Bonham Wetland
Bonham Wetland was cleaned up and enhanced by several techniques.  Invasive species were removed from the site to encourage native plant material growth.  Excavation and reconstruction of the wetlands by providing channeling , erosion blankets, mulch, netting, and rip rap, and installing a new tile outlet, provided the wetland with a healthier environment to continue to be a refuge for wildlife.  By utilizing these simple techniques this wetland will thrive and function to aid in the microclimate and natural diversity of this area.

Green Roof
Minnetrista has the first extensive green roof installation in East Central Indiana. It is located on the west pergola roof covering the main entry to The Minnetrista Center Building. This highly visible location allows the visitor to see up close the different varieties of sedum plants and the various wildlife that visit the roof.  Scientific instruments collect data from the green roof and the opposite gravel ballast roof. The data illustrates the green roof stays cooler in the summer and warmer in the winter, while the gravel ballast roof experiences more extreme temperature changes. The green roof also slows down more storm water from leaving the roof than the gravel ballast roof. In addition, the green roof provides a habitat for butterflies, praying mantis, and birds and is aesthetically more attractive than gravel. Come see it out for yourself!www.minnetrista.net/experience/gardens/themegardens/greenroof

John Craddock Wetland
The John M. Craddock Wetland Nature Preserve is located in the center of Muncie, Indiana, next to former industrial sites and adjacent to the White River. The Wetland Nature Preserve began as a gift of land to the City of Muncie to honor John M. Craddock’s life-long public service commitment to saving and reviving the White River and the wildlife along its corridor. The Wetland Nature Preserve is envisioned as being an inner city habitat area for flora and fauna, an outdoor educational facility and a passive respite located along the White River Greenway. A looped trail with an elevated boardwalk will guide trail users, nature enthusiasts, educators and students through emergent and scrub-shrub wetlands, mesic prairies and an upland wooded area to interpretive stations, overlooks and a nature center.

Prairie Creek Demonstration Rain Garden and Roof Capture
Prairie Creek Reservoir is of great importance to the residents of Delaware County and the surrounding area.  However, it has severe bank erosion and the formation of gullies due to unmanaged runoff, which creates a direct route for sediment and other pollutants to enter the reservoir. This is a large project that will be funded by a grant from the Indiana Natural Resources Foundation, the existing Community Foundation and Ball Brothers Foundation Grants, funds from the Muncie City Parks Department, and 319 cost share funds.  In addition to the Rain Swale, a portion of the bank, and another swale was created to manage stormwater.  The Prairie Creek Rain Swale is a large area that has been placed above the beach area to capture and slowly release rainwater that currently erodes away the beach every year.  Approximately 125 tons of sand is washed into the reservoir yearly due to large areas such as the gravel parking lot draining towards the beach.

North Street Urban Garden
The North Street Urban Garden is located on the corner of East North Street and Jefferson Street.  The goal of this project was to demonstrate rain capture and reuse for the neighborhood along in context of is greater mission to advocate community-based backyard garden to the community.  Sheetflow is captured from a constructed shed roof structure and used for general water needs on site. Participants can grow community and local organic food in this space for their neighbors and local food kitchens.  The structure is also a great space for teaching, learning, and sharing.

Prairie Creek Master Plan
The Prairie Creek Master Plan was developed by the Muncie-Delaware County Metropolitan Plan Commission with the assistance of many public agencies, community groups, and individuals. The plan was adopted by the Plan Commission, Parks Board, and the County Commissioners in June of 2007.

Hutchinson Pervious Driveway
A 1380 square foot permeable driveway was installed at the Hutchinson’s house. The homeowners agree to maintain it according to manufacturer’s specifications for 10 years. Despite some issues with settling and cracking due to contractor error, the driveway is in good shape.

Steven O’Dell Residue & Tillage Management No-till
No-till attachments for mulch tillage on conventional corn and no-till beans were installed on one of the farmer’s tractors. The farmer entered into an agreement with the SWCD to promote this on the field for 5 years. A nutrient management plan is on file.

Paul Russell Residue & Tillage Management No-till
No-till attachments for no-till corn were installed on one of the farmer’s tractors. The farmer entered into an agreement with the SWCD to promote this on the field for 5 years. A nutrient management plan is on file.

Mark Smithson Russell Residue & Tillage Management No-till
Row cleaners, fertilizer combo for no-till beans and corn were installed on one of the farmer’s tractors. The farmer entered into an agreement with the SWCD to promote this on the field for 5 years. A nutrient management plan is on file.

