Grammar


A Supplementary Guide to Professor Simpson's College English Class (COMM1007)

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Introduction
Course Outline
The Story of English
Grammar 
Etymology 
Essay Writing
ESL

Comic Strip Lessons

Yes, comic strips. This is a PDF book with comic strips I've created to help explain nouns and verbs and such. It includes your first assignment.

The Grammarwocky

PowerPoint Lessons

Nouns and Verbs 
Phrases and Clauses
Punctuation
Grammar Essentials Self-Test 
GrammarTest.doc

Internet Resources

 Punctuation Made Simple
(Colon, semicolon, comma, dash, apostrophe)

The Blue Book of Grammar and Punctuation Rules 

Guide to Grammar and Writing 
The late Dr. Charles Darling's outstanding site.

 It's Grammar Time

This course does not dwell on grammar since it is assumed that students have already been thoroughly grounded in the subject after years of elementary and high school. In recognition of the inherent joke of such an assumption, however, I will deal with some of the broader grammatical elements. 

Essentially these consist of three sections:

  • Nouns and verbs
  • Phrases and clauses
  • Punctuation

Nouns and Verbs

Although every student believes he or she already knows what nouns and verbs are, experience shows that this belief is optimistic at best, and sadly mistaken at worst. During this part of the course we explore how to pick a noun or a verb out of a line up, how to change one into the other, and how to get them to agree with each other without fighting.

Phrases and Clauses

Although grammar books can list upwards of nine or more phrase types, the only one that really concerns us in this course is the prepositional phrase ─ which naturally means we must take a look at prepositions.

Clauses, fortunately, only come in two forms: independent and dependent. With a solid knowledge of nouns and verbs, both types of clauses can be identified and analysed.

Punctuation

Once students have a good grasp on clauses and phrases, the whole matter of punctuation becomes much easier to deal with.


Above illustration from Modern English Grammar (Hypertext book) by Daniel Kies of the College of DuPage.