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Rocky Mountain News, Denver, Colo.
July 18, 1911 Page 1

COLORADO PIONEER IS DEAD

Mrs. Mary T. James, a pioneer, died at Park Avenue Hospital last Saturday as a result of an operation.

Mrs. James came to Colorado in 1865 and a year later was married to George H. James in Black Hawk. She is survived by a daughter, Mrs. Martha C. Ballard. The funeral will be held this afternoon at 2 o'clock at the residence of E. W. Hurlbut, 1241 Pearl Street. Interment will be at Fairmount.

Contributed by: Rita Timm 1895 Denver

Rocky Mountain News, Denver, Colo.
September 30, 1911 Page 1

MRS. JAY JOSLIN DEAD; WIFE OF HEAD OF DRY GOODS FIRM

CAME TO DENVER IN 1873; WAS NOTED FOR HER CHARITY WORK.

Mrs. Mary Joslin, wife of Jay Joslin, President and founder of the Joslin Dry Goods Company, died at 3 o'clock yesterday morning at the family home, 2915 Champa Street, after an illness of only a week. The funeral will take place from the house tomorrow afernoon at 2 o'clock, and will be private. Interment will be in Fairmont cemetery.

While Mrs. Joslin's last illness was only a a week's duration, she has been failing for three years, having suffered a stroke of paralysis that seriously impaired her health. She was 78 years old, and notwithstanding her affliction she was always cheerful and hopeful and was constantly telling her husband, who is himself 82 years old, that her complete recovery was only a matter of time.


CAME TO DENVER IN 1873

Mrs. Joslin was born in Vermont of a prominent family and in 1873 removed to Denver with her husband and son. For thirty years the family has lived in the Champa Street home and only recently Mr. and Mrs. Joslin celebrated the sixtieth anniversary of their marriage. This event furnished her with much pleasure and she told her friends that she was very happy to have lived to celebrate that event.

Mrs. Joslin was a member of the Baptist Church and for years she was very active in all affairs of the church. She was naturally of a charitable disposition and all her life she was active in charity and yet she carried on this work without ostentation, always hiding her charities, when possible, even from her intimate friends.


MOURNED BY THE POOR

There are almost untold numbers who have benefited from her charitable heart who will miss her, not because of all that she did for them, but because of her sympathtic nature, for she was always a friend to those in trouble. She was particularly a friend of the poor and the needy and she gave bountifully to them.

Aside from her husband, Mrs. Joslin is survived by three children, all residents of Denver, Mrs. W. H. Milburn, 1011 Lincoln St., Mrs. F. P. Allen, 1110 Vine St., and Frank Joslin, 1740 Franklin St.

Contributed by: Rita Timm 1895 Denver

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