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Check Points

OBAMACSI.COM:
Should Barack Obama be targeted for assassination or even worse assassinated, it is highly likely that checkpoints looking for weapons will be resurrected everywhere across America. Unfortunately, checkpoints are a growing trend in America as a once free nation becomes more and more like the West Bank. Checkpoints are 100% unconstitutional and serve no purpose but to harass and terrorize the American population.

1. Military Checkpoints: In cities across America, military-type checkpoints that are being resurrected. Drivers' identification is checked and those who don't have a "legitimate purpose" in the area, such as a church visit or doctor's appointment, are turned away.

2. Border Patrol Checkpoints: The United States Border Patrol operates 71 traffic checkpoints, including 32 permanent traffic checkpoints, near the southern border of the United States, as well as an unspecified number of checkpoint nears the Canadian border.

3. Soft Target Checkpoints: Security consultants state that in the near future there will be security check points entering all soft targets — like your local department store, hotels, places of worship and mass transit hubs.

4. Random Checkpoints: Under the guise of making the road safer from drunk drivers, random security checkpoints are starting to pop up everywhere in America. Ads are being run on television to program the American people that checkpoints are a good idea, despite their illegality under the Constitution of the United States.

5. TSA Checkpoints:
In a blatantly tyrannical move, the TSA (Transportation Safety Administration) is now conducting random vehicle searches on various highways throughout America. No probable cause, bold faced tyranny.


1. MILITARY CHECKPOINTS

OBAMACSI.COM:
In cities across America, military-type checkpoints that are being resurrected. Drivers' identification is checked and those who don't have a "legitimate purpose" in the area, such as a church visit or doctor's appointment, are turned away.

Title: Baghdad-Style Checkpoints In US Capital
Date:
June 8, 2008
Source:
Telegraph

Abstract: Police in Washington DC have set up vehicle checkpoint in the American capital in a controversial measure aimed at tackling a wave of gun violence.

In a move that critics have compared to the security clampdown in Baghdad, police are stopping motorists traveling through the main thoroughfare of Trinidad, a neighborhood near the National Arboretum in the city's northeast section.

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Drivers' identification are checked and those who didn't have a "legitimate purpose" in the area, such as a church visit or doctor's appointment, are turned away.

The checkpoints were set up after eight people were killed in the city last weekend.

Most of the killings occurred in the police district that includes Trinidad which has already seen 22 murders this year.

But civil liberties groups have criticized the measures and have dispatched a team of lawyers and law students to monitor the situation.

"Trinidad should not be treated like Baghdad," said Mark Thompson of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People.

The group and various other organizations have threatened legal action if residents' constitutional rights are violated.

"It seems interesting that police are willing to easily cast aside fundamental freedoms for quick-fix, lazy law enforcement tactics," said Johnny Barnes, executive director of the local American Civil Liberties Union.

Washington's police chief and mayor have insisted that the checkpoints are a legal and necessary step to stop a spike in violence.

"It would be unconscionable, maybe even a dereliction of our duty, for the police chief and I to not do something different, to not turn up the heat," said Adrian Fenty, the District of Columbia's mayor.

The checkpoints will be enforced at random hours for at least five days, though it could be extended to 10 days, police said.

Officers will search cars only if they observe guns or drugs and pedestrians will not be affected (Telegraph, 2008).

Title: Checkpoints In Iraq, Checkpoints In Pittsburgh.
Date:
September 24, 2009
Source: Prison Planet

Abstract: America, just like Iraq, is a conquered country occupied by troops manning checkpoints and searching vehicles – and as our recent article documents, this is not just for “special security events,” it’s now routine all over the U.S.

The Infowars crew are now on the ground in Pittsburgh. After first being treated as terrorists for asking military media representatives questions, they are now being targeted with LRAD sound cannons as police and national guard shout through loudspeakers that “unlawful assemblies should immediately disperse” or people will be arrested (Prison Planet, 2009).

