Columbus Oh White Pages

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  • Columbus is the capital and largest city in the U.S. state of Ohio, the state's third largest metropolitan area behind Cincinnati and Cleveland, and the fourth largest city in the American Midwest.
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  • The part of the telephone book that lists residential and business telephone numbers in alphabetical order by name, usually without any advertising copy
  • a telephone directory or section of a directory (usually printed on white paper) where the names of people are listed alphabetically along with their telephone numbers
  • A telephone directory (also called a telephone book and phone book) is a listing of telephone subscribers in a geographical area or subscribers to services provided by the organization that publishes the directory.
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columbus oh white pages - Waiting for
Waiting for Columbus (Bonus CD) (Dlx)
Waiting for Columbus (Bonus CD) (Dlx)
Little Feat's classic 1978 live double album, reissued complete on 2 CDs with 10 bonus tracks, seven unissued (mostly unheard mixes)! That unreleased material joins such classic fare as Oh Atlanta; Dixie Chicken; Willin' , and Tripe Face Boogie one of the better live albums ever waxed.

This 1978 live album remains a serious contender for one of the best live rock albums ever etched, standing toe to toe with live classics from the Band, Allman Brothers, and the Who. Recorded during concerts in London and Washington, D.C., Waiting for Columbus vividly captures the L.A. sextet at a crossroads between its swampy mid-'70s fusion of blues, country, and New Orleans R&B, and the more eclectic jazz accents introduced later in the decade. If the late Lowell George's influence had diminished in the studio, his presence dominates here in rowdy, righteous vocals, the mercurial tang of his indelible slide guitar, and a set-list laced with his songs. While still riveting in its initial, abridged CD release, this remastered two-disc edition expands and resequences the songs into a full concert set, with encore. Two deleted tracks are further augmented by 10 additional performances to make this a definitive edition of a classic album that really will "boogie your speakers away." --Sam Sutherland

264. tried to batter down the door
264. tried to batter down the door
MRD.vid1.264 They marched out of the swamp with their arms and opened fire upon the whites who were unarmed. In the meantime I, Mr. William E. Simmons, and several aides to white men had taken refuge in a brick house adjoining the church. The Negro militia charged out of the swamp surrounded the brick house and tried to batter down the door. THESE BEGINNING-T0-END, SEQUENCED IMAGES ARE FROM THE LINKED TO VIDEO FOLLOWING THIS SCRIPT. THE SCRIPT'S TEXT IS COMPLETE AND IS BROKEN DOWN TO MATCH TO THE IMAGE SHOWN WITH IT DURING THE VIDEO. - JS "Act in the Living Present - The Life of Martin Robison Delany" - by Jim Surkamp MRD.vid1.1 MD: “I leave you here and journey on and if I never more return, farewell” NARRATOR: Martin Delany finally gave up on America. MRD.vid1.2 His expulsion with two others from Harvard Medical School just because of skin color convinced him that the power of reason and merit alone did not in fact determine the country’s esteemed leaders. So, scraping just a few hundred dollars, MRD.vid1.3 he rented a crew and ship back to Africa, where his grandfather Shango had returned several generations before. MRD.vid1.4 SHIP MRD.vid1.5 His critics including Frederick Douglass, were legion. "You must stay here and fight for freedom," they told him. MRD.vid1.6 He certainly reflected on his already long life: MRD.vid1.7 the long road as one of five children in a freed family in Charles Town Virginia; MRD.vid1.8 and after that fleeing because they illegally learned how to read, followed by the many years as a physician’s assistant in Pittsburgh, MRD.vid1.9 and then editing two influential newspapers. MRD.vid1.10 Most of all he remembered as he perhaps gazed at the sperm whales that wandered into those southern latitudes . . . Of the day he was walking MRD.vid1.11 the road to Pittsburgh in 1829 deciding - his head filled with books and images of pharoahs and Africa - of making this pilgrimage in reverse back to Africa. MRD.vid1.12 “Land Ho!" MRD.vid1.13 NARRATOR: “The arrival of Martin Robison Delany in Liberia is an era in the history of African emigration, an event doubtless that will long be remembered by hundreds of thousands of Africa’s exiled children. MRD.vid1.14 Persons from all parts of the country came to Monrovia to see this great man.” People cheering: MRD.vid1.15 MRD.vid1.16 MRD.vid1.17 MRD.vid1.18 MRD.vid1.19 Ridiculed and ignored in America for speaking - MRD.vid1.20 embraced by the thousands here for speaking - how strange. MRD.vid1.21 MD: “The regeneration of the African race can only be effected by its own efforts, the efforts of its own self and whatever aid may come from other sources; and it must, in this venture succeed, as God leads the movement and His hand guides the way.” MRD.vid1.22 “Face thine accusers, scorn the rack and rod and, if thou hast truth to utter, MRD.vid1.23 speak and leave the rest to God." MRD.vid1.24 But we pushed on to Abeokuta. MRD.vid1.25 Africa taught Martin Delany its mysteries. MD: “The principle markets to see all the wonders MRD.vid1.26 is in the evening. As the shades of evening deepen, MRD.vid1.27 every woman lights her little lamp and, to the distant MRD.vid1.28 observer, presents the beautiful appearance of innumerable stars.” MRD.vid1.29 “But in the entire Aku country one is struck by the beautiful country which continually spreads out in every direction.” MRD.vid1.30 Africa also taught him its nightmares. . . I read August 13th in the West African Herald: MRD.vid1.31 “King Dahomey is about to make the great Custom in honor of the late King Gezo. MRD.vid1.32 Determined to surpass all former monarchs, a great pit has been dug which is to MRD.vid1.33 contain human blood enough to float a canoe. Two thousand persons will be sacrificed on this occasion. MRD.vid1.34 The king has sent his army to make some excursions at the expense of some weaker tribes. The younger people will be sold into slavery. The older persons will be killed At the Grand Custom.” MRD.vid1.35 MD: “Whole villages are taken.” “Farewell, farewell my loving friends, farewell. . .” MRD.vid1.36 The jasmine smells of Africa are tonight less fragrant than my scented memory of soft honey-suckled summer’s night breezes in Virginia long ago, and awaking to the mockingbird. {MRD.5:37} END PART 1 TO BLACK MRD.vid1.37 MRD.vid1.38 NARRATOR: On April 10th, 1860 at Lagos, Martin Delany and Robert Campbell MRD.vid1.39 boarded ship for London and Birmingham MRD.vid1.40 to seek backers for a plan to build freedman’s cotton farms in the Niger Valley. MRD.vid1.41 They would undersell, at the gold price of fourteen cents a pound, all the slave wrought cotton from the plantations back home. MRD.vid1.42 To make bales of cotton rot on the docks of Charleston and New Orleans as it were. MRD.vid1.43 MD: When I was growing up in Pittsburgh, my children’s age – I worked hours and hours ins
119. Wagon, Freedmen
119. Wagon, Freedmen
MRD.vid1.119 wagon freed blacks THESE BEGINNING-T0-END, SEQUENCED IMAGES ARE FROM THE LINKED TO VIDEO FOLLOWING THIS SCRIPT. THE SCRIPT'S TEXT IS COMPLETE AND IS BROKEN DOWN TO MATCH TO THE IMAGE SHOWN WITH IT DURING THE VIDEO. - JS "Act in the Living Present - The Life of Martin Robison Delany" - by Jim Surkamp MRD.vid1.1 MD: “I leave you here and journey on and if I never more return, farewell” NARRATOR: Martin Delany finally gave up on America. MRD.vid1.2 His expulsion with two others from Harvard Medical School just because of skin color convinced him that the power of reason and merit alone did not in fact determine the country’s esteemed leaders. So, scraping just a few hundred dollars, MRD.vid1.3 he rented a crew and ship back to Africa, where his grandfather Shango had returned several generations before. MRD.vid1.4 SHIP MRD.vid1.5 His critics including Frederick Douglass, were legion. "You must stay here and fight for freedom," they told him. MRD.vid1.6 He certainly reflected on his already long life: MRD.vid1.7 the long road as one of five children in a freed family in Charles Town Virginia; MRD.vid1.8 and after that fleeing because they illegally learned how to read, followed by the many years as a physician’s assistant in Pittsburgh, MRD.vid1.9 and then editing two influential