PICTURES OF FRENCH COUNTRY DECORATING. FRENCH COUNTRY DECORATING

Pictures of french country decorating. Paris apartment decor. Workout room decorating ideas.

Pictures Of French Country Decorating


pictures of french country decorating
    french country
  • Large, solid, simple furniture and a primary color scheme of reds, blues, and bright yellows.  Sometimes called French Provincial.
    decorating
  • Confer an award or medal on (a member of the armed forces)
  • (decorate) make more attractive by adding ornament, colour, etc.; "Decorate the room for the party"; "beautify yourself for the special day"
  • (decorate) deck: be beautiful to look at; "Flowers adorned the tables everywhere"
  • Make (something) look more attractive by adding ornament to it
  • Provide (a room or building) with a color scheme, paint, wallpaper, etc
  • (decorate) award a mark of honor, such as a medal, to; "He was decorated for his services in the military"
    pictures
  • Represent (someone or something) in a photograph or picture
  • (picture) a visual representation (of an object or scene or person or abstraction) produced on a surface; "they showed us the pictures of their wedding"; "a movie is a series of images projected so rapidly that the eye integrates them"
  • Describe (someone or something) in a certain way
  • Form a mental image of
  • (picture) visualize: imagine; conceive of; see in one's mind; "I can't see him on horseback!"; "I can see what will happen"; "I can see a risk in this strategy"
  • (pictural) pictorial: pertaining to or consisting of pictures; "pictorial perspective"; "pictorial records"
pictures of french country decorating - Charles Faudree's
Charles Faudree's Country French Living
Charles Faudree's Country French Living
One of America's top 100 designers, Charles Faudree has worldwide appeal with his interpretation of Country French. Charles Faudree's Country French Living features his newest room designs. From the entryway to the dressing room to walls, dining rooms, and outdoor spaces, Charles teaches principles of design that make a house a Country French home:
The importance of the bedroom and how to make it a soothing sanctuary, deserving as much attention to beauty and detail as the rest of the home.
How to identify a pivotal fabric, a dominant color, or one magnificent antique that will dictate the style and design for a whole room.
How books can create an inviting atmosphere and add a warmth all their own.
How a valance is the ultimate decorating deceit, and how window treatments express the personality of a room and add a proper finish.
How to use walls as they are meant--as a stage on which to display one's favorite collections.
How to use symmetrical groupings that provide a sense if balance and order in a room
Charles Faudree's Country French Living also shows how to make the most of accessories like lamps, pillows, baskets, paintings, and more to finish a room and provide the charm and character so important in a well-designed French Country setting. Country French Living reveals that the true test of a beautiful room is in the details.
Charles Faudree's clients are found throughout America as well as in Spain and Jamaica. Five individual homes designed by Charles, including his own, have been featured on HGTV. During his twenty-five-year career as an interior designer, his work has appeared in many design magazines and decorating books. Six of his own homes have been featured in Traditional Home magazine, where he was a Design Award Winner in 1995. He has also been featured in Better Homes & Gardens Special Interest Publications, Renovation Style, Veranda, Southern Accents, and House Beautiful. In 2002 he was named one of America's top 100 interior designers.

