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Force Elastic with Force Probe

Force Elastic with Force Probe

Purpose:

In this activity you will be investigating the relationship between the force you apply to the spring and the length of the spring.

Info for Live Part:

  • Set your probe on 10N setting

  • Do not exceed 3x the original length of the spring with your largest stretch.

Procedure Part 1:  Virtual

  1. Open the program found here
  2. Before you create your data table, record the original length of your spring and the spring number you are using.
  3. Set up a data table that will hold 10 rows of data that will track the force applied to the spring and the length of the spring.
  4. Hit the start button and allow the person to stretch the spring to a new length.  Once the length of the spring stabilizes, record the average force needed to hold the spring at that new length and the new length of the spring.
  5. Reset your system and then hit start again.  Do not change your spring number during the course of this part of the lab.
  6. When you have collected all 1o of your data points, join up with someone who collected data on a different spring and plot two data sets on the same axes in Logger Pro.
  7. Call your teacher over when you are done to make sure you have done this properly.  Once you get approval from your teacher, you may start the live portion of this lab.

Procedure Part 2:  Live

  1. Hook your force probe to channel 1 of your LabQuest and open Logger Pro on your computer.
  2. Record the original length of your spring in your lab book before you make your data table.
  3. Set up a data table that will hold 10 rows of data that will track the force applied to the spring and the length of the spring.
  4. Set your force probe horizontally on your lab table and zero the probe by clicking on the "Zero Button" on your Logger Pro tool bar (the one immediately to the left of the green collect button)
  5. Hit the collect button and apply a certain amounts of force to your spring and record the length of the spring at that force value.  Hold the force steady for a few seconds and then use that "Statistics" feature from the "Analyze" menu to get the average force needed to create that length.
  6. Repeat this procedure for 10 different force values.
  7. Repeat for a different spring and then create a graph with two different data sets, one for each spring.
  8. Answer the questions found here.
Procedure Part 3:  Extra credit
  1. Pick one of the live springs that you used and bring it to the front of the room.
  2. Hang the spring from a ring stand.
  3. Hang the unknown mass on the end of the spring and measure the new length of the spring.
  4. Use the equation for that spring to find the force that caused that new length.
  5. Use the force to calculate the mass of the object you are hanging from the end of the spring.
Things needed in your lab book:

  1. Purpose

  2. Info including a picture of the lab set up

  3. Data table for part 1 and two data tables for part 2

  4. One graph for each part (containing both sets of data) with all the things a good graph must contain.

  5. An equation that relates force and length of spring for each graph.

  6. A statement of conclusion that  talks about what you learned and sources of error and methods to fix the errors.