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Sept 7th meeting notes and photos

posted Oct 21, 2011, 1:09 PM by Stephanie Chasteen
Here are a few notes from our first meeting.
You can see all our great photos here:  https://picasaweb.google.com/105215877519705854466/PLCMeetingBrianJonesSept7th

A glowing teacher through the infrared meter
Brian Jones shared a great set of hands-on activities for teaching  climate change, including a glass-slide model of the atmosphere and
some super-fun infrared viewers (which he offers to lend to a teacher needing a set) through which we could see how heat is trapped in the layers of glass.  We went outside and looked at a biker (who seemed cold) and clouds and exhaust from the Little Shop van. 


You can see some of their activities here:  http://littleshop.physics.colostate.edu/forteachers.html
And check out their podcasts, many of which focus on climate change activities:  http://littleshopofphysics.wordpress.com/

Then we came inside and talked about the essence of the PLC: A group to share resources and teaching expertise
One meeting every month (around 5pm seemed a good time for most) Every 3rd meeting will be in-person, so the December meeting will be in-person (NCAR in Boulder was suggested as a good location)

Anyone can be in the PLC, but to get a stipend you have to go to 6 meetings/year or participate via the web at a regular level.  Several teachers said that what they’re interested in learning about is more hands-on activities and resources.  We also discussed the resistance that people meet from parents and students when it comes to  
issues of climate change.  One teacher said that he doesn’t have much resistance to teaching the content because he comes at it from the perspective of a real-life application of physics.  Another educator  
suggested that discussing climate change from a real-life perspective (e.g., the hands-on explorations shared by Brian Jones), and an optimistic perspective (e.g., there is something you can do) could be a positive approach.

David Swartz then gave a fascinating slideshow from his research experience studying soil in Alaska this summer.


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