2. BORDER PATROL CHECKPOINTS

OBAMACSI.COM:
The United States Border Patrol operates 71 traffic checkpoints, including 32 permanent traffic checkpoints near the southern border of the United States, as well as an unspecified number of checkpoint nears the Canadian border.

Title:
United States Border Patrol Interior Checkpoints
Date:
Present Day
Source:
Wikipedia

Abstract:
The United States Border Patrol operates 71 traffic checkpoints, including 32 permanent traffic checkpoints, near the southern border of the United States. The primary purpose of these inspection stations is to deter illegal immigration and smuggling activities. After 9/11 they took on the additional role of terrorism deterrence. These checkpoints are located between 25 and 75 miles of the Mexico – United States border along major U.S. highways.

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Their situation at interior locations allow them to deter illegal activities that may have bypassed official border crossings along the frontier. The checkpoints are divided among nine Border Patrol sectors: west to east, these are San Diego, El Centro, Yuma, Tucson, El Paso, Marfa, Del Rio, Laredo, and Rio Grande Valley. There are a number of Border Patrol checkpoints in the northern states (such as New York or Maine), within 100 miles from the Canadian border.

Role of Checkpoints
The checkpoints are described as "the third layer in the Border Patrol's three-layer strategy", following "line watch" and "roving patrol" operations near the border. According to the U.S. General Accounting Office, "Border Patrol agents at checkpoints have legal authority that agents do not have when patrolling areas away from the border. The United States Supreme Court ruled that Border Patrol agents may stop a vehicle at fixed checkpoints for brief questioning of its occupants even if there is no reason to believe that the particular vehicle contains illegal aliens.

The Court further held that Border Patrol agents "have wide discretion" to refer motorists selectively to a secondary inspection area for additional brief questioning. In contrast, the Supreme Court held that Border Patrol agents on roving patrol may stop a vehicle only if they have reasonable suspicion that the vehicle contains aliens who may be illegally in the United States—a higher threshold for stopping and questioning motorists than at checkpoints. The constitutional threshold for searching a vehicle is the same, however, and must be supported by either consent or probable cause, whether in the context of a roving patrol or a checkpoint search".
Permanent Checkpoints along the Mexico-U.S. Border

California

1. San Clemente - located 7 miles south of San Clemente on Interstate 5.
2. Temecula - located 24 miles north of Escondido on Interstate 15.
3. I-8 West - located 3 miles east of Pine Valley on Interstate 8.
4. Highway 94 - located 24 miles east of San Diego on California State Route 94.
5. Highway 78/86 - located just south of the intersection of California State Routes 78 and 86 on northbound side.
6. Highway 111 - located between Niland and Bombay Beach.

Arizona

1. I-8 East - located 15 miles east of Yuma on Interstate 8.
2. I-19 heading North from Nogales,just north of Tubac.
3. I-10 Heading West from Phoenix, just east of Blythe, California
4. Hwy 90 heading north from Whetstone to Benson.
5. Hwy 80 heading north from Tombstone to Benson.

New Mexico

1. I-10 West - located 22 miles west of Las Cruces on Interstate 10.
2. Truth or Consequences - located 11 miles south of Truth or Consequences on Interstate 25.05.68″W
3. US 70 East - located of 50 miles East of Las Cruces on U.S. Route 70.

Texas

1. Sierra Blanca - located 5 miles west of Sierra Blanca on Interstate 10.
2. Eagle Pass - located 11 miles east of Eagle Pass on U.S. Route 57.
3. Eagle Pass/Carrizo Springs - located 30 miles West Southwest of Eagle Pass, Texas on U.S. Route 277.
4. Bracketville/Uvalde - located 60 miles east of Del Rio, Texas on Highway 90.
5. New I-35 - located 30 miles north of Laredo on Interstate 35.
6. Freer - located 16 miles west of Freer on U.S. Route 59.
7. Oilton - located 6 miles east of Oilton on Highway 359.
8. Falfurias - located 14 miles south of Falfurrias on U.S. Highway 281.
9. Sarita - located 14 miles south of Sarita on U.S. Route 77.
10. Hebbronville - located 1 mile south of Hebbronville on TX 16 S
11. Alpine - located 10 miles south of Alpine on U.S. Route 118.

