock and dealt in the same. Since 1889 he has rented all his land.

He was married in 1861 to RACHEL J. DERRY, daughter of BASIL and SARAH DERRY. She was born in Adams county, near Quincy. Mr. and Mrs. ALEXANDER have four children: MARTHA A., wife of WILLIAM H. NAYLOR, resides in Baxtor Springs, Kansas; EDWARD, died aged 19; EMMA, wife of EDWARD STRAUB of Galesburg, Illinois; KEELY L. is at home. In politics Mr. ALEXANDER is a Democrat and has been a member of the school board. His wife is an earnest Christian lady, but not a member of any sect. Mr. ALEXANDER has made his property and is a well-to-do man, richly deserving the respect in which he is held by all who know him.
(Biographical Review - Cass, Schuyler and Brown Counties, Illinois, 1892, pg. 288, 289)

(The above information was transcribed by Derry family researcher, Joan Brown Derry)

The census summary for Rachel and William Alexander is shown below:

      1870 1880
    State IL IL
    County Schuyler Schuyler
    Twp/City Huntsville Huntsville
    YOB/YOM/YOD Age, BP Age, BP
Alexander, William Head 1837/1861/ 34, VA 43, VA
Derry, Rachel Jane Wife 1844/1861/ 26, IL 37, IL
Alexander, Martha A Dau 1862// 8, IL  
Alexander, Edward Son 1864// 4, IL 14, IL
Alexander, Emma E Dau 1868// 2, IL 12, IL

Census information courtesy: Karen Kurtz

 

The Civil War

84th Illinois Infantry Regiment
Col. Louis H. Waters; LtCols. Thomas Hamer, Charles H. Morton; Majs. Charles H. Morton, Caleb B. Cox.
This regiment was organized at Quincy, in Aug., 1862, and was mustered into the U. S. service Sept. 1, for three years, with 939 men and officers. It was ordered to Louisville, Ky., Sept. 23 and was assigned to the 1Oth brigade of the 4th division. It was at the battle of Perryville and on the march with Buell through Kentucky in the pursuit of the Confederate army under Bragg; participated in the battle of Stone's river, where it lost 228 men and officers killed and wounded, out of a total of 350 engaged; was in the Tullahoma campaign and at the battle of Chickamauga, in Chattanooga during what was called the "siege," and with Hooker at Lookout mountain, in the "fight above the clouds." It participated in the Atlanta campaign, the battles at Franklin and Nashville, and was mustered out at the expiration of its term. Its total casualties (killed, wounded) in battle were 558; killed by accident, 7; died of disease, 124; total casualties, 689.
Source: The Union Army, vol. 3"


