DECORATIVE FIREPLACE IDEAS. FIREPLACE IDEAS

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Decorative Fireplace Ideas


decorative fireplace ideas
    decorative
  • Serving to make something look more attractive; ornamental
  • (decorativeness) an appearance that serves to decorate and make something more attractive
  • Relating to decoration
  • cosmetic: serving an esthetic rather than a useful purpose; "cosmetic fenders on cars"; "the buildings were utilitarian rather than decorative"
  • (decoratively) in a decorative manner; "used decoratively at Christmas"
    fireplace
  • A structure surrounding such a place
  • A fireplace is an architectural structure to contain a fire for heating and, especially historically, for cooking. A fire is contained in a firebox or firepit; a chimney or other flue directs gas and particulate exhaust to escape.
  • A place for a domestic fire, esp. a grate or hearth at the base of a chimney
  • an open recess in a wall at the base of a chimney where a fire can be built; "the fireplace was so large you could walk inside it"; "he laid a fire in the hearth and lit it"; "the hearth was black with the charcoal of many fires"
  • (Fireplaces) A fireplace can offer warmth, ambience, and an inviting focal point in a home. Fire provides the perfect atmosphere for social interaction, and watching the dancing flames is a mesmerizing experience.
    ideas
  • (idea) the content of cognition; the main thing you are thinking about; "it was not a good idea"; "the thought never entered my mind"
  • (idea) a personal view; "he has an idea that we don't like him"
  • An opinion or belief
  • A thought or suggestion as to a possible course of action
  • A concept or mental impression
  • (idea) mind: your intention; what you intend to do; "he had in mind to see his old teacher"; "the idea of the game is to capture all the pieces"
decorative fireplace ideas - Asian Furniture
Asian Furniture & Decor - 54" Ming Design Chinese Lacquered Oriental Fireplace Screen ( Black )
Asian Furniture & Decor - 54" Ming Design Chinese Lacquered Oriental Fireplace Screen ( Black )
Beautiful, 32" tall fireplace screen, kiln dried tropical Rosewood, hand crafted with classic mortise and tenon joinery, finished with 12 coat hard lacquer finish, heirloom quality fine lacquer furniture, built to last . Choose the high luster gloss back, with fine, handpainted Ming era mountain temple landscape motif, or the stunning 24ct. gold leaf foil applique, with beautiful handpainted Ming era pine & crane motif. Perfect size and shape to hide the fireplace when not in use, or the unsightly wires and cables under the desk. Each one a unique work of art, great with traditional formal interiors, or more modern, contemporay eclectic design, ships in 48 hours, professionally packed, fully insured from our Massachusetts warehouse via FED EX, expedited delivery available.

