KEY WEST STYLE DECOR : STYLE DECOR

Key west style decor : Office cube decoration : Wall decor plates.

Key West Style Decor


key west style decor
    key west
  • A city in southern Florida, on Key West Island, at the southern tip of the Florida Keys; pop. 24,832. It is the southernmost city in the continental U.S
  • Key West was a short-lived 1993 hour long comedy-drama television series set in Key West, Florida. Thirteen episodes aired on Fox between January and June 1993. It was created by David Beaird and Allan Marcil.
  • a town on the westernmost of the Florida keys in the Gulf of Mexico
  • Key West is a city in Monroe County, Florida, United States. The city encompasses the island of Key West, the part of Stock Island north of U.S.
    style
  • A manner of doing something
  • designate by an identifying term; "They styled their nation `The Confederate States'"
  • manner: how something is done or how it happens; "her dignified manner"; "his rapid manner of talking"; "their nomadic mode of existence"; "in the characteristic New York style"; "a lonely way of life"; "in an abrasive fashion"
  • A way of using language
  • A way of painting, writing, composing, building, etc., characteristic of a particular period, place, person, or movement
  • make consistent with a certain fashion or style; "Style my hair"; "style the dress"
    decor
  • The furnishing and decoration of a room
  • Interior design is a multi-faceted profession in which creative and technical solutions are applied within a structure to achieve a built interior environment.
  • The decoration and scenery of a stage
  • interior decoration: decoration consisting of the layout and furnishings of a livable interior
  • The style of decoration of a room, building
key west style decor - Wallmonkeys Peel
Wallmonkeys Peel and Stick Wall Graphic - Key West, Florida from the Air - 18"W x 14"H
Wallmonkeys Peel and Stick Wall Graphic - Key West, Florida from the Air - 18"W x 14"H
WallMonkeys wall graphics are printed on the highest quality re-positionable, self-adhesive fabric paper. Each order is printed in-house and on-demand. WallMonkeys uses premium materials & state-of-the-art production technologies. Our white fabric material is superior to vinyl decals. You can literally see and feel the difference. Our wall graphics apply in minutes and won't damage your paint or leave any mess. PLEASE double check the size of the image you are ordering prior to clicking the 'ADD TO CART' button. Our graphics are offered in a variety of sizes and prices.
WallMonkeys are intended for indoor use only.
Printed on-demand in the United States Your order will ship within 3 business days, often sooner. Some orders require the full 3 days to allow dark colors and inks to fully dry prior to shipping. Quality is worth waiting an extra day for!
Removable and will not leave a mark on your walls.
'Fotolia' trademark will be removed when printed.
Our catalog of over 10 million images is perfect for virtually any use: school projects, trade shows, teachers classrooms, colleges, nurseries, college dorms, event planners, and corporations of all size.