The 84th

One of the most gallant regiments of a gallant state was the one known as the 84th infantry. It was organized at Quincy, Illinois, in August, 1862, by Colonel Lewis H. Waters, who had served a few months as the lieutenant-colonel of the 28th infantry, and who had resigned to come home and raise a new regiment. On the 1st of September, 1862, the regiment was mustered into the service of the United States with 951 men, rank and file. It was on September 23, ordered to report at Louisville, Kentucky, and on arrival at that place was assigned to the 10th brigade of the 4th division, and one the 29th of the same year marched with the balance of the troops in pursuit of General Bragg. After a long and weary march through Bardstown, Danville, Perryville, Crab Orchard, Wild Cat, Somerset, Columbia, Gallatin and Silver Springs, the command reached Nashville, Tennessee. The first battle of any importance in which the regiment participated was that known as Stone River, or the battle of Murfreesboro, which occurred on the 31st of December 1862, and on the 2d and 3d of January 1863. General Rosecrans had assumed the command of the army lately under General Buell and had concentrated his forces at Nashville. From thence he marched to meet General Braxton Bragg, the rebel commander, who, with a heavy column was moving north on a second grand expedition, and had already reached Murfreesboro. Both Generals had formed the same plan for the approaching contest. As the union left was crossing Stone river to attack the rebel right, the strong rebel left fell heavily on the weak union right. At first the onset was irresistable. But General Sheridan was there and his generalship held the ground until Rosecrans could recall the left, replant his batteries and establish a new line of battle. Upon this new front the rebels charged four times, but were driven back with heavy losses. This was upon the 31st of December. On the 2d of January following General Bragg renewed the contest, but being again unsuccessful, retreated. This is claimed to have been one of the bloodiest conflicts during the war, and the gallant 84th played the part of heroes, losing 228 men, killed and wounded. This battle was the last attempt of the rebels to wrest Kentucky from our grasp, and placed General Bragg upon the defensive. At Woodbury, on the 17th of January, while in pursuit, the 84th had another brush with the enemy, but no general engagement took place until during the summer months. General Rosecrans, feeling his inferiority in cavalry, made no formal movement until June, when with 60,000 men, among whom was the 84th, he marched in search of General Bragg. The latter day at Chattanooga, and when Rosecrans threatened his communications, he was too able a strategist to allow himself to be cooped up in a fortified place, and evacuated the place. Rosecrans, thinking that Bragg was in full retreat pushed on rapidly in his rear, but the rebel general, having received some powerful re-enforcements, turned on him so suddenly that he well nigh caught him unprepared and scattered over 40 miles of line. But the union forces rapidly concentrated, and the two armies met upon the Chickamanga, the "river of death," as the Indian name implies. On the 19th of September the armies engaged but the contest was indecisive and on the 20th was resumed. About noon the federal line became broken from the movement of troops to help the left wing, then hardly pressed. Longstreet seized the opportunity and pushed a brigade into the gap, and following it up, swept the union right and center from the field. The crowd of fugitives bore Rosecrans, himself away. In this crisis of the battle all depended upon the left under General Thomas, who alone stood between the rebels and disaster and rout. Through the long afternoon these veterans stood whilst around them surged the whole rebel force, but in vain, Illinois, Iowa, Ohio and Minnesota's bravest men stood there and bore the brunt of many a hard pressed charge and earned for General Thomas his name of "Rock of Chickamauga." When night had come, General Thomas deliberately withdrew to Chattanooga. All through this bloody day, the 84th fought nobly and when rallied around their colors and the roll called, 172 men failed to respond, being either killed or wounded. They now with the balance of the union army were shut up in the entrenchments of that place, while Bragg occupied the hills and threatened the city. The garrison was threatened with starvation.

Grant was now appointed to supercede General Rosecrans, and hastened to Chattanooga, but being afraid that Thomas, who had command after Rosecrans left, would surrender before re-inforcements could reach him, telegraphed him to hold fast. The old Roman's reply was "I will stay till I starve." On Grant's arrival things began to wear a different aspect. A corps from the army of the Potomac, 23,000 strong under General Joseph Hooker came, and General W. T. Sherman hastened by forced marches from Iuka, 200 miles away, and communications were again restored. On the 24th of November, the 84th was ordered on duty and helped fight the ever memorable battle of Lookout Mountain. Hooker was ordered to charge the enemy but to stop on the high ground, but the men, carried away by the ardor of the attack, swept on, over the crest, driving the enemy before them. The next morning Hooker advanced on the south of Missionary Ridge. Sherman had been the whole time pounding away on the northern flank, and Grant perceiving that the rebel line in front of him was being weakened to repel these attacks on the flank, saw that the critical moment had arrived and launched Thomas' corps on its center.

"The signals for the attack had been arranged," says B. F. Taylor, in his account of the battle, "six cannon shots fired at intervals of two seconds. The moment arrived. Strong and steady the order rang out: Number one, fire! number two, fire! number three, fire! It seemed to me like the tolling of the clock of destiny. And when at number six, fire! the roar throbbed out with the flash, you should have seen the dead line, that had been lying behind the works all day, come to resurrection in the twinkling of an eye, and leap like a blade from its scabbard."

The orders were to take the rifle-pits at the foot of Missionary Ridge, then halt and re-form; but the men forgot them all, and carrying the works at the base, swept up the ascent. Grant caught the grand inspiration, and ordered a grand charge along the whole front. Up they went, without firing a shot, over rocks, trees, and stumps, surmounted the crest, captured the guns and turned them upon the enemy, now fully routed, and in disorderly retreat. Although the 84th held its accustomed place, in these battles it was fortunate enough to lose only nine men.

Early in the spring General Sherman started upon the ever memorable Atlanta campaign. He had with him about 100,000 men of all arms, among whom was the 84th Illinois. General Joseph E. Johnston, the rebel commander, barred the way and the heroic regiment participated in the battle of Dalton, on the 13th of May, 1864, Resaca, May 14, Burnt Hickory, May 26 to 31, and Dallas, June 1, 2, and 3. At the battle of Kenesaw mountain and during the siege of Atlanta it bore a prominent part. When Sherman drew out of Atlanta, Thomas' corps was left to defend Nashville, and during the sanguinary conflicts that occurred at Franklin and Nashville, December 15, and 16, the 84th bore off the usual palm of victory. The total causalities, in the different battles, in this regiment reached the number of 558 men. On the 8th of June, 1865, at Nashville, Tennessee, the 84th was mustered out of service and returned home. There were 205 men from McDonough county in this favorite regiment, in five different companies, A, B, C, D and F, and of these 11 were killed; 39 died; 39 were wounded, and one was captured and died in Andersonville prison-pen.

