LUXEMBOURG

Photos from schools



School in Limpertsberg
School in Leudelange
School Lycée Michel-Rodange
 

INSTITUT POUR ENFANTS AUTISTIQUES ET PSYCHOTIQUES

  Autisme?

GRAND-DUCHÉ DE LUXEMBOURG

 

MINISTERE DE L’EDUCATION NATIONALE ET DE LA FORMATION PROFESSIONNELLE

EDUCATION DIFFÉRENCIÉE

   

"Reality to an autistic person is a confusing, interacting mass of events, people, places, sounds and sights. There seems to be no clear boundaries, order or meaning to anything.

A large part of my life is spent trying to work out the pattern behind everything. Set routines, times, particular routes and rituals all help to get order into an unbearably chaotic life. Trying to keep everything the same reduces some of the terrible fear."

 (Theresa Jolliffe, 1992)

  

The "Institut pour enfants autistiques et psychotiques"

 

The "Société luxembourgeoise pour l'aide aux personnes autistiques" is an  association without any financial interests, which was founded by a group of teachers, friends as well as parents of an autistic child in September 1981.

After the ambulant treatment of six children at their own home over a short period of time two groups of pupils gradually emerged from 1982 to 1984.  The classrooms in the school building in Cessange were made available by the city council of Luxembourg City.

In September 1984, one teacher was hired to take care of two teenagers in order to prepare them for the working world. One group of students was able to benefit from several training workshops at a facility in Berg in 1985. This service moved to Leudelange in 1989.

 In 1988 the Luxembourgish Government took the entire project under its wings, making it operate under the authority of the Ministry of Education. The aim of the project is to ensure the education of autistic children via speech therapy an by improving their psychomotor skills so as to allow them to integrate into society, school and the working environment.

The children can be reported to the CIS (Commission d’inclusion scolaire) by a teacher, an educator or by the parents.

After the approval of the parents, a two-week observation phase begins in one of the institute's classes.

A thorough diagnosis of the child's needs is established. This diagnosis covers the cognitive, physical, psychological, pedagogical and social domain of the child in question.

If the CIS believe a school enrolment in one of their classes is necessary and the parents give their approval, the file of the child in question is forwarded to the "Commission médico-psycho-pédagogique nationale" for approbation.

The institute currently holds 9 classes of students. A library with specific literature on autism and other handicaps can be consulted by teachers, parents and all other people who are interested in acquiring further information on these topics.

 

The assistance of autistic children and teenagers at the Institut pour enfants autistiques et psychotiques.

 

Aims of our assistance:

·       setting up an individual learning plan for each child

·       prepare the child for the school or/and working environment

·       enable the child to integrate into the everyday life of our society

·       develop the child's autonomy

 

The following skills are pivotal for teachers working at our institute:

·       thorough knowledge of the child's specific problem (diagnosis)

·       the ability to adapt the child's environment to its individual needs

·       educated observation skills to understand the child's behaviour

·       the capability to use effective methods of intervention

 

Work methods used at our institute:

·       1 on 1 workshops

·       workshops in small groups

·       part-time integration into regular school classes

·       development of basic communication skills (via pictograms, pictures, etc.)

·       usage of visual teaching aids to cope with the outside world (schedule, routines, etc.)

·       establish work ethics (time management, group dynamics, etc.)

·       training of social competencies (expressing feelings, organising free time activities, etc.)

·       sensory integration technique

 

The global target is to enable the child to implement the acquired skills in various domains of everyday life.
 
a) Personal notebook

In Nanette’s class we discovered that all the pupils were in possession of a special notebook. When the pupils go home for the weekend, they are supposed to take these notebooks with them to document their experiences. When the weekend is over, the data in the notebook is used as a support to discuss what they did at home. We noticed that the pupils used different means of documentation. Some of them wrote complete texts, while others only jotted down words. There were also students who used pictures or pictograms to express themselves. We use a similar method at our school. The only difference is that the parents are the ones who document their children’s activities. On Mondays we ask the students to choose those pictograms from a collection of pictures that correspond with what they were doing and feeling over the weekend. We liked Nanette’s idea since it establishes a connection between home and school: the pupils do something at home, bring it to school and it is helpful as a visual support. As a result, we decided to adapt our system. On Fridays we hand out 2 separate sheets to our students, one for Saturday and one for Sunday. On each sheet there are 4 questions:
Where were you?
Who was with you?
What did you do?
How did you feel?