Tactical Checkpoints: In fiscal year 2008, thirty-nine tactical checkpoints were in operation. Tactical checkpoints lack permanent buildings, and "support permanent checkpoints by monitoring and inspecting traffic on secondary roads that the Border Patrol determined are likely to be used by illegal aliens or smugglers to evade apprehension at permanent checkpoints." A tactical checkpoint might consist of vehicles, traffic cones, signs, a portable water supply, a cage for canines (if deployed), and portable rest facilities.

Due to Congressional restrictions against the funding of permanent checkpoints in the Tucson sector, all of its checkpoints are tactical checkpoints. These were required to relocate every seven days, amended to every 14 days in 2005. Due to the need for road shoulder space and restrictions on placing checkpoints near curves, the number of sites is limited, and the relocation in practice means that checkpoints are periodically shut down. In 2005, the median tactical checkpoint nationally was active for 2 hours daily, as opposed to over 23 hours daily for permanent checkpoints; however the Tucson sector's checkpoint on Highway 19 was active 22 hours daily.

A draft plan for the I-19 checkpoint in 2009 proposed to model it on the largest previous permanent checkpoint, the I-35 checkpoint north of Laredo, Texas, but would surpass it in size (18 acres) and inspection lanes (8 primary, 7 secondary). A number of community concerns were addressed, such as placement of canopies for dark sky restrictions for a local observatory, off-highway location, rumble strips, signage, and mitigation of traffic congestion. A community recommendation to "seek to mitigate noise" was to be "researched and considered" (Wikipedia, 2011).

3. SOFT TARGET CHECKPOINTS

OBAMACSI.COM:
Security consultants state that in the near future there will be security check points entering all soft targets — like your local department store, hotels, places of worship and mass transit hubs. 

Title: Expert: Security Checkpoints Near Soft Targets May Soon Become The Norm
Date: May 3, 2011
Source: CBS News

AbstractA Day May Come When You'll Be Patted Down Going Into Stores.

Counter terrorism experts say a retaliation attack for Osama bin Laden’s death is inevitable. Terrorists are expected to aim for more vulnerable soft targets like shopping malls or museums.

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They are places jam-packed with people — pedestrian malls, shopping centers and stadiums.

“Yeah, I feel safe. But of course in the back of my head I know that things can happen,” one person told CBS 2’s Hazel Sanchez.

Counter terrorism expert Juval Aviv said terrorists seeking revenge for Osama bin Laden’s death will turn to attacks less dramatic than the destruction on Sept. 11 — focusing instead on soft targets like hotels, places of worship and mass transit hubs.

“It’s easier and less complicated to carry out,” Aviv said. “What they’re going to achieve if they’re successful is to kill as many people as possible.”

Security consultant David Boehm said the future could include security check points entering all soft targets — like your local department store. Boehm said even with a police presence, the areas are vulnerable.

“The reason they’re called ‘soft’ is because it’s so easily accessible to anyone. There has to be security checks for the safety of all people,” Broehm said.

Added security is a turn-off for some New Yorkers.

“There’s a police presence and they search someone with a backpack. Somebody that looks suspicious, but it’s random. I would go if that if that is the case; not if everybody is being searched,” one New Yorker said. “It’s better to be safe than to be sorry,” another person said.

Despite the challenges to secure high-volume soft targets like Times Square, security experts said one of the best lines of defense is already in place and doesn’t cost a thing.

“We are millions and millions of eyes and ears. We need to assist the police. We need to assist each other and keep each other safe,” Boehm said.

It’s freedom, coming with an increasingly heavy price (CBS News, 2011)

4. RANDOM CHECKPOINTS

OBAMACSI.COM:
Under the guise of making the road safer from drunk drivers, random security checkpoints are starting to pop up everywhere in America. Ads are being run on television to program the American people that checkpoints are a good idea, despite their illegality under the Constitution of the United States. 