History of McDonough County, Illinois, 1885, Continental Historical Co., Springfield, Illinois. Transcribed by Robin Petersen for McDonough County ILGenWeb

Copyright 1999, 2000 Robin L. W. Petersen; all rights reserved. For personal use only. Commercial use of the information contained in these pages is strictly prohibited without prior permission. If copied, this copyright must appear with the information.


William served along side his Father-in-law, Basil Derry. and,John Jacob Weidenhamer - IIIBasil's Brother-in-law, and brother of Fredericka Christena.
 

 

Company "I" 84th Illinois Infantry Roster
Name Rank Residence Date of
Muster
Remarks
ALEXANDER, D.A. Corporal North East Sep 1, 1862 Died at Nashville Tenn., Jan 20, 1863; wounds
ALEXANDER, David M. 1st Lt. North East Feb 29, 1864 Mustered out Jun 8, 1865
ALEXANDER, David M. 2nd Lt. Clayton Jun 20, 1863 Promoted [Jan 8, 1864]
ALEXANDER, D. M. Private North East Sep 1, 1862 Promoted 2d Lieut. [Feb 15, 1863]
ALEXANDER, W. L. Private North East Sep 1, 1862 M.O. Jun 8, 1865 as Corp'l
BACKMAN, A. C. Private Clayton Sep 1, 1862 Died at Quincy, Oct 22, 1864
BARNART, Calvin Private McKee Sep 1, 1862 Died at Murfreesboro, Tenn., Mar 24, 1863
BATES, Francis H. Private Clayton Sep 1, 1862 Disch. Jan 14, 1863; disabil
BELL, James Recruit ---- Sep 24, 1862 Died at Nashville, Dec 15, 1862
BINKLEY, N. A. Private Huntsville Sep 1, 1862 Mustered out Jun 8, 1865
BOBBITT, Hardy G. Private Pea Ridge Sep 1, 1862 Mustered out Jun 8, 1865
BOILS, John Private Brown Co Sep 1, 1862 M.O. Jun 8, 1865, wounded
BOWKER, Clark Private Huntsville Sep 1, 1862 Disch. Jan 17, 1863; disabil
BOWMAN, John H. Private Lee Sep 1, 1862 Died at Nashville, Dec 25, 1862
BRADY, Charles M. Recruit Buckhorn Mar 15, 1864 Tr to Co F, 21st Illinois Infantry.
BRADY, Hugh Private McKee Sep 1, 1862 Tr. to VRC Oct 29, 1864, wounded
BROTHERS, Samuel Private McKee Sep 1, 1862 Died at Liberty, Ill., Mar 27, 1864
BROTHERS, Wilson Private McKee Sep 1, 1862 Drowned May 5, 1863
BROWN, I.M. Private Concord Sep 1, 1862 Mustered out Jun 8, 1865
BROWN, Thomas N. Private Concord Sep 1, 1862 M.O. Jun 8, 1865 as Corp'l
BUTLER, W. J. Private McKee Sep 1, 1862 Mustered out Jun 8, 1865
CAIN, Laban Private Clayton Sep 1, 1862 Mustered out Jun 8, 1865
CAIN, Nelson Private Clayton Sep 1, 1862 Died at Nashville, Feb 7, 1863; wounds
CAIN, Samuel 2nd Lieut. Clayton Not Must'd M.O. Jun 8, 1865 as Serg't.
CAIN, Samuel Corporal Clayton Sep 1, 1862 M.O. Jun 8, 1865 as 1st Serg't.
CARTER, John B. Private Clayton Sep 1, 1862 M.O. Jun 8, 1865 as Corp'l
CLARK, Archibald Private Brown Co. Sep 1, 1862 Killed at Stone River, Dec 31, 1863
CRAWFORD, W. D. Private McKee Sep 1, 1862 Died at Murfreesboro, T., Jan 10,1863; wounds
CROMWELL, Henry Corporal Clayton Sep 1, 1862 M.O. Jun 8, 1865 as Serg't.
DAUGHERTY, John Sergeant Clayton Sep 1, 1862 Mustered out Jun 8, 1865