Moreover, they receive one sheet with pictures and pictograms.

The students are supposed to answer the questions at home and at school we use the data to talk about their experiences. Pupils like this new system and the parents prefer it because they are no longer required to write down their ideas anymore.



b) Communication with go-talkers

In some classrooms we saw that several of the children communicate with go-talkers. We think that this is an efficient method for those students who have problems with articulation or who do not speak for various reasons. As we have a lot of pupils with those kinds of problems, we believe this could be a good idea to put into practice in some of our classrooms. One of our colleagues is already using this method as a daily “closing-activity” and for other social activities.

We recently introduced go-talk 4+ in physical education in one of our classes. The pupils are supposed to choose the activity they would like to do by pushing the correspondent buttons (playing with a big ball, jumping on the trampoline, playing basketball or running). We noticed that most of the pupils seemed to understand this system and chose the activity they really preferred.

We also introduced the go-talk 9+ in one of our classrooms. The pupils can use the device to express the following ideas:
name
I would like
something to eat
something to drink

Some students immediately understood this system because they were familiar with it. Others found it difficult to push 3 buttons in a row. However, this method and the candy they were given after the activity seemed to motivate them. So we would like to continue with this method and develop it.



c) Dealing with aggressive behaviour

In our classrooms we are confronted with aggressive behaviour on a daily basis.

In order to tackle this problem, we invited Johannes Heinrich (psychologist), a specialist in this domain. The first time he came, he observed three cases in three different classes in the morning. In the afternoon, we analysed the observations in a group discussion. The three teachers who deal with the three pupils in question on a daily basis were talking to Johannes Heinrich about the case, while the other teachers were listening. Everyone was allowed to intervene if they had questions or comments. The group seemed very interested and concerned, even those teachers who did not really know the pupils. The group discussion was alive and inspiring. By means of practical examples, Mr Heinrich showed us how to react in case of an aggression. The fact that he is someone from outside our school, allows him to analyse the situation more objectively and to give valuable advice. This helped us to see the problems from a different angle. During the second meeting we talked about the same three cases again and other, more general problems. The main topic was aggression:
how to react when confronted with aggression
what are the laws regarding this problem
how far are we allowed to go without getting in conflict with these laws
how can we get more support and attention from the authorities

It was an important exchange which inspired us to prepare a meeting with our principal in which we wanted to express our worries. We were all glad to have the support of Johannes Heinrich, whose experience and
objective analysis is extremely valuable. 

Experiences and changes through the comenius project

a) Personal notebook

In Nanette’s class we discovered that all the pupils were in possession of a special notebook. When the pupils go home for the weekend, they are supposed to take these notebooks with them to document their experiences. When the weekend is over, the data in the notebook is used as a support to discuss what they did at home. We noticed that the pupils used different means of documentation. Some of them wrote complete texts, while others only jotted down words. There were also students who used pictures or pictograms to express themselves. We use a similar method at our school. The only difference is that the parents are the ones who document their children’s activities. On Mondays we ask the students to choose those pictograms from a collection of pictures that correspond with what they were doing and feeling over the weekend. We liked Nanette’s idea since it establishes a connection between home and school: the pupils do something at home, bring it to school and it is helpful as a visual support. As a result, we decided to adapt our system. On Fridays we hand out 2 separate sheets to our students, one for Saturday and one for Sunday. On each sheet there are 4 questions:
Where were you?
Who was with you?
What did you do?
How did you feel?

Moreover, they receive one sheet with pictures and pictograms.

The students are supposed to answer the questions at home and at school we use the data to talk about their experiences. Pupils like this new system and the parents prefer it because they are no longer required to write down their ideas anymore.



b) Communication with go-talkers

In some classrooms we saw that several of the children communicate with go-talkers. We think that this is an efficient method for those students who have problems with articulation or who do not speak for various reasons. As we have a lot of pupils with those kinds of problems, we believe this could be a good idea to put into practice in some of our classrooms. One of our colleagues is already using this method as a daily “closing-activity” and for other social activities.

