Being Prepared


     





















































ARE YOU READY FOR OLD MAN WINTER?
We encourage Pueblo to learn more about the best way to protect yourself this season! When it comes to threats associated with natural disaster, we are fortunate in Pueblo County to not have the coastal risks that effect many other US communities.  Even the threats of earthquake or tornado are relatively low here in Pueblo.  Some of our biggest threats are often forecast or come with some warning.  Snow or thunder storms, and even wild land fires give residents time to leave or "hunker-down" as the threat approaches.  You have opportunity to prepare your family for those risks and educate yourself on the steps to take before, during, and after the event.  With winter upon us, the first message of the PreparePueblo team in 2015 is our reminder to you to be ready for OLD MAN WINTER! 


    



































DO YOU KNOW YOUR ZONE??

The second push in the CSEPP Prepare Pueblo campaign is an important one for people living in and around the CSEPP Emergency Preparedness Zones.  This quarter the message isKNOW. Do You Know Your Zone, it replaces the first message of the Prepare Pueblo, Talk.      Emergencies can Happen Anytime.




CSEPP decided to make the most of this campaign by not only reaching out to those citizens and letting them know, there is NO RISK to them but also to remind the citizens inside the zones to make sure they know which zone they in, and what the best actions are to take should they need to evacuate or shelter during an accident.

For decades, the communities around the U.S Army Pueblo Chemical Depot have been contacted at community events, door to door, and through direct mail letting them know they have special emergency preparedness opportunities and information offered to them since they are inside the emergency preparedness zones.  What CSEPP officials have found over the years is, while people in the zones are aware of the risk and what measures they should take in the remote chance of an accident on post, the citizens in nearby Pueblo, Colorado were unaware those same risks didn't extend beyond those "zone boundaries".  When surveyed the citizens inside the city limits of Pueblo say they might have to take protective action if something were to happen on post, some even saying they will head toward the Depot to learn what to do


CSEPP zones are based off of risk and "plume modeling".  If you have questions about your zone or why your home is outside the zones, call us.  The best part of emergency preparedness is, the risks may be different but the actions you take to protect yourself and your family are often the same.  We'd love to share some emergency planning tips with you!

Do you know if you live in a CSEPP Emergency Zone?

posted Nov 17, 2016, 9:32 AM by Pueblo RCN



Knowing if you live in a response zone is key to knowing how to prepare and what to do if there is ever an emergency at the Pueblo Chemical Depot. Many of the zones don’t have people living in them (E1, W1, NW1, N2, and NW2). There are other zones that have fewer than 100 people (NE2, E2, W2, and N1).  What’s most important is that people know if they live or work in an emergency zone, which zone and what precautions they may have to take if there is an emergency at the Pueblo Chemical Depot.

It’s important to know where the emergency zones are and who is in the zones because if there is an emergency on the depot grounds, officials will instruct individuals what precautions to take based on the location of the emergency zones. 
For example: there may be an order put out that states “People living or working in Southeast 1 (SE1) should evacuate away from the U.S. Pueblo Chemical Depot now.” It would be important for those individuals living or working in that zone to know they are in the zone that is being asked to evacuate.
Without prior knowledge of the location of the emergency zones and what the specific instructions may be required of those residing or working the zones may come across as confusing. It’s important to pre-plan and know what instructions, such as “evacuate” or “shelter-in-place”, mean for you and your family. Families living in the designated emergency zones should discuss a plan in the event that there is an emergency and orders 
Families are encouraged to discuss a plan and important details, such as where family members should meet, should they have to evacuate from their home during an emergency situation.
Discussions surrounding emergency preparedness are not just for those individuals who live in a designated emergency planning zone, but should be everyone as emergencies can happen anytime and anywhere.Knowing if you live in a response zone is key to knowing how to prepare and what to do if there is ever an emergency at the Pueblo Chemical Depot. Many of the zones don’t have people living in them (E1, W1, NW1, N2, and NW2). There are other zones that have fewer than 100 people (NE2, E2, W2, and N1).  What’s most important is that people know if they live or work in an emergency zone, which zone and what precautions they may have to take if there is an emergency at the Pueblo Chemical Depot.