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CIRCULO MILITAR, San Martin Plaza, Buenos Aires, Argentina ()
CIRCULO MILITAR, San Martin Plaza, Buenos Aires, Argentina  ()
CIRCULO MILITAR The Circulo Militar is one of the most beautiful buildings in all of Buenos Aires, and it seems to have been plucked out of France's Loire Valley. It was built as the mansion of the Paz family, the owners of the newspaper La Prensa, whose original office was on Avenida de Mayo and is now the Casa de Cultura. The Paz family was one of the wealthiest and most powerful families in the whole country, and some will still call this building by its two old names -- Palacio Paz and Palacio Retiro. Now officially called the Circulo Militar, named for the society of retired military officers who bought the building in 1938. It was built in stages spanning from 1902 to 1914, under the direction of the French architect Louis H. M. Sortais. The commissioner of the project, family patriarch Jose Clemente Paz, died in 1912 and never saw its completion. Marble and other materials throughout the building were imported from all over Europe. Most rooms are reminiscent of Versailles, especially the bedrooms and the gold-and-white music hall with an ornate parquet floor and windows overlooking the plaza. Other rooms are in the Tudor style, and the Presidential Room, where men would retreat for political conversation, is the most unusual. Very masculine and dark, it is lit by strange chandeliers decorated with naked hermaphrodite characters with beards and breasts, whose faces contort as they are lanced through their private parts. It is unknown why this was the decorative theme of a room intended for politics. The six elevators are original to the building and the overall height of the building is eight stories, though with their high ceilings, there are only four levels to the building. The most impressive room is the round Hall of Honor, which sits under an interior rotunda and even has a balconied second level overlooking a stage. It was a private mini-opera house, covered in multicolored marble and gilded bronze, used now for conferences. Excerpt from Frommer's -------------- BASILICA de NUESTRA SENORA del PILAR This basilica beside the famous Cementerio de la Recoleta on Junin is where Buenos Aires's elite families hold weddings and other ceremonies. It was built by the Franciscan Recoleto friars in 1732 and is considered a national treasure for its six German baroque-style altars, the central one overlaid with Peruvian engraved silver, and relics sent by Spain's King Carlos III. In the church cloisters, which date from 1716, is the Museo de los Claustros del Pilar, a small museum of religious artifacts as well as pictures and photographs documenting the Recoleta area's evolution. More of the church's former cloisters and internal patios of the Franciscan monks have been converted into Centro Cultural La Recoleta Fodor's Review: ---------- BUENOS AIRES ARCHITECTURE Buenos Aires architecture is characterized by its eclectic nature, with elements resembling Barcelona, Paris and Madrid. Italian and French influences increased after the declaration of independence at the beginning of the 19th century, though the academic style persisted until the first decades of the 20th century. Attempts at renovation took place during the second half of the 19th century and the beginning of the 20th, when European influences penetrated into the country, reflected by several buildings of Buenos Aires such as the Iglesia Santa Felicitas by Ernesto Bunge; the Palace of Justice, the National Congress, and the Teatro Colon, all of them by Vittorio Meano. The simplicity of the Rioplatense baroque style can be clearly seen in Buenos Aires through the works of Italian architects such as Andre Blanqui and Antonio Masella, in the churches of San Ignacio, Nuestra Senora del Pilar, the Cathedral and the Cabildo. The architecture of the second half of the 20th century continued to reproduce French neoclassic models, such as the headquarters of the Banco de la Nacion Argentina built by Alejandro Bustillo, and the Museo Hispanoamericano de Buenos Aires of Martin Noel Since the 1930s, the influence of Le Corbusier and European rationalism consolidated in a group of young architects from the University of Tucuman, among whom Amancio Williams stands out. The construction of skyscrapers proliferated in Buenos Aires until the 1950s. Newer modern high-technology buildings by Argentine architects in the last years of the 20th century and the beginning of the 21st include the Le Parc Tower by Mario Alvarez, the Torre Fortabat by Sanchez Elia and the Repsol-YPF tower by Cesar Pelli. From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
CIRCULO MILITAR, San Martin Plaza, Buenos Aires, Argentina (II)
CIRCULO MILITAR, San Martin Plaza, Buenos Aires, Argentina  (II)
CIRCULO MILITAR The Circulo Militar is one of the most beautiful buildings in all of Buenos Aires, and it seems to have been plucked out of France's Loire Valley. It was built as the mansion of the Paz family, the owners of the newspaper La Prensa, whose original office was on Avenida de Mayo and is now the Casa de Cultura. The Paz family was one of the wealthiest and most powerful families in the whole country, and some will still call this building by its two old names -- Palacio Paz and Palacio Retiro. Now officially called the Circulo Militar, named for the society of retired military officers who bought the building in 1938. It was built in stages spanning from 1902 to 1914, under the direction of the French architect Louis H. M. Sortais. The commissioner of the project, family patriarch Jose Clemente Paz, died in 1912 and never saw its completion. Marble and other materials throughout the building were imported from all over Europe. Most rooms are reminiscent of Versailles, especially the bedrooms and the gold-and-white music hall with an ornate parquet floor and windows overlooking the plaza. Other rooms are in the Tudor style, and the Presidential Room, where men would retreat for political conversation, is the most unusual. Very masculine and dark, it is lit by strange chandeliers decorated with naked hermaphrodite characters with beards and breasts, whose faces contort as they are lanced through their private parts. It is unknown why this was the decorative theme of a room intended for politics. The six elevators are original to the building and the overall height of the building is eight stories, though with their high ceilings, there are only four levels to the building. The most impressive room is the round Hall of Honor, which sits under an interior rotunda and even has a balconied second level overlooking a stage. It was a private mini-opera house, covered in multicolored marble and gilded bronze, used now for conferences. Excerpt from Frommer's ------- BUENOS AIRES ARCHITECTURE Buenos Aires architecture is characterized by its eclectic nature, with elements resembling Barcelona, Paris and Madrid. Italian and French influences increased after the declaration of independence at the beginning of the 19th century, though the academic style persisted until the first decades of the 20th century. Attempts at renovation took place during the second half of the 19th century and the beginning of the 20th, when European influences penetrated into the country, reflected by several buildings of Buenos Aires such as the Iglesia Santa Felicitas by Ernesto Bunge; the Palace of Justice, the National Congress, and the Teatro Colon, all of them by Vittorio Meano. The simplicity of the Rioplatense baroque style can be clearly seen in Buenos Aires through the works of Italian architects such as Andre Blanqui and Antonio Masella, in the churches of San Ignacio, Nuestra Senora del Pilar, the Cathedral and the Cabildo. The architecture of the second half of the 20th century continued to reproduce French neoclassic models, such as the headquarters of the Banco de la Nacion Argentina built by Alejandro Bustillo, and the Museo Hispanoamericano de Buenos Aires of Martin Noel Since the 1930s, the influence of Le Corbusier and European rationalism consolidated in a group of young architects from the University of Tucuman, among whom Amancio Williams stands out. The construction of skyscrapers proliferated in Buenos Aires until the 1950s. Newer modern high-technology buildings by Argentine architects in the last years of the 20th century and the beginning of the 21st include the Le Parc Tower by Mario Alvarez, the Torre Fortabat by Sanchez Elia and the Repsol-YPF tower by Cesar Pelli. From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