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Sternberg Mansion; Wichita, KS
Sternberg Mansion; Wichita, KS
Best viewed LARGE size. This drawing of the William Henry Sternberg residence at 1065 North Waco Avenue appeared in the 1887 Wichita City Directory. The house is still standing today (09/2010) and looks much the same except for maintenance and upkeep on the structure and the south chimney is temporarily down due to structural instability. Sternberg Mansion is the only one of the "Fabulous 10" homes (see photostream for the Fabulous 10 flyer) to survive from Wichita's economic boom of the 1870s and 1880s. The house incorporates a variety of Sternberg design elements also seen on other Sternberg-designed Sternberg-built homes such multiple ornate chimney flues that corbel down through the second and/or first floors, diamond designs within the slate roof, a zig-zag "V"-shaped design at the very apex of the roof, one and only one half-moon window in the entire structure and located on the 3rd floor, an asymmetrical roofline broken with multiple dormers and pitches, a triangular porch roof over the main entry way with a square porch over that, second and third story windows held together with decorative designs which give the appearance of a two-story enclosure, multiple fuctional porches on the first and second levels and decorative porches (too small to be functional) appearing on the 3rd level, a fourth floor dormer with windows, uncovered stairs entering into the home, large heavy carved double front doors, a plethora of decorative gingerbread ornamentation, two-story bay windows separated with bands of fishscales between the first and second story and many other features common to Sternberg. William Henry Sternberg was a highly skilled and popular builder during Wichita’s boom years of the 1870s and 1880s. Mr. Sternberg came to Kansas from New York in 1875. He grew up on a family farm in Norwich, New York helping his father in the family saw mill, felling and hauling trees, cutting lumber, woodworking and working as a carpenter on local homes and buildings. As years passed and Sternberg continued working as a contractor and a carpenter, his skills in building grew and he became well-known throughout New York State for his elegant and innovative building designs, his integrity, work quality and prudent approach to costs. People far and wide knew of his reputation for quality and knew him as a fair man in dealing with customers. Partly as a result of his reputation for being a fair and honest man in addition to his first-rate work as a builder, he was elected Mayor of Norwich for a period of several years. Although comfortable with his life in New York, Mr. Sternberg increasingly heard about Wichita, Kansas ~ a rapidly growing nucleus on the plains. Indeed the growth bubble (from the late 1870’s until about 1890) was so significant that Wichita was by some estimates the fastest growing city in the country! At one point, the absolute value of real estate transactions in Wichita ranked it the third highest in the nation in terms of dollars transacted. This was behind only New York City (#1) and Kansas City (#2). People were speculating on land and buildings and making handsome profits in return. “In the first five months of 1887 real estate transactions totaled $34,893,565 according to Dunn and Bradstreet’s reports. Wichita was third in the nation in total real estate transactions. Only New York and Kansas City were ahead of Wichita (in terms of volume). Chicago was fourth having $33,173,950 in transactions.” However, in terms of the dollar value of real estate transactions per capita, Wichita was first in the country for a period of several years in the mid-late 1880s, because New York City and Kansas City had much larger populations to produce a similar amount of real estate transactions. The volume of real estate transactions going on in Wichita was a little surprising to say the least (shocking may be a better word) because in the 1870s,1880s and 1890s, New York City was the largest city (population-wise) in the country. Kansas City was around the 75th largest city of the top 100 cities in the U.S. and Wichita didn't even figure into the top 100 largest cities until the 1920 census! In terms of population numbers, New York boasted 1,206,299 in 1880. Kansas City came in at 55,785 in 1880 and Wichita came in 4,911 in 1880 but had more dollars of real estate being transacted per person than a city 10 times its size (KC) or even 250 times its size (NYC)! With its new found wealth, Wichita was progressive in its early days and news of its budding wealth traveled the country. Evidence of its progressive spirit was noted with much fanfare on May 23, 1873 when Wichita’s first regularly-scheduled electrified street cars (trolley cars) began shuttling people between the bustling downtown and the outskirts of the city. Three years later, Wichita installed several hundred nighttime electric street lamps throughout downtown, while still retaining some of its existing gas a
Finlay Ross Mansion; Wichita, KS
Finlay Ross Mansion; Wichita, KS
Photo, c. 1887 of the Finlay Ross home at 821 North Waco Avenue in Wichita, KS. This residence is confirmed to have been built by William Henry Sternberg (1832 - 1906). Sternberg was the leading designer and builder of fine homes such as this one in the Wichita area in the last quarter century of the 1800s. Finlay Ross was a prominent businessman in Wichita and later on became Mayor of Wichita during which time he established Riverside Park - ever popular today. While headquartered in Wichita KS, Sternberg did branch out and build fine homes and buildings throughout southern Kansas and Missouri. To wit, in the late 1800s, Sternberg built the original limestone City Hall in Springfield MO (now the Greene County Historical Museum), still standing today and on the National Register of Historic Places. Sternberg was a highly skilled and popular builder during Wichita’s boom years of the 1870s and 1880s. Mr. Sternberg came to Kansas from New York in 1875. He grew up on a family farm in Norwich, New York helping his father in the family saw mill, felling and hauling trees, cutting lumber, woodworking and working as a carpenter on local homes and buildings. As years passed and Sternberg continued working as a contractor and a carpenter, his skills in building grew and he became well-known throughout New York State for his elegant and innovative building designs, his integrity, work quality and prudent approach to costs. People far and wide knew of his reputation for quality and knew him as a fair man in his dealings with customers. Partly as a result of his reputation for being a fair and honest man, he was elected Mayor of Norwich for a period of several years. Although comfortable with his life in New York, Mr. Sternberg increasingly heard about Wichita, Kansas ~ a rapidly growing nucleus on the plains. Indeed the growth bubble (from the late 1870’s until about 1890) was so significant that Wichita was by some estimates the fastest growing city in the country. At one point, the absolute value of real estate transactions in Wichita ranked it the third highest in the nation in terms of dollars transacted. This was behind only New York City and Kansas City! People were speculating on land and buildings and making handsome profits in return. “In the first five months of 1887 real estate transactions totaled $34,893,565 according to Dunn and Bradstreet’s reports. Wichita was third in the nation in total real estate transactions. Only New York and Kansas City were ahead of Wichita (in terms of volume). Chicago was fourth having $33,173,950 in transactions.” However... in terms of the dollar value PER CAPITA (dollars per person), Wichita was first in the nation for a period of several years in the mid-late 1880s. New York and Kansas City had much larger populations than Wichita to produce a higher absolute volume of real estate transactions. But their dollar volumes per capita were in fact lower than Wichita, KS. With its new found wealth, Wichita was progressive in its early days and news of its budding wealth traveled the country. Evidence of its progressive spirit was noted with much fanfare on May 23, 1873 when Wichita’s first regularly-scheduled electrified street cars (trolley cars) began shuttling people between the bustling downtown and the outskirts of the city. Three years later, Wichita installed several hundred nighttime electric street lamps throughout downtown, while still retaining some of its existing gas and “vapor” lamps. And in the Spring of 1883, Wichita's new underground water system with 60 fire hydrants spread throughout the City was tested, on-line and ready-to-go. One of the things Wichita did with this wealth is invest in public systems and buildings to the tune of over ten million dollars per year in some years in the 1880s. This was W.H. Sternberg's hey-day. Impressive buildings were going up... literally as fast as they could possibly build. Between July 1, 1886 and June 30, 1887 almost 3,000 new completed structures were erected in Wichita and all of this with a population of only about 12,000. Spying an opportunity for building, Mr. Sternberg moved his family to Wichita in 1875 and after only a few months, was successfully bidding contracts, hiring workers and constructing buildings at a frenzied pace. The economic bubble of Wichita in the 1880s was perhaps the most dynamic growth spurt of any city in American history. Wealth sprung up practically overnight and people such as: C.N. Lewis, Albert. W. Oliver (Businessman), Aaron Katz (Merchant), Mark J. Oliver (Atty), Hiram Imboden (Businessman), M.W. Levy (Bank President), Peter Getto (Capitalist), Reuben H. Roys (Atty), Finlay Ross (Mayor & Businessman), William H. Whitman, Jacob Henry Aley (Businessman), Robert E. Gutherie, J.R. Van Zandt (prominent businessman), George Pratt (lumber baron), Charles W. Bitting (prominent Businessman), Alfred W. Bitting (Prominent Businessman), Judge James L. Dyer

decorative fireplace ideas
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