Cardinal Greenway Inc. eroded ditch repair
An eroded ditch was strengthened and repaired using the Rosgen Method and vegetative practices. The Cardinal Greenway agrees to maintain the site for at least 5 years. A survey and pebble count was conducted. Based upon that information, it was determined that the stream was a G6 in the Rosgen Classification system, with a sinuosity of >1.2, an entrenchment ratio of <1.4, a width to depth ratio of <12, and a slope of .02-.039. Using the regional curve for Ohio and the drainage area (.001 square miles), it was determined that the stream should be a B5 type stream. This type has a sinuosity of >1.2, an entrenchment ratio of 1.4-2.2, a width to depth ratio of >12, and a slope of .02-.039. Despite the slope for both classes being the same range, the stream’s slope changed from 0.03 to 0.028. Using this information, the stream was redesigned to meet these criteria. Live stakes, brush layering, coir logs, erosion fabric, and native herbaceous vegetation will strengthen the channel, reducing the extremity and effects of future erosion.

Muncie Parks Department Prairie Creek large swale repair and erosion control
A rapidly eroding swale was repaired using the Rosgen Method and check dams. The City of Muncie agrees to maintain the site for at least 5 years. A large swale was reengineered to the appropriate sinuosity and grade. Various check dams, both natural and manufactured, were installed to slow water and cause sediment to drop out. Live stakes, erosion fabric, and native vegetation will strengthen the new channel.

Muncie Parks Department Prairie Creek small swale repair and erosion control
A smaller swale was repaired using the Rosgen method and check dams. The City of Muncie agrees to maintain the site for at least 5 years. Erosion will be halted by erosion fabric, live stakes, and native herbaceous vegetation.

Muncie Parks Department Prairie Creek bank repair and erosion control
A rapidly eroding bank was repaired using coir logs and vegetative practices. The City of Muncie agrees to maintain the site for at least 5 years. Native vegetation, erosion fabric, coir logs, and live stakes will help strengthen the bank and the slope leading up to it.

Muncie Sanitary District 18th and Macedonia
Through the INAFSM Awards Nomination, the federal Stormwater Phase II requirements prompted the Muncie Sanitary District to establish a dedicated stormwater division.  The benchmark project of the initial capital improvement program was the 18th Street and Macedonia Avenue Neighborhood Project.  This project utilized effective stormwater management to transform an existing neighborhood from one that suffered for decades with standing water and deteriorated property values into a revitalization area in which the residents now take great pride.  The main system comprised of negotiating with 72 individual property owners to obtain easements- without compensation- to install the stormwater collection system.  The MSD used Clean Water Act Section 319 cost-share grant funds to construct the bio-swales on private property to protect water quality.  These positive results will serve the residents for many years and be a model project for future improvements.

Prairie Creek Stormwater Swales
Prairie Creek Reservoir is of great importance to the residents of Delaware County and the surrounding area.  However, it has severe bank erosion and the formation of gullies due to unmanaged runoff, which creates a direct route for sediment and other pollutants to enter the reservoir.     This is a large project that will be funded by a grant from the Indiana Natural Resources Foundation, the existing Community Foundation and Ball Brothers Foundation Grants, funds from the Muncie City Parks Department, and 319 cost share funds.  In addition to the Rain Swale, a portion of the bank, and another swale was created to manage stormwater.  The Prairie Creek Rain Swale is a large area that has been placed above the beach area to capture and slowly release rainwater that currently erodes away the beach every year.  Approximately 125 tons of sand is washed into the reservoir yearly due to large areas such as the gravel parking lot draining towards the beach.  Minor grading changes were created so that the land would slope towards the garden will force the sheet flow to enter the area.  This redirection of stormwater also aided in the reduction of sediment entering the reservoir from the parking lot and gravel drive.  A ditch and pipe running from the driveway to the garden will collect the water coming from that area.  The Rain Swale has a variety of native sedges, grasses, and forbs that will create beautiful aesthetics adjacent to the bath house and a functional living system to manage stormwater.This cost-share project and others at Prairie Creek will be maintained by the Muncie Parks Department and promote a healthy and clean reservoir.

Prairie Creek Bank Restoration Two
Prairie Creek Reservoir is of great importance to the residents of Delaware County and the surrounding area.  However, it has severe bank erosion and the formation of gullies due to unmanaged runoff, which creates a direct route for sediment and other pollutants to enter the reservoir.    This is a large project that will be funded by a grant from the Indiana Natural Resources Foundation, the existing Community Foundation and Ball Brothers Foundation Grants, funds from the Muncie City Parks Department, and 319 cost share funds.  In addition to the bank restoration, two other rain swales were created to manage stormwater.  The project was the repair of a 200 foot eroded bank that ran along one of the arms of the reservoir.  The bank had greater than one to one slopes and there were areas where large amounts of soil had sloughed into the water.  Coir logs were placed along the bank and vegetation was placed around the logs.  The logs will help to protect the bank as the native sedges grow and develop healthy root systems.  Other native plants were seeded along the bank and erosion fabric was placed to hold the hillside together while the plants develop. The potential pollutant reduction for this rain swale, assuming 90% efficiency, would be 18.9 ton/year Sediment; 21.7 lbs/year Phosphorus; and 43.5 lbs/year Nitrogen.  These estimates do not include potential additional reduction by the native vegetation.  This cost-share project and others at Prairie Creek will be maintained by the Muncie Parks Department and promote a healthy and clean reservoir.