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Other Sessions and Resources

Below are some of the sessions at the 2010 Sloan-C conference. Where applicable, additional materials such as handouts, slides, and notes have been provided as links (and are also attached at the bottom of the page). Additional information and resouces from the conference can be found by searching #aln2010 in twitter, youtube, and Flickr. You can also find a listing with all the sessions and resources here (http://sloanconsortium.org/aln/byAll)

Increasing Collaborative Learning in an Online Oral Communication Class

The purpose of this presentation is to explore the use of YouTube in oral communication classes. The focus will be on the role of the student enrolled in an oral communication class and the role of the faculty member teaching the course. The specifics of how to use YouTube as a teaching technique to increase collaborative learning will be reviewed using an Effective Speaking class being taught at the College of Central Florida by Professor Connie J. Tice as an example. The goals of the presentation are to provide oral communication instructors will practical skills necessary to increase collaborative learning in their online oral communication courses. Course participants will be provided with student examples and specific instructions on how to set up a collaborative learning environment using YouTube.
The best educational experience is providing reality-based skills that relate to real business environments. Providing students opportunity to test their skills in a virtual team setting based on a real business scenario. They will engage in interactive exchanges online with executive leadership using interactive video conferencing technology focused.

Many online learning environments can be lonely places to learn, with little opportunity for meaningful interaction with other students. In light of ongoing concerns regarding student retention and completion rates in online learning programs, increased attention is being given by colleges and universities to student engagement and involvement in a true virtual learning community, as opposed to a simple course delivery platform. Capital Education will highlight its approach to social networking through its vibrant virtual campus, allowing students to communicate and collaborate in courses, as well as informally in the virtual student union and student groups. Consequently, students remain connected to the course, to the institution, and to each other, and reflect high levels of satisfaction with their online experience.    
Final Presentation: 

Starting a Summer Online Program: From the Unthinkable to the Indispensable

Savvy colleges and universities are discovering the benefits of summer online programs: extend and diversify the classroom environment, improve student retention, provide faculty development, and retain valuable tuition dollars. Learn how to implement a effective strategy for launching a successful summer online program from both the faculty and administrative perspectives.
Final Presentation: 

Closing the Loop: Personalized Assessment Data for Students

This session describes student assessment and feedback tools created by Jones International University (JIU).  Learners receive regular evaluations, cumulative reports, and comparative data about their performance.  With the data JIU monitors teaching effectiveness, program quality, and student progress.
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Abstract: 
In this presentation we will look at the changing use of technology versus the educational goal of inquiry-based learning.  With attendees, we will examine the characteristics of inquiry-based learning as it applies to virtual worlds, games, and simulations.
Final Presentation: 

Using Multimedia Narrative to Foster Affective Development in the OLE

Online education has been dominated by a postivistic paradigm for developing cognitive intelligence. This approach fails to recognize the diversity of intellectual competences; nor does it encourage students to question personal values that influence their own attitudes and behavior. Recent brain research suggests that affective development is not just another domain of intelligence, but the fundamental basis for all learning. According to Alexandrov and Sams (2005), learning occurs when the brain has no appropriate knowledge in memory to solve a problem or fulfill a need; therefore, the intensity of emotion increases with the amount of learning required. Although multimedia narrative has been used to foster affective learning in the traditional classroom, no guidance specific to the use of narrative to foster affective learning in the online class is provided in the current literature.
Final Presentation: 

Despite the rapid spread of online course offerings in higher education and other educational and training settings, rigorous research examining its effectiveness and the critical elements of effective online learning experiences is limited. A meta-analysis of the online learning literature from 1996 through July 2008 found 50 independent effects from studies that contrasted (a) an online to a face-to-face condition, (b) measured student learning outcomes, (c) used a rigorous research design, and (d) provided adequate information for calculating the magnitude of the difference between online and face-to-face learner outcomes. The meta-analysis found that, on average, students in online learning conditions performed modestly better than those receiving face-to-face instruction. The advantage over face-to-face classes was significantly large in those studies contrasting blends of online and face-to-face instruction with entirely face-to-face instruction. The available research does not support the conclusion that blended instruction is superior as a medium of instruction, however. In the studies included in the meta-analysis, blended conditions often included additional learning time and instructional elements not present in control conditions. Several authors have suggested that results from such meta-analyses should not be generalized to full courses, and especially not to courses for students who have struggled academically. Responding to these criticisms, this presentation will describe the design principles for online learning that can be derived from available research and areas where further research is needed.

An Online Discussion Forum Guideline: Win-Win-Win for Students, Instructors and the University

This presentation describes the need for an Online Discussion Forum (ODF) Guideline in a university online MBA program and the subsequent development of such an instrument. The Guideline addresses minimum requirements and best practices in various aspects of the ODF, including development, setting of expectations and management.
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So, You Expect Them to Read That? Creating Text That Begs to Be Read.

