COLLEGE HOUSE DECORATING IDEAS : DECORATING IDEAS

COLLEGE HOUSE DECORATING IDEAS : MODERN OFFICE DECORATING.

College House Decorating Ideas


college house decorating ideas
    college house
  • College House is a Hall of Residence associated with the University of Canterbury. It is located in Ilam, Christchurch, New Zealand The hall provides accommodation for 152 undergraduate students. It is the oldest hall in New Zealand.
    decorating
  • Provide (a room or building) with a color scheme, paint, wallpaper, etc
  • Confer an award or medal on (a member of the armed forces)
  • (decorate) deck: be beautiful to look at; "Flowers adorned the tables everywhere"
  • Make (something) look more attractive by adding ornament to it
  • (decorate) make more attractive by adding ornament, colour, etc.; "Decorate the room for the party"; "beautify yourself for the special day"
  • (decorate) award a mark of honor, such as a medal, to; "He was decorated for his services in the military"
    ideas
  • A thought or suggestion as to a possible course of action
  • An opinion or belief
  • A concept or mental impression
  • (idea) the content of cognition; the main thing you are thinking about; "it was not a good idea"; "the thought never entered my mind"
  • (idea) mind: your intention; what you intend to do; "he had in mind to see his old teacher"; "the idea of the game is to capture all the pieces"
  • (idea) a personal view; "he has an idea that we don't like him"
college house decorating ideas - Wallmonkeys Peel
Wallmonkeys Peel and Stick Wall Graphic - Baker House, College Dormitory - 60"W x 40"H
Wallmonkeys Peel and Stick Wall Graphic - Baker House, College Dormitory - 60"W x 40"H
WallMonkeys wall graphics are printed on the highest quality re-positionable, self-adhesive fabric paper. Each order is printed in-house and on-demand. WallMonkeys uses premium materials & state-of-the-art production technologies. Our white fabric material is superior to vinyl decals. You can literally see and feel the difference. Our wall graphics apply in minutes and won't damage your paint or leave any mess. PLEASE double check the size of the image you are ordering prior to clicking the 'ADD TO CART' button. Our graphics are offered in a variety of sizes and prices.
WallMonkeys are intended for indoor use only.
Printed on-demand in the United States Your order will ship within 3 business days, often sooner. Some orders require the full 3 days to allow dark colors and inks to fully dry prior to shipping. Quality is worth waiting an extra day for!
Removable and will not leave a mark on your walls.
'Fotolia' trademark will be removed when printed.
Our catalog of over 10 million images is perfect for virtually any use: school projects, trade shows, teachers classrooms, colleges, nurseries, college dorms, event planners, and corporations of all size.

