Seattle Residents for Improved Pedestrian Safety 

Adopting a Crossing     Flag Instructions      Bucket Instructions   

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                                                                                                    July 2008

Seattle Residents for Improved Pedestrian Safety is a virtual, grass-roots group of anonymous Seattle residents that are helping to improve pedestrian safety through the use of crossing flags. The idea was inspired by Kirkland's highly successful PedFlag program (see article here).  Salt Lake City also has a very successful program, which contains a combination of city-maintained crossings and citizen-adopted crossings (see website, map, and brochure). The aim of this grass roots effort is to help residents install flags at intersections where they feel there is a need to improve pedestrian safety.   If you’d like to join the effort, you can adopt a crossing.  Details are discussed here. 

A brief history of the effort is contained here.   Note that, in February 2007, the Seattle Department of Transportation (SDOT) indicated that they do not endorse the use of citizen-installed flags, but will not take any action to remove them from the public right of way.  They've added a page to their website regarding crossing flags (see here).

In June 2008, SDOT initiated a 1-year pilot project to study pedestrian crossing flags at 17 locations throughout the city (see details here).  This is an excellent development, and we thank all involved for making it happen.  However, the city is unlikely to expand the number of intersections until the end of the trial.   Moreover, outcomes of this study are uncertain.  For example, if crossing flags are "approved" for use, what criteria will be used to determine where flags can be placed?  Will they will continue to allow citizen-installed flags?  Will they rely on an adopt-a-crossing concept?  They are soliciting citizen input, so please feel free to provide comments at (206) 684-7583 or walkandbike@seattle.gov.

If you have questions, comments, ideas, or feedback on your experiences, please feel free to email us at CrossingFlags@gmail.com.   We're particularly interested in where flags are installed, and how quickly the flags are disappearing.


Thanks for your interest, and spread the word!!

 

Flagged Crossings reported to date:  23