newspapers. MRD.vid1.10 Most of all he remembered as he perhaps gazed at the sperm whales that wandered into those southern latitudes . . . Of the day he was walking MRD.vid1.11 the road to Pittsburgh in 1829 deciding - his head filled with books and images of pharoahs and Africa - of making this pilgrimage in reverse back to Africa. MRD.vid1.12 “Land Ho!" MRD.vid1.13 NARRATOR: “The arrival of Martin Robison Delany in Liberia is an era in the history of African emigration, an event doubtless that will long be remembered by hundreds of thousands of Africa’s exiled children. MRD.vid1.14 Persons from all parts of the country came to Monrovia to see this great man.” People cheering: MRD.vid1.15 MRD.vid1.16 MRD.vid1.17 MRD.vid1.18 MRD.vid1.19 Ridiculed and ignored in America for speaking - MRD.vid1.20 embraced by the thousands here for speaking - how strange. MRD.vid1.21 MD: “The regeneration of the African race can only be effected by its own efforts, the efforts of its own self and whatever aid may come from other sources; and it must, in this venture succeed, as God leads the movement and His hand guides the way.” MRD.vid1.22 “Face thine accusers, scorn the rack and rod and, if thou hast truth to utter, MRD.vid1.23 speak and leave the rest to God." MRD.vid1.24 But we pushed on to Abeokuta. MRD.vid1.25 Africa taught Martin Delany its mysteries. MD: “The principle markets to see all the wonders MRD.vid1.26 is in the evening. As the shades of evening deepen, MRD.vid1.27 every woman lights her little lamp and, to the distant MRD.vid1.28 observer, presents the beautiful appearance of innumerable stars.” MRD.vid1.29 “But in the entire Aku country one is struck by the beautiful country which continually spreads out in every direction.” MRD.vid1.30 Africa also taught him its nightmares. . . I read August 13th in the West African Herald: MRD.vid1.31 “King Dahomey is about to make the great Custom in honor of the late King Gezo. MRD.vid1.32 Determined to surpass all former monarchs, a great pit has been dug which is to MRD.vid1.33 contain human blood enough to float a canoe. Two thousand persons will be sacrificed on this occasion. MRD.vid1.34 The king has sent his army to make some excursions at the expense of some weaker tribes. The younger people will be sold into slavery. The older persons will be killed At the Grand Custom.” MRD.vid1.35 MD: “Whole villages are taken.” “Farewell, farewell my loving friends, farewell. . .” MRD.vid1.36 The jasmine smells of Africa are tonight less fragrant than my scented memory of soft honey-suckled summer’s night breezes in Virginia long ago, and awaking to the mockingbird. {MRD.5:37} END PART 1 TO BLACK MRD.vid1.37 MRD.vid1.38 NARRATOR: On April 10th, 1860 at Lagos, Martin Delany and Robert Campbell MRD.vid1.39 boarded ship for London and Birmingham MRD.vid1.40 to seek backers for a plan to build freedman’s cotton farms in the Niger Valley. MRD.vid1.41 They would undersell, at the gold price of fourteen cents a pound, all the slave wrought cotton from the plantations back home. MRD.vid1.42 To make bales of cotton rot on the docks of Charleston and New Orleans as it were. MRD.vid1.43 MD: When I was growing up in Pittsburgh, my children’s age – I worked hours and hours inscribing with a fine needle the Lord Prayer – MRD.vid1.44 all of it – on the face of an English six pence like this one. MRD.vid1.45 SHIP MRD.vid1.46 NARRATOR: Delany was not wanted in America because MRD.vid1.47 of his radical political views. So he set sail for London and began preparing his report to his ba
columbus oh white pages
columbus oh white pages
Historic Columbus Taverns: The Capital City's Most Storied Saloons
Taverns came early to Columbus, refreshing settlers and travelers as far back as the 1790s. Tom Betti and Doreen Uhas Sauer, from Columbus Landmarks Foundation, go barhopping through some of the historic public houses from the frontier era through Prohibition. Along the way, the stories of historic taverns in Columbus include Native American captivity stories, live bears, German "vinegar" brewers, Catholic Masses set against the backdrop of a tavern, cholera, typhoid, land speculation and political dealings, underground tunnels, a scandalous divorce and even a bordello (imagine that). Columbus has a lot of tavern history. Drink it in.