DAUGHERTY, Thomas Private Clayton Sep 1, 1862 Mustered out Jun 8, 1865
DAVIS, Edward Corporal Pea Ridge Sep 1, 1862 Mustered out Jun 8, 1865
DAVIS, W. H. Private Huntsville Sep 1, 1862 Mustered out Jun 8, 1865
DERRY, Basil Private Huntsville Sep 1, 1862 Disch. Jan 4, 1863; disabil
DOYLE, Samuel Private Clayton Sep 1, 1862 Dropped as deserter, Oct 1, 1864
EDWARDS, M.P. 1st Serg't. Clayton Sep 1, 1862 Disch. Dec.,1862 as priv.; disabil
FRITZON, Fred J. Private Brown Co Sep 1, 1862 Mustered out Jun 8, 1865
GALLAWAY, T. G. Private Concord Sep 1, 1862 Killed at Stone River, Dec 31, 1862
GIDDINGS, G. H. Private Pea Ridge Sep 1, 1862 Disch. Feb 7, 1863; disabil
GRIFFITH, Albert J. Captain Clayton Sep 1, 1862 Resigned Feb 1, 1863
GROVES, Samuel W. Private McKee Sep 1, 1862 Mustered out Jun 8, 1865
HALL, Atlas Private McKee Sep 1, 1862 Mustered out Jun 8, 1865
HAMILTON, Lemuel B. Private Canton, Mo. Sep 1, 1862 Tr. to Brigade Band, May 20, 1863
HANDLEY, Wm. H.H. Private McKee Sep 1, 1862 Mustered out Jun 8, 1865
HAWK, David Recruit ---- Sep 24, 1862 Died at Bowling Green, Ky. Dec 5, 1862
HEIGLEY, Harlow Private Concord Sep 1, 1862 Died at Nashville, Jan 29, 1863; wounds
HENLON, William B. Private North East Sep 1, 1862 Tr. to Inv Corps, Aug 31, 1863
HENRY, William E. Private Clayton Sep 1, 1862 Disch. Dec 24, 1862; disabil
HORNEY, A. S. Private North East Sep 1, 1862 Died at Murfreesboro, Tenn., Jan 24, 1863; wounds
INMAN, Aaron Private McKee Sep 1, 1862 Mustered out Jun 8, 1865
JOHNSON, Cyrene Private Bickhorn Sep 1, 1862 Tr. to VRC Nov 1, 1864, wounded
JOHNSON, Francis M. Private Buckhorn Sep 1, 1862 Died at Bowling Green, Ky., Dec 1, 1862
KENDRICK, Thomas F. 2nd Lieut. Clayton Sep 1, 1862 Died at Nov 17, 1862
KIMRY, John J. Private Huntsville Sep 1, 1862 Killed at Kenesaw Mt., Jun 24, 1864
LAMBERT, Simeon Private Pea Ridge Sep 1, 1862 Disch. Feb 18, 1863; disabil
LATHROP, J. W. Private McKee Sep 1, 1862 Died at Nashville, Dec 28, 1862
LAUGHLIN, F. Private Clayton Sep 1, 1862 Mustered out Jun 8, 1865
LOGUE, John S. 1st Lt. Clayton Jun 20, 1863 Resigned Dec 31, 1863
LOGUE, John S. 2nd Lt. Clayton Mar 6, 1863 Promoted [Feb 15, 1863]
LOGUE, J. C. Corporal Clayton Sep 1, 1862 Promoted 2d Lieut. [Feb 2, 1863]
LONG, R. D. Private Clayton Sep 1, 1862 Disch. Mar 17, 1864; disabil
MANLOVE, David R. Private LaPrairie Sep 1, 1862 Died at Nashville, Mar.29,1863,wounds
MANLOVE, James B. Corporal North East Sep 1, 1862 M.O. Jun 8, 1865 as Serg't.
MARSHALL, Elisha Private Clayton Sep 1, 1862 Mustered out Jun 8, 1865
MARTIN, David H. Private Beverly Sep 1, 1862 Died at Nashville, Dec 14, 1862
MARTIN, Thomas Private Concord Sep 1, 1862 Mustered out Jun 8, 1865
MASON, Peter Private McKee Sep 1, 1862 Disch. Dec 1862; wounds
McCOWAN, J. D. Private Clayton Sep 1, 1862 M.O. Jun 8, 1865, wounded
