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Original Abstracts

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Bidahochi Paleogeography and Incision of the Grand Canyon

Dickinson, William R., Department of Geosciences, University of Arizona, Tucson AZ 85721


The Paleogene California River: Evidence of Mojave-Uinta paleodrainage from U-Pb ages of detrital zircons

Steven J. Davis1, William R. Dickinson2, George E. Gehrels2, Jon E. Spencer3, Timothy F. Lawton4, and Alan R. Carroll5

1 Department of Global Ecology, Carnegie Institution of Washington, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
2 Department of Geosciences, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721, USA
3 Arizona Geological Survey, 416 W. Congress St., Tucson, AZ 85701
4 Department of Geological Sciences, New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, NM 88003, USA
5 Department of Geology and Geophysics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706, USA


Cosmogenic Burial Dating of Pliocene Colorado River Sediments

Ari Matmon1, Greg M. Stock2, Darryl E. Granger3, Keith A. Howard4

1. Institute of Earth Sciences, the Hebrew University of Jerusalem Givat-Ram, Jerusalem, Israel, 91904
2. Division of Resources Management and Science, Yosemite National Park, El Portal, California 95318, USA
3. PRIME laboratory and Department of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907-1397, USA
4. United States Geological Survey, 345 Middlefield Rd., Menlo Park, California 94025, USA



David W. Marchetti, Geology Program, Western State College of Colorado, 600 N. Adams St, Gunnison, CO 81230


The Chuska Erg: Paleogeomorphic Implications of an Oligocene Sand Sea on the Colorado Plateau

Steven M. Cather, New Mexico Bureau of Geology and Mineral Resources, New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology, 801 Leroy Pl., Socorro, New Mexico 87801


One Grand Canyon But Four Mechanisms: Was it Antecedence, Superimposition, Overflow, or Piracy?


John Douglass, Paradise Valley Community College, Phoenix, Arizona


Isotopic and geologic evidence for a non-marine origin for the Miocene-Pliocene Hualapai–Bouse lake system: Results of recent investigations

Jon E. Spencer1, P. Jonathan Patchett2, Jennifer A. Roskowski2, Philip A. Pearthree1, James E. Faulds3, P. Kyle House3, David L. Dettman2

1. Arizona Geological Survey, 416 W. Congress St., #100, Tucson, AZ 85701
2. Department of Geosciences, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721
3. Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology, MS178, University of Nevada, Reno, NV 89557


Colorado River incision rate patterns in space and time--How does it all fit together?

Kelin X. Whipple, Arizona State University


Update on microfossil studies in the northern Gulf of California, Salton Trough, and Lower Colorado River

Kristin McDougall, U.S. Geological Survey, Flagstaff, Arizona


Oligocene-early Miocene incision, strike-valley development and aggradation, Mogollon Rim, Verde Valley region, Arizona-A potential Analogue for pre-Grand Canyon Development

Ronald C. Blakey, Geology, Box 4099, NAU, Flagstaff, AZ, 86011
Wayne Ranney, 816 W. Cherry Ave., Flagstaff, AZ 86001
Travis Loseke, Pioneer Natural Res. Co., 5205 N. O'Connor Blvd., Ste. 200, Irving, TX 75039


Detrital Zircon Record of Colorado River Incision

David L. Kimbrough1, Marty Grove2, George E. Gehrels3, J. Brian Mahoney4, Rebecca J.
Dorsey5, Keith A. Howard6, P. Kyle House7, Philip A. Peartree8, Karl Flessa3

1 Department of Geological Sciences, San Diego State University, San Diego, CA 92182
2 Geological & Environmental Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305
3 Department of Geosciences, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721
4 Geology Department, University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire • Eau Claire, WI 54702-4004
5 Department of Geological Sciences, University of Oregon, Eugene, OR 97403-1272
6 United States Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA 94025-3591
7 Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology, University of Nevada, Reno, NV 89557
8 Arizona Geological Survey, 416 W. Congress St. #100, Tucson, AZ 85701


Ryan Crow1, Karl Karlstrom1, and William McIntosh2

1. Dept of Earth and Planetary Sciences, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131
2. New Mexico Bureau of Geology and Mineral Tech. Geochronology Lab, 801 Leroy Place, New
Mexico Institute of Technology, Socorro, New Mexico, 87801, USA


New observations of the Bouse Formation in Chemehuevi and Parker Valleys

Daniel Malmon, Keith Howard, Jack Hillhouse
U.S. Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA 94025


Boulders Deposited by Pliocene and Pleistocene Floods on the Lower Colorado River

Keith A. Howard and Daniel V. Malmon

U.S Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA 94025


Pliocene Aggradational Sequence of the Lower Colorado River in Longitudinal Profile

Keith A. Howard
U.S. Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (khoward@usgs.gov)


Holocene Aggradation of the Lower Colorado River in Mohave Valley, California and Arizona

Keith Howard, Daniel Malmon, John McGeehin, and Peter Martin
U.S. Geological Survey


A Sediment Budget for the Colorado River

Rebecca J. Dorsey
University of Oregon


Cenozoic evolution of the Grand Canyon and the Colorado Plateau driven by mantle dynamics?