Title: Random Checkpoints
Date:
Present
Source:
Wikipedia

Abstract:
The Fourth Amendment to the United States Constitution states that: “The right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures, shall not be violated, and no Warrants shall issue, but upon probable cause, supported by Oath or affirmation, and particularly describing the place to be searched, and the persons or things to be seized.”

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At a sobriety checkpoint, drivers are necessarily stopped without reasonable suspicion, and may be tested summarily and without probable cause. Thus the Constitution would appear to prohibit people from being stopped without a search warrant or at least without probable cause that they have committed a crime; however, the warrant requirement only attaches should the search be unreasonable and the Supreme Court, as shown below, decided that such stops are not unreasonable under certain circumstances.

Driving under the Influence of alcohol is a special type of crime, as driving with a blood alcohol content (BAC) over a set limit is defined as the crime; it is not necessary to drive recklessly or cause an accident in order to be convicted. To determine BAC accurately, it is generally necessary for the driver to subject themselves to tests that are self incriminating, and drivers sometimes exercise their right against self incrimination to refuse these tests.

To discourage this, some jurisdictions set the legal penalties for refusing a BAC test to equal or worse than those for a failing a BAC test. In other jurisdictions, the legal system may consider refusing the roadside alcohol breath test to be probable cause, allowing police to arrest the driver and conduct an involuntary BAC test. The Michigan Supreme Court had found sobriety roadblocks to be a violation of the Fourth Amendment.

However, by a 6-3 decision in Michigan Dept. of State Police v. Sitz (1990), the United States Supreme Court found properly conducted sobriety checkpoints to be constitutional. While acknowledging that such checkpoints infringed on a constitutional right, Chief Justice Rehnquist argued the state interest in reducing drunk driving outweighed this minor infringement.

Dissenting justices argued that the Constitution doesn’t provide exceptions. "That stopping every car might make it easier to prevent drunken driving...is an insufficient justification for abandoning the requirement of individualized suspicion", dissenting Justice Brennan insisted.

Chief Justice Rehnquist argued that an exception was justified because sobriety roadblocks were effective and necessary. On the other hand, dissenting Justice Stevens countered that "the findings of the trial court, based on an extensive record and affirmed by the Michigan Court of Appeals, indicate that the net effect of sobriety checkpoints on traffic safety is infinitesimal and possibly negative."

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Jurisdictions that allow sobriety checkpoints often carve out specific exceptions to their normal civil protections, in order to allow sobriety checkpoints.

Although the U.S. Supreme Court has found sobriety checkpoints to be constitutionally permissible, ten states (Idaho, Iowa, Michigan, Minnesota, Oregon, Rhode Island, Texas, Washington, Wisconsin, and Wyoming) have found that sobriety roadblocks violate their own state constitutions or have outlawed them.

Two other states (Alaska and Montana) do not use checkpoints even though they have not made them illegal.

Legal Guidelines for Checkpoint Procedures: In approving "properly conducted" checkpoints, Chief Justice Rehnquist implicitly acknowledged that there must be guidelines in order to avoid becoming overly intrusive.

In other words, checkpoints cannot simply be set up when, where and how police officers choose. As often happens in Supreme Court decisions, however, the Chief Justice left it to the states to determine what those minimal safeguards must be, presumably to be reviewed by the courts on a case-by-case basis.

In an effort to provide standards for use by the states, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration subsequently issued a report that reviewed recommended checkpoint procedures in keeping with federal and state legal decisions.

("The Use of Sobriety Checkpoints for Impaired Driving Enforcement", DOT HS-807-656, Nov. 1990) An additional source of guidelines can be found in an earlier decision by the California Supreme Court (Ingersoll v. Palmer (43 Cal.3d 1321 (1987)) wherein the Court set forth what it felt to be necessary standards in planning and administering a sobriety checkpoint:

1. Decision making must be at a supervisory level, rather than by officers in the field.
2. A neutral formula must be used to select vehicles to be stopped, such as every vehicle or every third vehicle, rather than leaving it up the officer in the field.
3. Primary consideration must be given to public and officer safety.
4. The site should be selected by policy-making officials, based upon areas having a high incidence of drunk driving.
5. Limitations on when the checkpoint is to be conducted and for how long, bearing in mind both effectiveness and intrusiveness.
6. Warning lights and signs should be clearly visible.
7. Length of detention of motorists should be minimized.
8. Advance publicity is necessary to reduce the intrusiveness of the checkpoint and increase its deterrent effect.

