Station Teaching

 

In station teaching, teachers divide content and students. Students rotate from one teacher to another and also to an independent station so that each teacher repeats instruction three times and each student accesses both teachers and the independent station. If appropriate, the third station could be set up to require that students work in pairs instead of independently.

 

WHEN TO USE

• When content is complex but not hierarchical

• In lessons in which part of planned instruction is review

• When several topics comprise instruction

 

AMOUNT OF PLANNING

• Medium

 

SAMPLE APPLICATIONS

• During language arts instruction when one station will address comprehension of a recently-read piece of literature, one station will focus on editing of a writing assignment, and one station will consist of an activity related to a skill being taught.

• In social studies to examine the geography, economy, and culture of a region or country.

• In math, to teach a new process while reviewing applications of other concepts already presented.

 

OTHER COMMENTS

• Variations of station teaching, carried out across two days, are sometimes more appropriate in secondary settings with traditional class periods.

• If students cannot work independently, two groups can be formed. If a student teacher is available, four groups might be arranged.

 

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Friend & Cook (2004)

Co-Teaching Approaches (continued)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

*Cook and Friend (2004).  Co-Teaching: Principles, Practices, and Pragmatics, New Mexico Public Education Department Quarterly Special Education Meeting, Albuquerque, NM, April 29, 2004.

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