Foster

 
Anthony Foster
 
1770-1790 1770-1790 Census of the Cumberland Settlements, Davidson County Census, ancestry.com -" Anthony Foster, DAR membership on this line.
 
Born 13, Mar 1741 in VA. Married 1760 in Fairfax, Culpepper Co., VA to Rose Coleman, who was born 1742.  Defender of the Western Settlements of Watauga, Holston, and Clinch.  Purchased land in Davidson Co., in 1788.  Died in Nashville, TN Nov 3, 1816.
 
Children: Anthony; John; Robert b. July 18, 1769, m. Ann S. Hubbard; Thomas; Edmund; Sarah, Hannah; daughter who married Mr. Read; daughter who married Mr. Compton; daughter who married Mr. Ray; daughter who married Mr. Long."
 

 

 
'Abstract of Early Kentucky Wills and Inventories
pg. 185, Anthony Foster witnessed will of Valentine King 22 Feb 1790. in Nelson Co., KY.
 
"Kentucky Court and Other Records" pg. 22, Anthony Foster, Jr. surveyed land for George Reading on 23 Jun 1792.
 
His name is on "The Petition of 10,000 Names" of 1771.
Virginia Genealogical Society Quarterly, Vol. 24, No. 2
 
 
"Haywood's History of Tennessee --The Civil and Political History of the State of Tennessee: From Its Earliest Settlement Up to the Year 1796" , by John Haywood, Pgs. 348 to 350
"On the 7th of December 1792, a party of cavalry in service for the protection of the District of Mero, about eight miles from Nashville, were fired upon by about twenty Indians, who put them to flight and killed John Jankins, who was scalped and his body much mangled. The Indians stole horses in this district without intermssion through all the month of December 1792.
On the 29th of December John Haggard was killed and scalped about six miles from Nashville. Twelve balls were shot into him. His wife was killed by the Indians in the summer, and he left five small children in poverty and wretchedness.
Gov. Blount, not unmindful of the instructions he had received from the President to engage the Cherokees, Choctaws, and Chickasaws to cooperate with the United States in their war against the Northwards, as they were then called, and having so far felt the pulse of the Cherokees as to discover that the application to them would not be successful, dropped the subject with them entirely. But in the spring of 1792 he wrote to the Choctaws and Chicasaws to meet him at Nashville on the 15th of June, that he might deliver the presents he had for them and that they and himself might shake hands and drink and smoke together. "Because these things," said he, "serve to make people and nations love each other." And he desired not only that the principal chiefs might attend, but also the yougn warriors, for he wished to become acquainted with them. Mr. James A. Robertson and MR. ANTHONY FOSTER were sent with his letters to these nations. They were made acquainted with the objects of the intended meeting, but were instructed carefully ti avoid mentioning what they were, and to talk in such a way as to induce in the young warriors a wish to join the United States, and, should the proposal be made by them, to encourage it.,,,Whatever Mr. Foster and Mr. Robertson might way respecting the personal regard of the Governor for him and his people he desired teh chief to believe. ...Mr. Foster, on his return, attributed to Spanish interference the failure of some of the Choctaw chiefs to attend the conferences at Nashville."
 
"Haywood's History of Tennessee --The Civil and Political History of the State of Tennessee: From Its Earliest Settlement Up to the Year 1796" by John Haywood, Pg. 452-453
 
"On the 1st of July, 1795, Col. Henly appointed Mr. Overton to take into his possesion sundry articles which the Secretary of War and of the Treasury had ordered to be delivered to Mr. Foster, to be conducted to the Cumberland River, and to be placed, on their arrival at Nashville, in the hands of some agent to be appointed by Col. Henly. subject to be issued to the order of Gen. Rovertson. These articles were six three and one-half inch howitzers, ten quarter casks of rifle powder, five hundred pounds of lead, one thousand flints--ammunition for one hundred rounds complete for each piece, including a twenty-five grape or case shot--four plow irons, with a quantity of dry goods, amounting to $2,713.44. The howitzers, farmint utensils, and goods were, he said, for the Chickasaws, and that it lay with Gen. Robertson to order them to be delivered; and as for the warlike articles, he was of the opinion that they should be delivered to the Chickasaws on their arrival at Nashville."
 
Name: Anthony Foster   Date: 12 Oct 1759   Location: Spotsylvania Co., VA Property: 787 a. in Spts. Co. Notes: This land record was originally published in "Virginia County Records - Spotsylvania County, 1721-1800, Volume I" edited by William Armstrong Crozier. Remarks: Anthony Foster of Spts. Co. to his son, Anthony Foster, junr., of sd. Co. Deed of Gift. 787 a. in Spts. Co. 5 Feb 1760. Description: Grantor Book_Date: E
 
 
 
Virginia Land, Marriage, and Probate Records, 1639-1850 
ancestry.com
about Anthony, Jr. Foster
Name: Anthony, Jr. Foster
Date: 12 Oct 1759
Location: Spotsylvania Co., VA
Property: 787 a. in Spts. Co.
Notes: This land record was originally published in "Virginia County Records - Spotsylvania County, 1721-1800, Volume I" edited by William Armstrong Crozier.
Remarks: Anthony Foster of Spts. Co. to his son, Anthony Foster, junr., of sd. Co. Deed of Gift. 787 a. in Spts. Co. 5 Feb 1760.
Description: Grantee
Book_Date: E


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