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Simple Circuit Lab

Simple Circuit Lab


Purpose:


The purpose of this lab is to learn the connections between voltage, current, and resistance in a simple circuit


Info:


  • Lab Setup (place in lab book)

    https://docs.google.com/file/d/0B3qMUyQ6DRZ0Qk9qaFphOXp5d2s/edit?usp=drive_web


Procedure:

Part 1:  Voltage
  1. Open up the program found here in a new tab and click on the begin button to get started.

  2. Write down the four colors of your resistor and then figure out the value of this resistor and write that down also.  Don't change your resistor at all in part 1 of this lab.

  3. Create a data table that lists the number of batteries, the current (mA), the current (A) and the voltage measured by the meter (V).  Give enough rows for 5 different trials.

  4. Click on the battery box to see how many batteries are inside it.  Count the batteries and the go back to viewing the full circuit.

  5. Click on the current meter and watch the numeric display to get a sense of the current in the circuit.  Give a good estimate of this current in your data table.  Give the number in both mA and A.

  6. Click on the volt meter and watch the numeric display to get a sense of the voltage lost in the resistor.  Give a good estimate of this voltage in your data table.

  7. Click once again on the battery box and this time get a new battery pack and repeat the data collection with this new number of batteries.  Do 5 unique numbers of batteries.  Don't do the same number of batteries more than once.

  8. Create a graph of Voltage vs. number of batteries.  Copy the graph to your lab book and make sure it has all the things a good graph should contain including an equation.

  9. Create a graph of Current in Amps vs. Voltage.  Copy the graph to your lab book and make sure it has all the things a good graph should contain including an equation.

  10. Give one sentence describing the relationship between the current and voltage in a circuit.
Part 2:  Voltage with Resistor 2
  1. If you are working with a partner on this and you each collected data for part one on two different resistors, you can just each get the data collected by your partner and put it in your own lab book.  If you do this skip to step 9.

  2. If you are working on this alone or if you and your partner did not collect different data in part 1, then click on your resistor and generate a new resistor with a different resistance.  

  3. Write down the four colors of your resistor and then figure out the value of this resistor and write that down also.  Don't change this resistor at all in part 2 of this lab.

  4. Create a data table that lists the number of batteries, the current (mA), the current (A) and the voltage measured by the meter (V).  Give enough rows for 5 different trials.

  5. Click on the battery box to see how many batteries are inside it.  Count the batteries and the go back to viewing the full circuit.

  6. Click on the current meter and watch the numeric display to get a sense of the current in the circuit.  Give a good estimate of this current in your data table.  Give the number in both mA and A.

  7. Click on the volt meter and watch the numeric display to get a sense of the voltage lost in the resistor.  Give a good estimate of this voltage in your data table.

  8. Click once again on the battery box and this time get a new battery pack and repeat the data collection with this new number of batteries.  Do 5 unique numbers of batteries.  Don't do the same number of batteries more than once.

  9. Add a new data set to the graph of Current vs. Voltage from part 1.  Do not do a brand new graph.  Add this line to the graph you have already placed in your lab book and make sure it has all the things a good graph should contain including an equation.

    How to do multiple data sets



  10. Give one sentence describing how the slope of your graph changes as you change the resistance of the resistor.  Call your teacher over to look at your graph on your computer before you quit out of it.  In order to get credit for this graph, you must have two different data sets, the x and y axes must be properly labeled and you need to have a key visible on the computer so I now which line goes with which resistor.  It goes without saying that the graphs must have equations with them.

Part 3:  Resistance
  1. Click on your battery box and generate new battery packs until you have one with four batteries. You will not change this for all of part 3 in this lab.

  2. Create a data table that lists the colors on your resistor, the resistance of your resistor, the current (mA), and the current (A).  Give enough rows for 8 different trials.

  3. Measure the current through your resistor and then change the resistor and measure the current again.  Repeat this for 8 unique combinations of resistor colors.

  4. Create a graph of Current in Amps vs. Resistance.  Copy the graph to your lab book and make sure it has all the things a good graph should contain including an equation.

  5. Give one sentence describing the relationship between the current and resistance in a circuit.

Part 4:  Resistance with different batteries
  1. Click on your battery box and generate new battery packs until you have one with only 2 batteries. You will not change this for all of part 4 in this lab.

  2. Create a data table that lists the colors on your resistor, the resistance of your resistor, the current (mA), and the current (A).  Give enough rows for 8 different trials.

  3. Measure the current through your resistor and then change the resistor and measure the current again.  Repeat this for 8 unique combinations of resistor colors.

  4. Add a new data set to the graph of Current vs. Resistance from part 3.  Do not do a brand new graph.  Add this curve to the graph you have already placed in your lab book and make sure it has all the things a good graph should contain including an equation.

  5. Give one sentence describing the relationship between the batteries you are using and A value of your graphs.   Call your teacher over to look at your graph on your computer before you quit out of it.  In order to get credit for this graph, you must have two different data sets, the x and y axes must be properly labeled and you need to have a key visible on the computer so I now which line goes with which resistor.  It goes without saying that the graphs must have equations with them.
Part 5:  Building the Circuit for Real
  1. Your teacher will be giving you the materials you will be needing to build this circuit for real.  While you are waiting for your chance to build this circuit, answer the questions found here.


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