pictures of french country decorating
pictures of french country decorating
Country French Florals & Interiors (Home Reference)
In this third book, Charles Faudree shares some of his most recent signature Country French interiors and introduces floral artist Toni Garner, his personal florist, to create what he deems the ultimate accessory for every room in a home-fresh flower arrangements. Offering a rich visual text of interior design ideas he shows that using flowers in creative combinations and unique containers will set your rooms apart from and above all others. From table toppers to show stoppers, these ebullient artists offer a cornucopia of fresh floral and interior design tips and suggestions.
Sections Include:
Viva la Difference
Flowers
Family Spaces
Private Moments
The Magic of One Flower
Charles Faudree's Country French Living and Charles Faudree's French Country Signature have sold over 110,000 copies. Toni Garner shares tips for using non-traditional containers and creating memorable bouquets. Faudree has been named one of House Beautiful's "Top Designers in America" and has been featured in numerous publications, including Veranda, House and Garden, and Traditional Home.His career has spanned over 35 years with clients throughout the United States, the Bahamas, and Europe.Arrangements are presented as non-static, and emphasize the life cycle of an arrangement from tight buds to mature bouquets dropping petals on the table.
Author Bio: International designer Charles Faudree's first book, Charles Faudree's French Country Signature, introduced in 2003, is still being printed. In 2005 his second book, Charles Faudree's French Country Living, sold over 60,000 copies in less than six months. While writing books, Charles maintains a retail shop in Tulsa, and has launched a fabric line, The Charles Faudree Collection, for Vervain. In 2002 he was named one of America's top 100 designers. He lives in Tulsa, Oklahoma.
Toni Garner opened her Tulsa flower shop 24 years ago and has collected awards for her innovative floral designs, and has appeared in publications including Veranda, Architectural Digest, and Traditional Home as well as all of Charles Faudree's books. She has been honored as Oklahoma Designer of the Year and has been named Oklahoma Magazine's "Best Florist" for 10 years running.

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