We recently introduced go-talk 4+ in physical education in one of our classes. The pupils are supposed to choose the activity they would like to do by pushing the correspondent buttons (playing with a big ball, jumping on the trampoline, playing basketball or running). We noticed that most of the pupils seemed to understand this system and chose the activity they really preferred.

We also introduced the go-talk 9+ in one of our classrooms. The pupils can use the device to express the following ideas:
name
I would like
something to eat
something to drink

Some students immediately understood this system because they were familiar with it. Others found it difficult to push 3 buttons in a row. However, this method and the candy they were given after the activity seemed to motivate them. So we would like to continue with this method and develop it.



c) Dealing with aggressive behaviour

In our classrooms we are confronted with aggressive behaviour on a daily basis.

In order to tackle this problem, we invited Johannes Heinrich (psychologist), a specialist in this domain. The first time he came, he observed three cases in three different classes in the morning. In the afternoon, we analysed the observations in a group discussion. The three teachers who deal with the three pupils in question on a daily basis were talking to Johannes Heinrich about the case, while the other teachers were listening. Everyone was allowed to intervene if they had questions or comments. The group seemed very interested and concerned, even those teachers who did not really know the pupils. The group discussion was alive and inspiring. By means of practical examples, Mr Heinrich showed us how to react in case of an aggression. The fact that he is someone from outside our school, allows him to analyse the situation more objectively and to give valuable advice. This helped us to see the problems from a different angle. During the second meeting we talked about the same three cases again and other, more general problems. The main topic was aggression:
how to react when confronted with aggression
what are the laws regarding this problem
how far are we allowed to go without getting in conflict with these laws
how can we get more support and attention from the authorities

It was an important exchange which inspired us to prepare a meeting with our principal in which we wanted to express our worries. We were all glad to have the support of Johannes Heinrich, whose experience and objective analysis is extremely valuable.


Useful addresses:

·       Institut pour Enfants autistiques et psychotiques

 Ø Direction, administration, service psycho-social

15, rue de Cessange, L-3347 Leudelange

Tél. : 37 85 24 / Fax : 37 14 96 / E-mail : ieap@ediff.lu

 

Ø Classes scolaires « Limpertsberg »

48, rue Henri VII, L-1725 Luxembourg

Tél : 691-262 248 (1) ; 621-687 086 (2) ;

        621-612 192 (3+4) ; 621-636 305 (5)       

 

Ø Classe scolaire « Warken »

Centre d’Education différenciée Warken

77-79, rue de Welscheid, L-9090 Warken

Tél : 81 75 51-233 / 621-675 060

 

Ø Classes scolaires « Lycée Michel Rodange »

30, boulevard Pierre Dupong

L-1430 Luxembourg

Tél : 26 04 – 72 03 / 621-763 830

 

Ø Classe scolaire « Leudelange »

15, rue de Cessange, L-3347 Leudelange

Tél : 37 85 24 / Fax : 37 14 96

 

·       Autisme Luxembourg a.s.b.l.

1, rue Jos Seyler, L-8521 Beckerich

Tél: 26 62 33 / Fax: 26 62 33 – 33

 

Ø Centre d’intégration et de récréation

pour personnes atteintes d’autisme

33, rue Antoine Meyer, L-2153 Luxembourg

Tél : 25 02 20 / 45 80 09 / Fax : 45 05 55

 

Ø Keramikfabrik

116, rue de Luxembourg, L-4221 Esch/Alzette

Tél :26 55 03 92 / Fax : 26 55 23 92

 

Ø Centre Roger Thelen

1, rue Jos Seyler, L-8521 Beckerich

Tél : 26 62 33 / Fax : 26 62 33 – 33

 

·       Fondation Autisme Luxembourg

31, Duerefstrooss, L-9766 Munshausen

Tél : 26 91 11 - 1 / Fax : 26 82 20 47

  

·       Association des parents de personnes atteintes d’autisme de Luxembourg a.s.b.l.

16, Grand-rue, L-9905 Troisvierges

Tél : 26 48 20 49

 

·       Amicale de l’Institut pour enfants autistiques et psychotiques a.s.b.l.

15, rue de Cessange, L-3347 Leudelange

Tél : 37 85 24 / Fax : 37 14 96