It’s important to know where the emergency zones are and who is in the zones because if there is an emergency on the depot grounds, officials will instruct individuals what precautions to take based on the location of the emergency zones. 
For example: there may be an order put out that states “People living or working in Southeast 1 (SE1) should evacuate away from the U.S. Pueblo Chemical Depot now.” It would be important for those individuals living or working in that zone to know they are in the zone that is being asked to evacuate.
Without prior knowledge of the location of the emergency zones and what the specific instructions may be required of those residing or working the zones may come across as confusing. It’s important to pre-plan and know what instructions, such as “evacuate” or “shelter-in-place”, mean for you and your family. Families living in the designated emergency zones should discuss a plan in the event that there is an emergency and orders 
Families are encouraged to discuss a plan and important details, such as where family members should meet, should they have to evacuate from their home during an emergency situation.
Discussions surrounding emergency preparedness are not just for those individuals who live in a designated emergency planning zone, but should be everyone as emergencies can happen anytime and anywhere.

Are You Ready for Old Man Winter?

posted Jun 24, 2016, 10:14 AM by Pueblo RCN

ARE YOU READY FOR OLD MAN WINTER?

















































We encourage Pueblo to learn more about the best way to protect yourself this season! 
When it comes to threats associated with natural disaster, we are fortunate in Pueblo County to not have the coastal risks that effect many other US communities.  Even the threats of earthquake or tornado are relatively low here in Pueblo.  Some of our biggest threats are often forecast or come with some warning.  Snow or thunder storms, and even wild land fires give residents time to leave or "hunker-down" as the threat approaches.  You have opportunity to prepare your family for those risks and educate yourself on the steps to take before, during, and after the event.  With winter upon us, the first message of the PreparePueblo team in 2015 is our reminder to you to be ready for OLD MAN WINTER! 

Do You Know Your Zone?

posted Jun 24, 2016, 10:13 AM by Pueblo RCN

The second push in the CSEPP Prepare Pueblo campaign is an important one for people living in and around the CSEPP Emergency Preparedness Zones.  This quarter the message isKNOW. Do You Know Your Zone, it replaces the first message of the Prepare Pueblo, Talk.      Emergencies can Happen Anytime.




CSEPP decided to make the most of this campaign by not only reaching out to those citizens and letting them know, there is NO RISK to them but also to remind the citizens inside the zones to make sure they know which zone they in, and what the best actions are to take should they need to evacuate or shelter during an accident.

For decades, the communities around the U.S Army Pueblo Chemical Depot have been contacted at community events, door to door, and through direct mail letting them know they have special emergency preparedness opportunities and information offered to them since they are inside the emergency preparedness zones.  What CSEPP officials have found over the years is, while people in the zones are aware of the risk and what measures they should take in the remote chance of an accident on post, the citizens in nearby Pueblo, Colorado were unaware those same risks didn't extend beyond those "zone boundaries".  When surveyed the citizens inside the city limits of Pueblo say they might have to take protective action if something were to happen on post, some even saying they will head toward the Depot to learn what to do


CSEPP zones are based off of risk and "plume modeling".  If you have questions about your zone or why your home is outside the zones, call us.  The best part of emergency preparedness is, the risks may be different but the actions you take to protect yourself and your family are often the same.  We'd love to share some emergency planning tips with you!

Could YOU?!~ Evacuation or Shelter

posted Jan 23, 2015, 9:56 AM by Pueblo RCN   [ updated Jan 23, 2015, 9:57 AM ]

This quarter PreparePueblo reminds everyone that In a disaster Officials will often tell you to  take a very specific action to protect yourself.  Evacuation is designed to get you immediately away from a threat . Shelter in Place keeps you secure indoors until the threat passes. You can be ready for either one by packing an emergency kit. Water, Food, radio, flashlight, tools... Packing a kit means extra protection and peace of mind.  A complete list of kit items is available by clicking HERE. 

Evacuate means to calmly leave a potentially hazardous area to get to a safer area. You may be asked to evacuate for a variety of emergencies like fires, floods, and hazardous materials accidents (including, but not limited to, an accident involving the chemical weapons at the Pueblo Chemical Depot). The time you have to evacuate depends on the emergency.

  • Do not assume a recommendation to evacuate is not serious. Required or ordered evacuations are rarely done because of the large work force required to enforce the order. If recommended, please evacuate.

  • Gather people and pets and leave the area immediately.

  • Take a battery powered radio with extra batteries.

  • Stay tuned to your EAS station (KCCY 96.9 FM) for official information.

  • Take your emergency supplies kit, if you have one prepared. If not, do not take time to gather one. However, be sure to take prescription medications.

  • Close and lock your home or business.

  • Do not attempt to pick up children from school or day care. School officials plan to care for children in emergencies and they may already be evacuated. (Before an emergency occurs, learn about emergency plans at schools or day care centers.)

