Videos Related to Math Education


"Young Children Reinvent Arithmetic  -  Multidigit Division: Two Teachers Use Piaget's Theory"

Developed and Narrated by: Constance Kamii, Ph.D. 
University of Alabama at Birmingham

Produced by: Mel Knight, Ed.D.
University of Alabama at Birmingham

Teachers: Linda Joseph [2nd grade], and Sally Jones [3rd grade]
Hall-Kent Elementary School   -   Homewood, Alabama

Pub Date: 1990, 19-min.



Multidigit Division: Two Teachers Using Piaget’s Theory


Constance Kamii shows constructivist teaching in elementary classrooms. 
Linda Joseph and Sally Jones, two elementary school teachers, use an approach based on Piaget’s theory to encourage their students to reinvent arithmetic. 
This video show examples of how students can invent the logic of division.










"Young Children Reinvent Arithmetic  -  First Graders Dividing 62 by 5: A Teacher Uses Piaget's Theory"

Developed and Narrated by: Constance Kamii, Ph.D. 
University of Alabama at Birmingham

Produced by: Faye B. Clark
Samford University

Teacher: Leslie Baker Housman [1st grade]

Pub Date: Jan 2000, 25-min.


Young Children Reinvent Arithmetic-First Graders Dividing 62 by 5: A Teacher Uses Piaget's Theory



Constance Kamii and Faye Clark show constructivist teaching in a first-grade classroom. 
Leslie Baker Housman, using an approach based on Piaget’s theory, encourages her first-grade students to think critically about mathematics.









"Direct vs. Indirect Ways of Teaching Number Concepts at Ages 4-6"
by Constance Kamii, Ph.D.

University of Alabama at Birmingham
November 2013

Recorded in conjunction with:
Center for Teaching and Learning
University of Alabama at Birmingham



"Direct vs. Indirect Ways of Teaching Number Concepts at Ages 4-6" by Constance Kamii


This videotape shows that although number concepts cannot be taught directly, they can be taught indirectly by encouraging children to think.












Kamii, C. (1989). Double-column addition: A teacher uses Piaget's theory (videotape).  
New York: Teachers College Press. 

Double-Column Addition, Part 1



Double-Column Addition, Part 2



Double-Column Addition, Part 3



















Giving Change When Payment Is Made with a Dime:

The Difficulty of Tens and Ones


This videotape illustrates the difficulty of constructing tens solidly out of the ones that are in the child’s head. The second grader in the videotape refused to accept the dime that the “customer” offered for a 6-cent purchase. She had all the verbal knowledge necessary to accept the dime such as the fact that a dime was worth 10 cents, and that 10 cents was “too much” for a 6-cent purchase. She could give the correct change when 8 pennies were tendered for a 4-cent purchase. She could easily add a few cents to a dime but could not subtract 6 cents from a dime because, for this subtraction, it was necessary to break “one ten” down into “ten ones.” This difficulty is explained by Chandler and Kamii in an article entitled “Giving Change When Payment Is Made with a Dime: The Difficulty of Tens and Ones” in the Journal for Research in Mathematics Education, 40(2009), 97-118.


            In the videotape, giving change for a dime appears toward the end of the following sequence. It begins by showing that, as long as only pennies were involved, the child had no trouble giving change.


           Candy purchased                           Cost                                     Payment

1 small                                    2 cents                                   2 pennies

1 large                                    3 cents                                   4 pennies

2 small                                   4 cents                                    8 pennies

2 large                                    6 cents                                    1 dime

3 large                                    9 cents                                    1 dime and 2 pennies


















Piaget on Piaget


Piaget on Piaget, Part 1




Piaget on Piaget, Part 2




Piaget on Piaget, Part 3




Piaget on Piaget, Part 4