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Edwards-Barton House
Edwards-Barton House
Historic Richmondtown, Staten Island, New York City, New York, United States Landmarks Preservation Commission June 26, 2001; Designation List 328 LP-2093 This two-and-a-half story frame house with wood-clapboard siding is one of the most impressive mid-nineteenth-century houses in Richmondtown, the eighteenth- and nineteenth-century governmental center of Staten Island. Built in 1869 for Webley Edwards, a prosperous businessman and government official, the house is located at the intersection of Richmond Road and Court Place on one of the most prominent sites in the village. The house is a fine and well-preserved example of a popular mid-nineteenth-century rural house type which is well represented in many parts of the country but is now very unusual in New York City. A later example of this house type, the symmetrically-planned center-hall house with a side-gabled roof fronted by a prominent center cross gable, it is embellished with handsome Italianate and Second Empire detailing. Notable features include the heavy molded door and window surrounds, bracketed cornices and bay widows on the side elevations. Edwards became wealthy developing property in Port Richmond inherited by his wife Deborah Mersereau Edwards. He held various county offices in the 1850s and 1860s and was serving as county treasurer in 1869 when this house was erected. After Edwards died in 1870, the house passed to his widow and later to his daughters Lucretia Edwards and Ella Barton. Ella, her husband Willis Barton, a banker and broker who was also a descendant of a politically prominent Staten Island family, and their five children moved to the house in 1892. The Bartons were leading citizens of Richmondtown who contributed to its history and development. In 1921 the house was acquired by grocer Nicola Aquilino; family members occupied it until 1966. The house has been a part of Historic Richmond Town since the 1950s and underwent exterior restoration in the 1970s. The Development of Richmondtown Richmond County, encompassing all of Staten Island, was established in 1683 as one of the twelve original counties of New York, with Stony Brook, now Egbertville, its official county seat. Previously, the residents of Staten Island had relied on the Court of Sessions at Gravesend, Brooklyn, for the administration of laws, while the center of political activity on the island was at Oude Dorp, near the present South Beach. In 1711, the county government built a prison in the tiny village of Coccles Town. This was considered a superior place for conducting governmental business due to its location at the head of the navigable Fresh Kills and at the junction of several important roads. In 1729, Coccles Town was officially chosen to be the new county seat and was renamed Richmondtown. A new county courthouse was constructed there that year. British troops occupied Richmondtown during the Revolutionary War, establishing quarters in many of the village's buildings, burning the court house and other buildings upon their departure. Little development occurred during the next thirty years; however, a second county courthouse was constructed on Arthur Kill Road in 1793. Richmondtown began to grow around 1800 and was incorporated as a village within the Town of Southfield in 1823. By 1828 the first County Clerk's and Surrogate's Offices were constructed to the east of the jail. The famous hotel, Richmond County Hall, was built around 1829 and soon became a popular gathering place for political and social events. The town's first public school opened about 1830. Sensing the development potential of the town, Henry I. Seaman, a New York merchant who was secretary of the company that operated the plank road (later Richmond Avenue), purchased ninety acres of farmland to the east of the town center in 1836. Seaman had the land laid out into two new streets, Center Street and Court Place, and 25' by 100' building lots. A large plot on Center Street opposite Court Place was set aside for the construction of a new courthouse (the Third County Courthouse, now the Historic Richmond Town Visitors Center, built 1837, a designated New York City Landmark). Seaman also built several houses, known as "Seaman Cottages," and sold two corner lots to Austin Burke and Stephen D. Stephens, who constructed their own residences. Due to the financial panic of 1837, Seaman was forced to sell his Richmondtown property, which eventually passed to Harmon Cropsey in 1854. During the 1840s, the village continued to expand, in part because of the construction of a new stone bridge over Fresh Kills Creek at the junction of Richmond Road and Arthur Kills Road. The Washington Hotel was also built around 1840. Around 1845, Isaac Marsh began construction of a carriage manufactory opposite the hotel. The County Clerk's and Surrogate's Office (now the Historical Museum, a designated New York City Landmark) and a jail were constructed in 1848 and 1860, respect
Edwards-Barton House
Edwards-Barton House