  • Leave the area in your vehicle. If you are evacuating because of a hazardous materials accident, keep windows and doors closed. Turn off the vehicle's heater, air conditioner, and close the vents.

  • Follow designated evacuation routes or take the most efficient route away from the hazard.

  • Do not return to your home or business until officials say it is safe.

Shelter-In-Place means to remain inside a home, business, or other permanent building. You may be asked to shelter in-place for emergencies like tornadoes and hazardous materials accidents [including, but not limited to an accident involving the chemical weapons at the Pueblo Chemical Depot (PCD)]. Shelter-in-place may be recommended when there is not enough time to evacuate.

  • If you are outdoors, go inside immediately.

  • Bring pets inside if possible but do not risk your safety for your pets.

  • Listen to the EAS station (KCCY 96.9 FM) for official information.

  • Close all windows, doors, and vents.

  • Turn off heaters, air conditioners, and exhaust fans.

  • Close as many internal doors as possible and move to the most central, windowless, above-ground room in the building.

  • Wet towels, plastic sheeting, or an airtight material can be used to seal gaps where contaminated air could enter the room.

  • Do not attempt to pick up children from school or day care until directed to do so. School officials plan to care for children in emergencies, and they may already be evacuated, or sheltered. (Before an emergency occurs, learn about emergency plans at schools or day care centers.)

  • Stay inside until officials say it is safe to leave. 

Technology Works for YOU in an emergency!

posted May 28, 2014, 11:00 AM by Pueblo RCN

May is the third and final month for the most recent installment in the PreparePueblo Emergency Preparedness Campaign.  We are encouraging people to use technology to make a difference in their readiness.  Perhaps the most important step is the simplest.  Register your cell phone for an emergency by visiting pueblocountyoptin.com!  For this message, we took out billboards and radio spots encouraging Colorado Citizens to visit 911Colorado.org.  Have YOU?  If you click Pueblo from their homepage, you will be redirected to pueblocountyoptin.com and then you are only a couple of steps from getting emergency notifications from our 911 centers if there is a community or even just a neighborhood emergency near you.  

Other ways you can make technology work FOR you in a disaster?  Social media is a big one.  Local emergency agencies like the Pueblo County Emergency Services Bureau and the Pueblo Police Department have Facebook and Twitter accounts they will use during a disaster to share important information and updates.  You can create a text group for you family too, technology can help reunite you if you are separated in a crisis.  

Even if there isn't a large scale emergency, a cell phone can be a lifeline in a personal emergency.  If you are unconscious and alone, first responders often check your cell phone for an 'ICE" or In Case of Emergency Contact.  That person can rely your hospital preference, your medical history, and help make critical decisions for you.  

Take advantage of technology today!  
1. Create your ICE contacts.
2. Register @ pueblocountyoptin.com 
3. Follow Pueblo County Sheriff's Office on Facebook and Twitter.
4. Create a family group text (be sure to include an out of town contact!).
5. Can you think of more ways?  Tweet us now @ preparepueblo 

Zones @ Home, School, Work

posted Nov 25, 2013, 2:59 PM by Pueblo RCN   [ updated Nov 17, 2016, 9:25 AM ]

Knowing your CSEPP Emergency Planning Zone (EPZ) at Home means the people in your house are ready for an emergency at the Pueblo Chemical Depot.  Many of the zones don't have people living inside them (E1, W1, NW1, N2, and NW2).  Others have less than 100 people (NE2, E2, W2, and N1).  The most important thing for emergency officials isn't how many people live in the zone, it is do the people that do know WHICH zone they live in and do they already know which route to take to head away from the Depot.  

That is important because during an emergency on post, officials will tell people by zone what to do.  For example: "People living or working in Southeast 1 (SE1) should evacuate away from the U.S. Army Pueblo Chemical Depot Now."  You can see how important it is to know if you are inside SE1 when that announcement hits the radios and sirens.  Without some pre-planning people inside SE1 may not know which direction "away from the Depot" is.  That may mean some family discussion is past due.  During those discussions, it is important that people talk about how to re-unite with their family if forced to evacuate your neighborhood. 

This discussion isn't just for people living in the Emergency Planning Zones, it is for anyone because emergencies can happen anytime, anywhere.  Being prepared for the possibility of a neighborhood evacuation or other emergency just makes good sense.