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Effectiveness: The Centers for Disease Control, in a 2002 Traffic Injury Prevention report, found that in general, the number of alcohol related crashes was reduced by 20% in states that implement sobriety checkpoints compared to those that do not.

Public Health Law Research, an independent organization, reported in a 2009 evidence brief summarizing the research assessing the effect of a specific law or policy on public health, that there is strong evidence supporting the effectiveness of selective breath testing sobriety checkpoints as a public health intervention aimed at reducing the harms associated with alcohol impaired driving.

The debate regarding saturation patrols versus checkpoints favors saturation patrols being more effective, both in terms of number of arrests and cost. The FBI compared saturation patrols vs. checkpoints in Ohio, Missouri, and Tennessee. The study showed that, “Overall, measured in arrests per hour, a dedicated saturation patrol is the most effective method of apprehending offenders.” Another survey found that "States with infrequent checkpoints claimed a lack of funding and police resources for not conducting more checkpoints, preferred saturation patrols over checkpoints because they were more 'productive,' and used large number of police officers at checkpoints."

There is a dearth of research regarding the deterrent effect of checkpoints. The only formally documented research regarding deterrence is a survey of Maryland's "Checkpoint Strikeforce" program. The survey found no deterrent effect: "To date, there is no evidence to indicate that this campaign, which involves a number of sobriety checkpoints and media activities to promote these efforts, has had any impact on public perceptions, driver behaviors, or alcohol-related motor vehicle crashes and injuries. This conclusion is drawn after examining statistics for alcohol-related crashes, police citations for impaired driving, and public perceptions of alcohol-impaired driving risk" (Wikipedia, 2011).

5. TSA CHECKPOINTS

OBAMACSI.COM:
In a blatantly tyrannical move, the TSA (Transportation Safety Administration) is now conducting random vehicle searches on various highways throughout America. No probable cause, bold faced tyranny.

Title:
TSA Checkpoints Now On TN Highways
Date: October 19, 2011
Source: Sky 5 News

Abstract: You're probably used to seeing TSA's signature blue uniforms at the airport, but now agents are hitting the interstates to fight terrorism with Visible Intermodal Prevention and Response (VIPR).

"Where is a terrorist more apt to be found? Not these days on an airplane more likely on the interstate," said Tennessee Department of Safety & Homeland Security Commissioner Bill Gibbons.

Tuesday Tennessee was first to deploy VIPR simultaneously at five weigh stations and two bus stations across the state.

Agents are recruiting truck drivers, like Rudy Gonzales, into the First Observer Highway Security Program to say something if they see something.

"Not only truck drivers, but cars, everybody should be aware of what's going on, on the road," said Gonzales.

It's all meant to urge every driver to call authorities if they see something suspicious.

"Somebody sees something somewhere and we want them to be responsible citizens, report that and let us work it through our processes to abet the concern that they had when they saw something suspicious," said Paul Armes, TSA Federal Security Director for Nashville International Airport.

The Tennessee Highway Patrol checked trucks with drug and bomb sniffing dogs during random inspections.

"The bottom line is this: if you see something suspicious say something about it," Gibbons said Tuesday.

The random inspections really aren't any more thorough normal, according to Tennessee Highway Patrol Colonel Tracy Trott who says paying attention to details can make a difference. Trott pointed out it was an Oklahoma state trooper who stopped Timothy McVeigh for not having a license plate after the Oklahoma City bombing in the early 1990s.

Tuesday's statewide "VIPR" operation isn't in response to any particular threat, according to officials.

Armes said intelligence indicates law enforcement should focus on the highways as well as the airports (Sky 5 News, 2011).