Xavier Robert1,2,3, Robert Moucha1, Peter Reiners2, Alessandro Forte1, Kelin Whipple3

1. GEOTOP, Départements des Sciences de la Terre et de l’Atmosphère, Université du Québec à Montréal, Canada
2. University of Arizona, Tucson, United States of America
3. Arizona State University, Phoenix, United States of America

Robust geologic evidence for latest Miocene-earliest Pliocene river integration via lake-spillover along the lower Colorado River: Review and New Data

P. Kyle House1, Philip A. Pearthree2,  Amy L. Brock3, John W. Bell1, Alan R. Ramelli1, James E. Faulds1, and Keith A. Howard4

1. Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology, Reno, NV
2. Arizona Geological Survey, Tucson, AZ
3. Western Illinois University, Macomb, IL
4. U.S. Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA

Powder Rim Gravel, evidence of a late Miocene, north-flowing river through the Wyoming-Colorado-Utah borderland

Charles Ferguson, Arizona Geological Survey, Tucson, AZ


Ivo Lucchitta1, Richard F. Holm2, Baerbel K. Lucchitta3

1. U.S. Geological Survey, Flagstaff, Arizona 86001, and Museum of Northern Arizona,
Flagstaff, Arizona 86001
2.Northern Arizona University, Flagstaff, Arizona 86011
3. U.S. Geological Survey, Flagstaff, Arizona 86001


The hunt for knickzones and their meaning along the Colorado— signatures of transience after integration, bed resistance, or differential uplift?

Chris Tressler, Joel Pederson, and Rob Mackley, Utah State University, Logan, UT


The Colorado Plateau bullseye of erosion and uplift—linking patterns of quantified rates, amounts, and rock strength

Joel Pederson, Chris Tressler, Scott Cragun, Rob Mackley, and Tammy Rittenour, Utah State University, Logan, UT
Joel Pederson, Utah State University, Logan, UT


Origin of the Ancestral Colorado and Gunnison Rivers and Post-10 Ma River Incision Rates in Western Colorado

Andres Aslan1 and the CREST2 working group

1. Dept. of Physical Sciences, Mesa State College, Grand Junction, CO
2. Colorado Rockies Experiment and Seismic Transect


The Muddy Creek Formation at the Mouth of the Grand Canyon: Constraint or Chimera?

Ivo Lucchitta, US Geological Survey and Museum of Northern Arizona, Flagstaff, AZ




A tale of two monoclines

Phillip G. Resor and Gus Seixas, Weslyan University


Cenozoic geology of the upper Salt River and the case for a Miocene stream exit from the southern Colorado Plateau

Andre Potochnik, Prescott College, Prescott, AZ

Brian Wernicke, California Institute of Technology


Early Cenozoic Rim Gravels of Arizona: Age, Distribution, and Geologic Significance

R.A. Young, Geological Sciences, SUNY, Geneseo, NY 14454


Proposed Evolution of Grand Canyon from the Laramide to the Present

Carol Hill, Wayne Ranney, and Bob Buecher


Miocene-Pliocene basalt flows on the east and west flanks of Wilson Ridge, Arizona, preserve multiple stages in the depositional history of adjacent Detrital Wash and Black Canyon basins, and may help constrain timing of incision by the Colorado River

Tracey J. Felger1, Robert J. Fleck2, and L. Sue Beard1

1. U.S. Geological Survey, 2255 N. Gemini Dr., Flagstaff, AZ 86001 (tfelger@usgs.gov)
2. U.S. Geological Survey, 345 Middlefield Rd, MS-937, Menlo Park, CA 94025
(fleck@usgs.gov)

Significance of the Grand Mesa basalt field in western Colorado for defining the early history of the upper Colorado River

Rex Cole, Dept. of Physical and Environmental Sciences, Mesa State College, Grand Junction, CO

U.S. Geological Survey, 2225 Gemini Dr., Flagstaff, AZ 86001


Syntectonic Deposition and Paleohydrology of the Spring-Fed Hualapai Limestone and Implications for 6-5 Ma Integration of the Colorado River System through the Grand Canyon 

Jessica C. Lopez Pearce, Laura J. Crossey, Karl E. Karlstrom, George Gehrels, Mark Pecha, Sue Beard, Elmira Wan