People don't read web pages. They scan them. How can we overcome this so that students actually read and remember the information they need? This presentation will demonstrate how to make the on-screen reading of your text more inviting and memorable to students.
The session describes and presents research on the faculty workgroup model of online faculty and course development. This practical model maximizes efficiency and emphasizes quality by combining technology- and pedagogy-focused faculty development, peer mentoring, expertise and resource sharing, and collaborative online course development and refinement.
Final Presentation: 
Mistrust and misunderstanding can arise in faculty communities concerning how institutions hire, integrate, and evaluate online instructors. A Penn State research study was conducted to help dispel myths surrounding these issues. This presentation will share our findings and begin a discussion of further efforts that need to be taken.
Final Presentation: 

Instructors often use voice tools for content presentation, but what about students? It's also important to hear from them. This presentation will cover free voice recording tools for student use, including Voki, Voice Thread, Jing, and Photostory. The session will focus on actual classroom examples and best practices.

Exploring a Model for Using Video Podcasts Effectively in Online Learning

The purpose of this presentation is to present a model for using video podcasts effectively in online learning. The model is based using clips in four critical areas including: administration, instruction, assessment, and building community. A clear description of each area is presented along with practical examples and supporting research.
Final Presentation: 

Training Adjunct Faculty to Teach Online: MarylandOnline's Pilot Inter-Institutional Approach

This presentation focuses on a multi-institutional pilot project to create a course to train adjunct faculty how to teach online. Four areas are discussed: logistics of establishing possible shared training for independently governed institutions; course development process/product; teaching the course; and how evaluation data informed recommendations for the project's future.
Final Presentation: 

Online teaching and learning provides both a challenge and an opportunity for students with disabilities. While the anytime and anyplace availability of online courses is a benefit to all learners, the challenges of reading and accessing Web-based material can be a barrier if the content is not designed with accessibility in mind. Most of our course management systems are Section 508 and American with Disabilities Act compliant, but the materials that course developers put into their courses may not be accessible. Designing accessible material from the beginning of the course development process is much easier than retrofitting course content after the course is finished. The goals of this session are (1) to build awareness of accessibility issues, (2) to introduce assistive technologies used to access Web pages, and (3) to provide faculty with basic practices to create online material. Both the University of Pittsburgh and Dallas Telecollege have examined faculty strategies to develop accessible online course content. Our interest in accessibility was further motivated by Quality Matters, which considers accessibility to be a critical standard for the Quality Matters online course certification. From our experience and a thorough review of the literature, institutions have a broad spectrum of policies and statements regarding accessibility. We will share several policy statements that we consider to be most appropriate and comprehensive (for example, http://www.wisc.edu/policy/wwwap.php). Practices recommended to faculty include (1) applying the styles feature in Microsoft Word documents, (2) using templates for Microsoft PowerPoint presentations, (3) adding alt tags to images, (4) designing data tables with row/column headers, (5) using appropriate fonts, colors and backgrounds, (6) creating transcripts or captions for audio and video files, and other basic considerations for entering course content into a course management system. We have worked with students who have disabilities and will share their specific challenges and stories to access Web content. We also have examples and resources to share with the audience. This session is designed for faculty and course developers with low to moderate technology skills.

Does cognitive load play a role in student satisfaction for online students? A relationship study on 1,401 university students showed a moderate, positive, and significant relationship exists. Analytics suggest a refined view of the student perspective that provides guidelines for instructors and designers.

Language, Gender and Emerging Technologies

Presentation will explore theory, pedagogy, and technology for language teaching and learning. Web 2.0 technologies are also closing gender gap globally. By creating new and dynamic learning theory for the Digital Age, connectivism recognizes learning supported by social activity. It is particularly attuned to 2.0 pedagogy and technology.

Preparing to Teach Online Creates New Possibilities for Face-to-Face Teaching

An action research study was conducted to explore transformative learning among higher education faculty as a result of participating in a blended program to prepare them to teach online. Learning to teach online has the potential to transform faculty's assumptions and beliefs about teaching, changing their face-to-face teaching practices.
Final Presentation: 
This session will examine teachers' use of Web 2.0 tools in education, assess their awareness and perceptions of the pedagogical benefits of Web 2.0 technologies in teaching and learning, and investigate their interests and willingness of adopting Web 2.0 tools to support and supplement classroom instruction.
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Donald Jordan,
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Donald Jordan,
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Donald Jordan,
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Donald Jordan,
Nov 29, 2010, 4:33 PM
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Donald Jordan,
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Donald Jordan,
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Donald Jordan,
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Donald Jordan,
Nov 29, 2010, 4:01 PM
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