Derry DNA Project Results
 


The Derry Family DNA Project Results


"...For us and our posterity."


 

Project Background:

A Preponderance of Evidence and DNA:
There had been much difficulty in proving the connection between Baltser Derry of Loudoun County, Virginia and the Derry’s of Fayette County, Pennsylvania, as there was no definitive proof.  Derry family researchers worked on a preponderance of evidence, linking the two families, including “oral family history,” “family came from Harper’s Ferry at an early day,” and Pennsylvania land referred to as, “Jacob Derry house,” and newspaper articles, “he (Bazil-born 1793), was a native of Loudoun County, Virginia, and was a son of Molly Derry, the Fortune Teller of the Revolution,” and other bread crumbs left by family members/family researchers.  Then, with the help of Derry family researchers and cousins, Joan Brown Derry and Connie Derry, we decided to embark on a DNA fact-finding mission.  Joan is the wife of Ronald Blair Derry, direct descendant of Bazil Derry (noted previous), son of “Old Molly,” and Connie Derry, a direct descendant of Philip B. Derry, son of Baltser Derry.  Ron and I agreed to take the swab test, but we needed a direct male descendant from the Loudoun County, Virginia Derry’s to take the DNA test, as only male descendants carry the (Y-DNA) genes from their fathers from generation to generation.  Connie assisted us in convincing her brother, Jason Lowell Derry to take the test.  Soon, we had other known and proven male members of the Loudoun County, Virginia Derry’s taking the test.

The first results came for Ron and myself.  Our alleles /al·lele/ (ah-lel´) were an exact match (Alleles are what must be compared among participants to see if a match is possible).  That match confirmed the connection between Ron’s 4th g-grandfather, Bazil, and my 2nd g-grandfather, Bazil’s brother, Jacob.  Bazil and Jacob are now confirmed as brothers with the same father.  As we held our collective breath, more test results came in.  First, Jason Lowell Derry, then James Derry, Thomas Kirtley Derry, and Gregory Lee Derry, all known direct descendants of the Loudoun County, Virginia Derry’s.  We all matched exactly, which meant the connections between the families were now proven.  This puts to rest the notion that our family came from Irish stock, and that our forefathers and foremothers immigrated to America during the Irish potato famine during the mid 1800’s, regardless of family lore, myth or belief.

With the news of Valentine and Mollie coming to America as Hessian soldiers, then defecting to fight on the American’s side with Morgan’s Riflemen, we find ourselves in a quandary once again as to the relationship between Baltser Derry and his brothers, Peter and Philip of Loudoun County, Virginia and Valentine Derry of Fayette County, Pennsylvania.  The DNA testing is indisputable; therefore, the relationship between Baltser Derry of Loudoun County, Virginia and Valentine Derry of Fayette County, Pennsylvania is absolute.  The question remains, how were these two men related?  While we can speculate as to their relationship, we must acknowledge they had a common male ancestor and are proud to embrace the Virginia Derry’s, as our blood cousins.

Project Goals:

Purpose of this project:
1. To put to rest questions of related Derry Family lines.
2. Establish a base to help other possible family members determine if they are related to this line of Derry's.


 
    DYS#
Kit #  Name *
H
a
p
l
o
3
9
3
3
9
0
1
9
3
9
1
3
8
5
a
3
8
5
b
4
2
6
3
8
8
4
3
9
3
8
9
|
1
3
9
2
3
8
9
|
2
4
5
8
4
5
9
a
4
5
9
b
4
5
5
4
5
4
4
4
7
4
3
7
4
4
8
4
4
9
4
6
4
a
4
6
4
b
4
6
4
c
4
6
4
d
4
6
0
G
A
T
A

H
4
Y
C
A

I
I

a
Y
C
A

I
I

b
4
5
6
6
0
7
5
7
6
5
7
0
C
D
Y

a
C
D
Y

b
4
4
2
4
3
8

 **

Ronald Blair Derry R1b1 13 25 15 11 11 15 12 12 12 13 13 29                                                  

 **

D. Doc Derry R1b 13 25 15 11 11 15 12 12 12 13 13 29                                                  

**

 Jason Lowell Derry R1b

13

25

15

11

11

15

12

12

12

13

13

29

                                                 

**

James Derry R1b

13

25

15

11

11

15

12

12

12

13

13

29

                                                 
**

Thomas Kirtley  Derry

R1b 13 25 15 11 11 15 12 12 12 13 13 29                                                  
**
Gregory Lee Derry
R1b1 13 25 15 11 11 15 12 12 12 13 13 29                                                  
**                                                                              
**

Greg Stephen Derry

R1b1 13 24 14 11 11 14 12 12 11 12 13 28                                                  
**                                                                              
**                                                                              
**

Earl Newman Derry

R1b1 14 24 14 12 11 14 12 12 12 13 13 29                                                  
**                                                                              
**

Harley Jack Derry

I 13 22 14 10 13 14 11 14 13 12 11 28 16 9 9 8 11 23 15 20 28 14 14 15 15 10 9 19 21 14 13 16 18 39 39 13 10
**

J Robert Derry

I 13 22 14 10 13 14 11 14 13 12 11 28                                                  
**                                                                              

**

                                                                             

 

Understanding the Results

Markers - These are the DYS numbers across the top of the results table (e.g. 393, 385a), and refer to the Locus, or specific location a gene occupies on a chromosome.  The markers in red have shown a faster mutation rate than the average, which is helpful when comparing results.

Alleles - These values are the actual test results.   An allele is determined for every marker in the test (which can be 12 or 25 markers, depending on which test the participant selected). Alleles are what must be compared among participants to see if a match is possible. 

Color Coding - The results for participants who have a genetic match are displayed with the same color.  Results are considered a match if they have at least 11/12 matching markers (for the 12-marker test) or 24/25 matching markers (for the 25-marker test). If you share the same surname or variant, this means that there is a 99.9% likelihood that you share a common ancestor in a genealogical time frame. If you match another person without the same surname or variant, you still probably share a common ancestor, but this ancestor most likely lived in the time before surnames were adopted.
 

Genetic Matches - If two individuals have a match with 12 markers, there is a 50% likelihood that their Most Recent Common Ancestor falls within 14.5 generations, and a 90% likelihood of 48 generations.  The 25-marker test provides a more precise analysis.  If two individuals have a match with 25 markers, the 50% likelihood drops to 7 generations and the 90% likelihood drops to 19.8 generations.  Since the markers shown in red mutate at a faster rate than the others, this should be taken into consideration when evaluating the results.  If an individual has an 11/12 or 23/25 match with another participant, and the mismatch occurs on one of the fast-mutating markers, there is a greater likelihood that they are related than if the mismatch occurs on one of the slower mutating markers.

*Haplo - Haplogroups in green have been confirmed by SNP testing. Haplogroups in red have been predicted by Family Tree DNA based on unambiguous results in the individual's personal page. This has been placed on this GAP page for your ease and convenience. Please note that for any predicted results we see no reason for ordering a SNP test to confirm the Haplogroup. If a – is in the HAPLO field then we feel that the comparative results are not clear and unambiguous and if the kit holder wants to know their SNP with 100% confidence they may consider ordering a SNP confirmation test.

** - DNA Kit numbers are not listed for privacy reasons.

 


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