Paul Umhoefer, Melissa Lamb, and Sue Beard


Oligocene tuff supports older Paleocene-Eocene age of Hualapai Plateau basal Tertiary section

Richard A. Young1, Ryan Crow2, and Lisa Peters3

1. SUNY Geneseo
2. University of New Mexico
3. New Mexico Institute of Technology

Unroofing and incision of the Grand Canyon region as constrained through low-temperature thermochronology

John P. Lee1,2, Daniel F. Stockli1, Shari Kelley3, Joel Pederson4

1. Geology Dept., The University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS
2. The U.S. Geological Survey, Denver, CO
3. Dept. of Earth and Environmental Science, New Mexico Tech, Socorro, NM
4. Dept. of Geology, Utah State University, Logan, UT
L. Sue Beard1 and James E. Faulds2

1. U.S. Geological Survey, Flagstaff, AZ
2. Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology, University of Nevada, Reno

Mio-Pliocene erosional exhumation of the central Colorado Plateau, eastern Utah: New insights from apatite (U-Th)/He thermochronometry

Markella Hoffman1, Daniel F. Stockli1, Shari A. Kelley2, Joel Pederson3, and John Lee1

1. Dept. of Geology, University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS 66045
2. Dept. of Earth and Environmental Science, New Mexico Tech, Socorro, NM 87801
3. Geology Department, Utah State University, Logan, UT 84322

Maps for the Workshop

J.Luke Blair1, Thomas C. Hanks1, Richard A.Young2

1. U.S. Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA
2. Dept. Geological Sciences, SUNY at Geneseo

Incision Rates of the Colorado River in Glen Canyon

Tom Hanks, Kristen Cook, Marie Davis, Sid Davis, Bob Finkel, Cris Garvin, Arjun
Heimsath, Ivo Lucchitta, Bob Webb, and Kelin Whipple

A summary and evaluation of thermochronologic constraints on the exhumation history of the Colorado Plateau- Rocky Mountain region.

Shari A. Kelley1, Karl E. Karlstrom2, Danny Stockli3, Ryan McKeon4, Markella Hoffman3, John Lee3, Joel Pederson5, Rebecca Garcia1, David Coblentz6

1. Dept. of Earth and Environmental Science, New Mexico Tech, Socorro, NM 87801
2. Dept of Earth and Planetary Sciences, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131
3. Dept. of Geology, University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS 66045
4. Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Lehigh University, Bethlehem, PA 18015
5. Geology Department, Utah State University, Logan, UT 84322
6. Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87544

Denudational Flexural Isostacy of the Colorado Plateau: Implications for incision rates and tectonic uplift

Gregory D. Lazear, Karl Karlstrom, Andres Aslan, Brandon Schmandt
 
CREST Working Group

Differential incision rates in the upper Colorado River system: implications for knickpoint transience

Andy Darling1, Karl Karlstrom1, Andres Aslan2, Darryl Granger3

1. University of New Mexico
2. Mesa State College
3. Purdue University

Geochemistry of springs, travertines and lacustrine carbonates of the Grand Canyon region over the past 12 million years: the importance of groundwater on the evolution of the Colorado River System

Crossey1, L.C., Karlstrom1, K.E., Lopez Pearce1, J., and Dorsey2, R.

1. University of New Mexico
2. University of Oregon 

Incision History of the Little Colorado River based on K-Ar dating of basalts and U-Series dating of Travertine in the Springerville Area

E.H Embid, L.J. Crossey, and K.E Karlstrom
 
University of New Mexico 

Evidence from the Colorado River system for surface uplift of the Colorado Rockies and western Colorado Plateau in the last 10 Ma driven by mantle flow and buoyancy

Karlstrom, K.1, Coblentz, D.2, Ouimet, W.3, Kirby, E.4, Van Wijk, J.5, Schmandt, B.6,
Crossey, L.1, Crow, R.1, Kelley, S.7, Aslan, A8, Darling, A.1, Dueker, K.9, Aster, R.7,
MacCarthy J.7, Lazear, G.9, and the CREST working group
 
1. UNM, ABQ, NM, 87131,
2. LANL, Los Alamos, NM,
3. Amherst College, MA 01002,
4. Penn State, State College, PA 16802,
5. Univ of Houston, 6. UO, Eugene, OR,
7. New Mexico Tech, Socorro, NM,
8. Mesa State, Grand Junction, CO
9. UWYO, Laramie, WY

Quaternary incision history of the Black Canyon of the Gunnison, Colorado 

 
Sandoval, M. M. Karlstrom, K.E., Darling, A., Aslan, A., Granger, D., Wan, E., and Noe, D., and Dickinson, R.


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