Mechanisms of Cognition & Attention (MoCA) laboratory


         



        

Recent News

PH.D. VACANCY AVAILABLE FOR FALL, 2018

I am pleased to announce that I will be accepting a graduate student in the Fall 2018. 

The University of Arkansas provides an internationally competitive education and is classified by the Carnegie Foundation as a Highest Level of Research Activity university, among only 2% of universities in America. The Department of Psychological Science is home to a major private endowment that supports its research mission, and education at the University of Arkansas is supported by the $300 million gift from the Walton Family Foundation. Graduate stipends are very competitive. The Experimental Psychology Program faculty is a diverse group of highly productive leaders in their respective fields.

The University of Arkansas is nestled in the beautiful Ozark Mountains. In 2017, Fayetteville was ranked as the 5th best place to live in the USA by US News, in part because of its friendly people, abundant state parks and community green space, as well as a vibrant arts and entertainment scene.

For detailed application information and instructions, please visit the Psychological Science Department at the University of Arkansas. Application submission deadline for early review is November 20, 2017.

 
















The research conducted at the Mechanisms of Cognition & Attention (MoCA) laboratory, directed by Dr. Darya L. Zabelina, is centered at the intersection between the psychology and neuroscience of attention, executive functions, and internally-guided cognition. Specifically, our work links traditional subfields of cognitive psychology with important under-explored processes spanning  creativity and imagination. We apply a variety of techniques, including behavioral, genetic, electrophysiological (EEG and ERP), and functional MRI (fMRI) techniques. A long-term objective is to create a theoretical foundation upon which to develop methods to enhance creative thinking and problem-solving abilities.




                            
Photo credit: nationalgeographic.com