Historic Richmond Town, Staten Island, New York City, New York Landmarks Preservation Commission June 26, 2001; Designation List 328 LP-2093 This two-and-a-half story frame house with wood-clapboard siding is one of the most impressive mid-nineteenth-century houses in Richmondtown, the eighteenth- and nineteenth-century governmental center of Staten Island. Built in 1869 for Webley Edwards, a prosperous businessman and government official, the house is located at the intersection of Richmond Road and Court Place on one of the most prominent sites in the village. The house is a fine and well-preserved example of a popular mid-nineteenth-century rural house type which is well represented in many parts of the country but is now very unusual in New York City. A later example of this house type, the symmetrically-planned center-hall house with a side-gabled roof fronted by a prominent center cross gable, it is embellished with handsome Italianate and Second Empire detailing. Notable features include the heavy molded door and window surrounds, bracketed cornices and bay widows on the side elevations. Edwards became wealthy developing property in Port Richmond inherited by his wife Deborah Mersereau Edwards. He held various county offices in the 1850s and 1860s and was serving as county treasurer in 1869 when this house was erected. After Edwards died in 1870, the house passed to his widow and later to his daughters Lucretia Edwards and Ella Barton. Ella, her husband Willis Barton, a banker and broker who was also a descendant of a politically prominent Staten Island family, and their five children moved to the house in 1892. The Bartons were leading citizens of Richmondtown who contributed to its history and development. In 1921 the house was acquired by grocer Nicola Aquilino; family members occupied it until 1966. The house has been a part of Historic Richmond Town since the 1950s and underwent exterior restoration in the 1970s. The Development of Richmondtown Richmond County, encompassing all of Staten Island, was established in 1683 as one of the twelve original counties of New York, with Stony Brook, now Egbertville, its official county seat. Previously, the residents of Staten Island had relied on the Court of Sessions at Gravesend, Brooklyn, for the administration of laws, while the center of political activity on the island was at Oude Dorp, near the present South Beach. In 1711, the county government built a prison in the tiny village of Coccles Town. This was considered a superior place for conducting governmental business due to its location at the head of the navigable Fresh Kills and at the junction of several important roads. In 1729, Coccles Town was officially chosen to be the new county seat and was renamed Richmondtown. A new county courthouse was constructed there that year. British troops occupied Richmondtown during the Revolutionary War, establishing quarters in many of the village's buildings, burning the court house and other buildings upon their departure. Little development occurred during the next thirty years; however, a second county courthouse was constructed on Arthur Kill Road in 1793. Richmondtown began to grow around 1800 and was incorporated as a village within the Town of Southfield in 1823. By 1828 the first County Clerk's and Surrogate's Offices were constructed to the east of the jail. The famous hotel, Richmond County Hall, was built around 1829 and soon became a popular gathering place for political and social events. The town's first public school opened about 1830. Sensing the development potential of the town, Henry I. Seaman, a New York merchant who was secretary of the company that operated the plank road (later Richmond Avenue), purchased ninety acres of farmland to the east of the town center in 1836. Seaman had the land laid out into two new streets, Center Street and Court Place, and 25' by 100' building lots. A large plot on Center Street opposite Court Place was set aside for the construction of a new courthouse (the Third County Courthouse, now the Historic Richmond Town Visitors Center, built 1837, a designated New York City Landmark). Seaman also built several houses, known as "Seaman Cottages," and sold two corner lots to Austin Burke and Stephen D. Stephens, who constructed their own residences. Due to the financial panic of 1837, Seaman was forced to sell his Richmondtown property, which eventually passed to Harmon Cropsey in 1854. During the 1840s, the village continued to expand, in part because of the construction of a new stone bridge over Fresh Kills Creek at the junction of Richmond Road and Arthur Kills Road. The Washington Hotel was also built around 1840. Around 1845, Isaac Marsh began construction of a carriage manufactory opposite the hotel. The County Clerk's and Surrogate's Office (now the Historical Museum, a designated New York City Landmark) and a jail were constructed in 1848 and 1860, respectively. St. Pat

college house decorating ideas
college house decorating ideas
Wallmonkeys Peel and Stick Wall Graphic - Fettes College - 24"W x 18"H
WallMonkeys wall graphics are printed on the highest quality re-positionable, self-adhesive fabric paper. Each order is printed in-house and on-demand. WallMonkeys uses premium materials & state-of-the-art production technologies. Our white fabric material is superior to vinyl decals. You can literally see and feel the difference. Our wall graphics apply in minutes and won't damage your paint or leave any mess. PLEASE double check the size of the image you are ordering prior to clicking the 'ADD TO CART' button. Our graphics are offered in a variety of sizes and prices.
WallMonkeys are intended for indoor use only.
Printed on-demand in the United States Your order will ship within 3 business days, often sooner. Some orders require the full 3 days to allow dark colors and inks to fully dry prior to shipping. Quality is worth waiting an extra day for!
Removable and will not leave a mark on your walls.
'Fotolia' trademark will be removed when printed.
Our catalog of over 10 million images is perfect for virtually any use: school projects, trade shows, teachers classrooms, colleges, nurseries, college dorms, event planners, and corporations of all size.