PreparePueblo Kicks off

posted Nov 25, 2013, 1:32 PM by Pueblo RCN   [ updated Nov 25, 2013, 3:14 PM ]





































































































TALK. Emergency Can Happen Anytime.  Are YOU Ready?
September seemed the perfect time for the Chemical Stockpile Emergency Preparedness Program, a unit of the Pueblo County Sheriff's Office, to begin our 2 year Public Preparedness effort.  We were excited to begin our message campaign with a very simple slogan. TALK.  Everyone knows emergencies can happen anytime, but rarely do people believe an emergency will happen to them.  Here in Pueblo, we have been very lucky and avoided natural disasters for decades...but we'd like to let you in on a secret... A community crisis can happen here in Pueblo too. Is your family ready?  That will be the theme of our messages.  We'll be asking you to take simple steps to prepare - Let's do it Pueblo!  It Starts with YOU!


























-archived on 11/25/13 from PreparePueblo Home Page (original post Sept 2013)

At Home

posted Oct 15, 2009, 1:21 PM by Pueblo RCN   [ updated Aug 30, 2013, 12:22 PM ]

Pack an emergency supply kit
Perhaps the most important place you can prepare for an emergency is in your home.  There are several steps you can take that will help prepare your family for an emergency.  One of the first things emergency officials will tell you about a community disaster is, we may not be able to get to you for several days.  You will need to rely on each other and may need to do so without running water, gas, or electricity.

To prepare for that circumstance you should:
    
  Pack and emergency supply kit 
          • Basic first aid kit
          • 3 days worth of non-perishable food
          • 1 gallon of water, per person for each day you prepare for (we recommend 3 days)
          • Flashlight(s) and replacement batteries
          • Battery operated radio and replacement batteries
          • blankets and towels
          • hand tools, scissors, duct tape, etc
          • matches

At Work

posted Oct 15, 2009, 1:20 PM by Pueblo RCN   [ updated Aug 30, 2013, 12:46 PM ]

Prepare at work
Next, consider that you probably spend more time at work than you do awake at home.  If a crisis strike Pueblo, would you know what to do if you where at work when it occurred   What does your boss expect from you?  Many need to stay and continue the work they do while others are able to leave.  Even if you are able to leave work after a disaster, what would you do if the event prevented you from doing so?  Would you be able to stay at work for a long period of time if circumstances forced you to shelter there?  If you were able to go are there two routes from there to your home in case major roadways are closed?  If your family were in different parts of Pueblo, or even out of town how would you communicate your status to one another?  Here are some things you can do now that will erase those worries from your mind.

  1. Ask about your business continuity plan at work.  There is a chance your supervisors already know if you are expected to stay and work during and immediately following a disaster.
  2. Decide how long you can afford to be without pay, that is often a strong motivator for you to restore the office to business as usual.  Pushing muddy flood water out of the office may not be in your job description, but if it is necessary for a successful return to operations, consider your willingness in advance.
  3. Review some risk scenarios as a team so everyone knows what to do.  You can start with the Active Shooter video on the Pueblo County Sheriff's Office website.  It will start great discussion and give you important life safety information too!
  4. Pack a small office survival kit.  Similar to the one at home, it should have a flashlight, food, water, a change of clothes, personal hygiene items, etc.  Comforts will be a welcome site if you are shut inside your office for 20 hours because of a winter storm or other natural disaster. 
  5. Take a different way to and from work.  If a crisis shuts your business down and you are able to leave listen for road closures so you don't end up stuck in heavy traffic.  It will ease your mind to get back to your family as soon as possible.
  6. Image you can't leave and you are worried about your children and spouse because of a community level crisis...Having an out of town family member serve as a "check-in" person means that a person unaffected by the event in Pueblo has one job, and that is making sure they hear from each of you.  More about Family Communications Plans soon!

...At School

posted Oct 15, 2009, 1:20 PM by Pueblo RCN   [ updated Aug 30, 2013, 4:53 PM ]

Being comfortable with your child's school emergency plan is not easy.  During a crisis a parent wants more than anything to be near their child, to see they are not in danger and to comfort them.  Sometimes there is a conflict between those "wants" and what is actually in the best interest of a child.  Take for example a mother who hears her child's school is on lock down because of a hazardous materials spill nearby.  In a panic she rushes to the school to pick up her child.  Since the danger is in the air outside, the school, acting in the best interest of the students AND following policies already in place, can not open the door to the school.  That means the child isn't coming out until the danger has past.  Add to that the mother is now exposed to a hazardous material because she is standing outside the school.  No one wins.  We asked District 70 School officials to speak directly to parents regarding school safety.  Read what they shared with us, along with other preparedness information by clicking on the CSEPP Update Newsletter for Fall 2013.

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