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Barrymore Theater
Barrymore Theater
Midtown Manhattan, New York City, New York, United States The Barrymore Theater survives today as one of the historic theater interiors that symbolize American theater for both New York and the nation. Built at the end of the 1920s, the Barrymore was among the numerous theaters constructed by the Shubert Organization, to the designs of Herbert J. Krapp, that typified the development !of the Times Square/Broadway theater district. Founded .by the three brothers Sam S., Lee and J.J. Shubert, the Shubert organization was the dominant shaper of New York's theater district. Beginning as producers, the brothers expanded into the building of theaters as well, and eventually helped cover the blocks east and west of Broadway in Midtown with legitimate stage theaters. Herbert J. Krapp, who designed almost all the Shuberts' post-World War I theaters, was the most prolific architect of the Broadway theater district. Having worked in the offices of Herts & Tallant, premier theater designers of the pre-war period, Krapp went on to design theaters for the two maj or bui1ders of the post-war era, the Shubert and Chanin organizations. The Barrymore represents a typical and important aspect of the nation's theatrical history. Latest, among those surviving, of the theaters constructed for the Shuberts in the Broadway district, it was built in honor of, and named for, the Shuberts' star performer, Ethel Barrymore. Beyond its historical importance, the Barrymore's facade is an exceptionally handsome design. For half a century the Barrymore Theater has served as home to countless numbers of the plays through which the Broadway theater has come to personify American theater. As such, it continues to help define the Broadway theater district, the largest and most famous concentration of legitimate stage theaters in the world. Herbert J. Krapp The character of today's Broadway theater district owes more to architect Herbert J. Krapp (1883-1973) than to any other architect. He designed sixteen of the extant Broadway theaters (almost half the total), fourteen of which are in active theatrical use, as well as five that have been demolished. Despite his enormous output, however, little is known today of his life and work. Herbert Krapp's career coincided with the rise of the Shubert organization as the major force in the New York theater. Upon his graduation from Cooper Union, Krapp joined the office of noted theater architects Henry Herts and Hugh Tallant, who had designed some of the handsomest early twentieth-century theaters in New York, including the Lyceum (1903), New Amsterdam (1902-03), Helen Hayes (1911, demolished), and Longacre (1912-13), According to Krapp's daughter, the partners were becoming increasingly debilitated by morphine addiction, and gradually entrusted Krapp with responsibility for design and office operations. Be that as It may, when the Shuberts next decided to build new theaters, in 1916, they turned to Krapp for designs, and proceeded to commission from him a dozen theaters in Times Square In as many years (1916-1928). Throughout his professional career Krapp remained the preferred Shubert architect. He designed their theaters In New York, Boston, Philadelphia and elsewhere, supervised Shubert theater alterations nationwide, and was even the architect for their private residences. Besides his twelve Shubert theaters, Krapp designed nine other Times Square houses. Six, built between 1924 and 1927, were for the Chanin Construction Company. Only three, the Alvin, the Hammerstein (now the Ed Sullivan), and the Waldorf (demolished) were designed for independent interests. A bril 1 iant acoustician and gifted architect of great invention, Krapp was responsible for scores of theaters throughout New York City and State (including three movie houses in Queens: the Sunnyside in Woodside and the Jackson and the Boulevard In Jackson Heights) and others stretching from Palm Beach to Detroit. His office records document alterations to literally hundreds of theaters across the country. Krapp's Broadway theaters closely reflect the interest and needs of a new breed of theatrical entrepreneur, the large-scale speculative owner/builder. Prior to the rise of the Shuberts as major theater owners, most theaters had been erected for independent impresarios, including Oscar Hammerstein who built the first Times Square theater and whose Victory Theater (1899) still stands on 42nd Street, Daniel Frohman who built the Lyceum (1903), Charles Dillingham who built the Lunt-Fontanne (1910), and David Belasco and John Cort who built the theaters that bear their names (1907 and 1912). At the turn of the century, Klaw and Erlanger's Theatrical Syndicate dominated most of the Times Square theaters, but did not sponsor a unified building campaign as the Shuberts eventually did. Since the Shuberts were building theaters largely as financial ventures, most of their buildings tended to be simpler than those designed for the imp
Whitehall (Henry M. Flagler House)
Whitehall (Henry M. Flagler House)
A National Historic Landmark Also known as Henry Morrison Flagler House Palm Beach County, FL Listed: 12/05/1972 Designated an NHL: 02/16/2000 Whitehall, a marble mansion of the Gilded Age, was constructed on the west side of the island of Palm Beach, Florida, in 1900-1901. It is a two-and-a-half story monumental residence designed in the Neoclassical Revival style by Carrere and Hastings, the distinguished New York architectural firm. The style of the building and its proportions are more characteristic and reminiscent of a large civic building than a private dwelling. Whitehall has a monumental entrance portico with six colossal Roman Doric columns at the center of its front facade. The building's two-and-a-half story five-bay central section, with side gabled roof and paired chimneys in the parapeted end walls, is flanked on both sides by two-story one-bay sections with hipped roofs. Red terra cotta barrel tiles roof both the gable and hipped roof sections, providing a colorful and prominent Mediterranean feature in contrast to other building materials and features that are predominantly white and classical. Whitehall, the winter home of Henry Morrison Flagler in Palm Beach, Florida, is nationally significant for its association with Flagler, one of the captains of industry and commerce during the late 19th and early 20th centuries (the so-called robber barons). The residence also has architectural significance at the national level as an exceptional Neoclassical Revival marble palace of the Gilded Age. Whitehall epitomizes the luxurious American country houses of the turn-of-the-century which displayed their owner's fabulous wealth through monumental architecture. Henry Flagler made his fortune during the period immediately after the Civil War. He was one of John D. Rockefeller's two original partners and a founder of the Standard Oil Company in 1870, the world's first and greatest oil monopoly. "By 1884, Standard's position was virtually impregnable," and Flagler found a new challenge that became his second remarkable career, the development of the State of Florida. It was the last American frontier east of the mighty Mississippi. Flagler built a railroad all the way down Florida's east coast. The Florida East Coast Railway ran 522 miles from Jacksonville (just south of the Georgia state line) to Key West, the southernmost city in the United States . It took 27 years to complete the entire system. Along the way, Flagler established new towns, improved existing ones, built hotels, resorts, schools, and churches, and established utility companies, newspapers, steamship lines, land development companies, and agricultural experimental farms. Flagler and his railroad linked vacationers to resorts, settlers to homesteads and new farm lands, and produce to market. They were the catalysts that created modern Florida and its main industries, tourism and agriculture. Flagler "financed this venture out of his own wealth, an act unprecedented in the annals of American history." "He may have been America's most modest industrial titan - and its most underappreciated,” claimed a recent article in Audacity: the Magazine of Business Experience. Whitehall is an exceptional American country house of the Gilded Age. Carrere and Hastings' 55-room, 60,000 square-foot marble palace was designed with interior spaces ranging in decor from Francois I to Art Nouveau and Modern American (sporting Florida's first twin beds), and equipped with American technology's most up-to-date modern conveniences (recessed electric lighting, luxurious plumbing). "More wonderful than any palace in Europe, grander and more magnificent than any other private dwelling in the world," gushed a writer for the New York Herald at Whitehall's debut. "Its exterior gives no suggestion of its glories of interior decoration and ornamentation ... In the grouping of sculpture, tapestry, rugs, antique furniture, ceramics, bronzes and panels there is nothing in the world to equal Whitehall."

key west style decor
key west style decor
Wallmonkeys Peel and Stick Wall Graphic - Key West Seabird in Flight - 24"H x 16"W
WallMonkeys wall graphics are printed on the highest quality re-positionable, self-adhesive fabric paper. Each order is printed in-house and on-demand. WallMonkeys uses premium materials & state-of-the-art production technologies. Our white fabric material is superior to vinyl decals. You can literally see and feel the difference. Our wall graphics apply in minutes and won't damage your paint or leave any mess. PLEASE double check the size of the image you are ordering prior to clicking the 'ADD TO CART' button. Our graphics are offered in a variety of sizes and prices.
WallMonkeys are intended for indoor use only.
Printed on-demand in the United States Your order will ship within 3 business days, often sooner. Some orders require the full 3 days to allow dark colors and inks to fully dry prior to shipping. Quality is worth waiting an extra day for!
Removable and will not leave a mark on your walls.
'Fotolia' trademark will be removed when printed.
Our catalog of over 10 million images is perfect for virtually any use: school projects, trade shows, teachers classrooms, colleges, nurseries, college dorms, event planners, and corporations of all size.

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