Lung Transplant Statistics

    lung transplant
  • Lung transplantation, or pulmonary transplantation is a surgical procedure in which a patient's diseased lungs are partially or totally replaced by lungs which come from a donor.
  • (TX or XP) - surgery to replace one or both diseased lungs with healthy ones from a human donor.   [transplant links]
    statistics
  • The practice or science of collecting and analyzing numerical data in large quantities, esp. for the purpose of inferring proportions in a whole from those in a representative sample
  • a branch of applied mathematics concerned with the collection and interpretation of quantitative data and the use of probability theory to estimate population parameters
  • (statistical) of or relating to statistics; "statistical population"
  • Denver Dalley is an accomplished singer-songwriter who got his start in Omaha, Nebraska.
lung transplant statistics lung transplant statistics - Taking Flight:
Taking Flight: Inspirational Stories of Lung Transplantation
Taking Flight: Inspirational Stories of Lung Transplantation


Lung Transplantation is still relatively new compared to other transplantation surgery. The first successful heart/lung transplant took place in 1981, with the first successful single lung transplant taking place in 1983. It was not until 1986 the first successful double lung transplant takes place. Even more recent is the living lobar transplant which the first successful one being in 1990. The survival rate continues to rise with the introduction of new surgery techniques, drug therapies and physical therapy.

Often those given the option to have a lung transplant, have no place to turn and learn about the success and accomplishments of those receiving a single lung, double lung, or heart/lung transplant. It can become overwhelming being in the process of lung transplant and not hearing how the majority of people do afterward. Well the majority are out living very full lives.

These lives include, school, play, marriage, adventure, sports, careers, travel, volunteering, retirement and enjoying life and breathing. Family life is enhanced and new exciting opportunities open many eyes. But where can you read about this new beginning, new life, new breath you are given? Well, until now, there was no place. So that has changed with this book.

Taking Flight is a collection of stories from around the world, from recipients of all ages, all lung illnesses and what these recipients are now doing in their lives. Taking Flight is an opportunity to see that organ donation does work and that lives return to normal after surgery. Taking Flight can inspire those who pre transplant to see what they may be able to accomplish one day. It will bring to light that this is a great option for someone with end stage lung illness and your dreams are possible. For someone who has had a lung transplant, it is an inspiration to see others doing many of things you are now accomplishing yourself. An affirmation of sorts.

The butterfly theme is a symbol to those who have had a lung transplant and experienced the life within them and around them opening up and taking off. Many of these stories tell of a life long lung condition that did not allow them to take off into life like so many others do. But now they can and they take every opportunity that is given to them to go out and experience life. It shows that the very young are able to run, play, go to school, and do the things they dreamed of. It allows young people to pursue their dreams of a career, or marriage and finally making that much desired pursuit of a goal, a reality. For those who are retired, it allows them to spend time with family, friends, travel and become active once again.

Taking Flight is a starting point for those who are, considering lung transplant, or have had a lung transplant. From here you will soar and surprise, grow and learn, experience and share, while you breathe and spread your wings and fly.

Harefield - the hospital. And some interesting facts.
Harefield - the hospital.  And some interesting facts.
An aerial high-definition shot of Harefield Hospital on a postally used postcard published by Aerofilms Ltd. London. The site on which the hospital stands was originally the private parkland of Harefield Park House. Soon after the beginning of the Great War, its Australian owner offered the estate as a convalescent centre for injured Australians and New Zealanders. A series of inter-connected wooden huts were built in the grounds, and during the course of the war the facility expanded into a hospital, ultimately treating around 50,000 injured servicemen and women. It was known as the No. 1 Australian Auxilliary Hospital. Every year St. Mary's Church in Harefield village holds an ANZAC day service in remembrance of the servicemen who died in the hospital during the Great War. Over a hundred soldiers of the First Australian Imperial Force are buried in the churchyard. After the Great War the land was sold to Middlesex County Council which had been looking for a suitable place for a sanatorium to treat TB - a dangerous and prevalent illness at the time. Harefield was chosen because, as one of the highest points in Middlesex, 290 feet above sea level, the site had plenty of fresh air and sunlight. In the Second World War, Harefield dealt with war casualities. Sir Alexander Fleming spent some time there during the war studying the effects of penicillin on TB and other infections. After the war, Harefield became a general hospital, and, following on from its experience with TB, later developed expertise in cardio-thoracic surgery. Professor Sir Magdi Yacoub and his team did pioneering work in the late 60's on transferring human heart valves. In 1983 he carried out the world's first heart/lung transplant, and in 1984 he performed a heart transplant on a baby less than a month old. The hospital is set in glorious grounds of 47 acres (19 ha) which include tennis courts, a wood and a creek. The card was posted on the 1st. July 1970 to a recipient in Ravensdale Road, Hounslow. What the recipient read over 40 years ago was: "Dear Lily, Charles is over the operation and is keeping up best he can. They seem to be satisfied so far and I hope he will be out of intensive care soon. When he is I shall be back".
Retired NYPD Officer Cesar Borja dying from Ground Zero work
Retired NYPD Officer Cesar Borja dying from Ground Zero work
Cesar Borja, 52, a retired NYPD police officer, waits for a lung transplant in the intensive care unit at Mt. Sinai Hospital. He has pulmonary fibrosis from his work in the rubble at Ground Zero after 9/11 and will die unless a lung transplant can be found. His family keeps a vigil at his bedside.Wife Eva, son Ceasar 21, son Evan 16, and daughter Nhia 12.
lung transplant statistics
The Lung Transplantation Handbook (Second Edition): A Guide For Patients
This comprehensive, 270-page book, written by lung transplant recipient Karen A. Couture, covers the entire transplantation process from beginning to end for both lung and heart-lung transplants.



This book introduces the reader, in easy-to-understand language, to the complex process of getting on the transplant waiting list and how the list works; preparing for surgery and the surgery itself; financing the operation and the recovery afterward; and the complications of rejection and the medications. It also includes precautions a transplant recipient should take in order to live a long and healthy life; returning to work or school; future trends in transplantation; and writing to your donor family.



Scattered throughout this book are excerpts from the stories of pre-transplant patients, recipients and caregivers, to offer the unique perspective only a person going through the process could furnish.



This edition also provides a wealth of information in an extensive, up-to-date resource section; glossary; appendix of all lung transplant centers, including waiting time and the number of transplants performed; bibliography; and worksheets. This publication is a must-read for transplant candidates, recipients, family members, as well as social workers, and nurse transplant coordinators.

This comprehensive, 270-page book, written by lung transplant recipient Karen A. Couture, covers the entire transplantation process from beginning to end for both lung and heart-lung transplants.



This book introduces the reader, in easy-to-understand language, to the complex process of getting on the transplant waiting list and how the list works; preparing for surgery and the surgery itself; financing the operation and the recovery afterward; and the complications of rejection and the medications. It also includes precautions a transplant recipient should take in order to live a long and healthy life; returning to work or school; future trends in transplantation; and writing to your donor family.



Scattered throughout this book are excerpts from the stories of pre-transplant patients, recipients and caregivers, to offer the unique perspective only a person going through the process could furnish.



This edition also provides a wealth of information in an extensive, up-to-date resource section; glossary; appendix of all lung transplant centers, including waiting time and the number of transplants performed; bibliography; and worksheets. This publication is a must-read for transplant candidates, recipients, family members, as well as social workers, and nurse transplant coordinators.

Comments