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Wednesday, July 6, 2016

The Hoax of Mental Illness: Stick Out Your Thought And Say "Ahhh!"  


How does one differentiate/diagnose an 'ill' thought from a 'well' thought? Is my desire to kill someone intrinsically 'ill'? Not if I'm defending myself or my family from someone with intent to murder. However, if I believe someone to have intent of murdering me but that person is behaving peacefully, then one can rightly diagnose my thoughts to kill as being caused by schizophrenia. We therefore see there is no such thing as an 'ill' thought, since an 'ill' thought is a 'well' thought in another setting, but we do see there is such a thing as schizophrenia, which is caused by a chemical imbalance in the brain, and is treated with drugs.

Or put another way…

If I defend myself by killing someone who is trying to kill me, how does that though to kill differ from someone who has the same thought to kill but is suffering from schizophrenia, where the person he believes is trying to kill him is actually behaving peacefully? We therefore see there is no such thing as an 'ill' thought, since an 'ill' thought is a 'well' thought in another setting, but we do see there is such a thing as schizophrenia, which is caused by a chemical imbalance in the brain, and is treated with drugs. By definition a thought can never be ill, only the physical brain can be ill. Thoughts are neither  ‘well’ nor ‘ill’. Thoughts are merely representations of what we believe reality to be, and that perception of reality can be adversely affected by a neurological illness, not a mental illness. Medical science has no jurisdiction over thoughts.

One’s emotions, too, are representations of what we believe reality to be, whether the reality is based on internal stimuli or external stimuli. For example, feelings of paranoia can be based on concerns that are real or totally imagined, but an imagined concern cannot be called ill since the same paranoid feeling in another setting is ‘well’.  Emotions are neither  ‘well’ nor ‘ill’. Emotions are merely representations of what we believe reality to be, and that perception of reality can be adversely affected by a neurological illness, not a mental illness. Medical science has no jurisdiction over emotions.

Even critics of mental illness have failed to observe this basic principle of science. Dr. Thomas Szasz broke ground in 1961 with his psychiatry-bashing book The Myth of Mental Illness: Foundations of a Theory of Personal Conduct, seeing mental illness as the excuse a patient uses to evade life’s difficulties-expectations. Nowhere in the book, however, does Szasz mention why mental processes – thoughts and emotions – can’t be ill! 

Mental illness propagandists are Marxists, preparing for the new ‘liberated’ world, which necessitates involuntary incarceration of those who would upset Marxists’ plans. And as in all matters having to do with Marxist schemes, we have the false opposition ‘critics’ of mental illness. This false opposition tactic is what Marxists call the Scissors Strategy, in which the blades represent the two falsely opposed sides that converge on the confused victims, neutralizing true opposition to socialism, thereby allowing the advancement of socialism to the bewilderment of the true opposition.
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