McCURDY, Daniel Private Pea Ridge Sep 1, 1862 M.O. Jun 8, 1865, wounded
McDOWELL, Andrew S. Captain Clayton Mar 6, 1863 Mustered out Jun 8, 1865
McDOWELL, Andrew S. 2nd Lt. Clayton Jan 26, 1863 Promoted [Feb 2, 1863]
McDOWELL, A. S. Private Clayton Sep 1, 1862 Promoted Q.M. Serg't.
MILLER, Dirk Private LaPrairie Sep 1, 1862 Killed at Stone River, Dec 31, 1862
MILLS, William Sergeant McKee Sep 1, 1862 Died at Nashville, Dec 3, 1862
MORRIS, J.B. Corporal Concord Sep 1, 1862 Disch. Nov 15, 1864; disabil
MYERS, George T. Recruit Buckhorn Mar 15, 1864 Tr to Co F, 21st Illinois Infantry.
MYERS, Gilbert K. Recruit Buckhorn Mar 15, 1864 Tr to Co F, 21st Illinois Infantry.
MYERS, Thomas T. Private Buckhorn Sep 1, 1862 Tr. to VRC Jan 15, 1864
MYERS, William H. Private Buckhorn Sep 1, 1862 Died at Louisville,KY, Jan 26, 1863; wounds
PATTERSON, W. S Private Lee Sep 1, 1862 Killed at Kenesaw Mt., Jun 24, 1864
PEVEHOUSE, J.B. Private Clayton Sep 1, 1862 Mustered out Jun 8, 1865
PEVEHOUSE, Wm. W Private Clayton Sep 1, 1862 M.O. Jun 8, 1865 as Serg't.
SCOTT, Crawford Private Clayton Sep 1, 1862 Killed at Stone River, Dec 31, 1862
SCOTT, William 1st Lt. Clayton Sep 1, 1862 Resigned Feb 15, 1863
SHEHONY, Duddley Private McKee Sep 1, 1862 Died at Murfreesboro, T., Apr.23,1863
SHEHONY, William W. Private McKee Sep 1, 1862 Died at Louisville, Dec 9, 1862
SLAGLE, D. N. Private McKee Sep 1, 1862 M.O. Jun 8, 1865 as Corp'l
SLAGLE, John F. Private McKee Sep 1, 1862 Mustered out Jun 8, 1865
STEVENS, George M. Private Concord Sep 1, 1862 Died at Nashville, Feb 16, 1863; wounds
STEVENS, Joseph Corporal McKee Sep 1, 1862 Mustered out Jun 8, 1865
STEVENS, Robert Private Concord Sep 1, 1862 M.O. Jun 8, 1865, wounded
STEVENS, William Sergeant Lee Sep 1, 1862 Disch. Jan 14, 1863; disabil
STINSON, James Private Buckhorn Sep 1, 1862 Mustered out Jun 8, 1865
TATMAN, Charles L. Private McKee Sep 1, 1862 Mustered out Jun 8, 1865
TAYLOR, Ithamar S. Private Quincy Sep 1, 1862 Trans. to Brigade Band, May 20, 1863
THOMAS, Curtis E. Recruit Clayton Mar 7, 1865 Tr to Co F, 21st Illinois Infantry.
THOMAS, Warren O. Private Pea Ridge Sep 1, 1862 Mustered out Jun 8, 1865
TURNER, Abram Recruit ---- Sep 1, 1862 Died at Stone River, Dec 31, 1862; wounds
WEAR, D. C. Private McKee Sep 1, 1862 M.O. Jun 8, 1865 as Corp'l
WEBB, William H. Private McKee Sep 1, 1862 Disch. Jun 6, 1864; wounds
WHITESIDE, J. W. Sergeant Clayton Sep 1, 1862 M.O. Jun 8, 1865 as priv.
WHITLOCK, Ervin Recruit ---- Sep 24, 1862 Tr to VRC Sept. 30, 1863
WILDENHAMMER, J. L. (John Jacob WEIDENHAMER-III) Private Huntsville Sep 1, 1862 Disch. Apr. 25, 1863; disabil
WORLEY, Elihu Private McKee Sep 1, 1862 Died at Louisville, July 18, 1863
WRIGHT, Alonzo O. Private Huntsville Sep 1, 1862 Tr to VRC July 26, 1864
WRIGHT, John G. Private Lee Sep 1, 1862 Disch. Mar 19, 1863; disabil

 

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