Random Cipher or Cryptogram

(much more difficult!)

One type of substitution cipher isn't so simple. Sometimes the code alphabet will be in random order, and you won't be given any clue to solve the code at all! You'll have to be quite smart to crack this problem.


Example:

QAFWKA   J   CZ   UFQ   UCQWECDDM   AFURTQ,   J   CZ   TF   TFZRQJZRT   IM   PACUPR.  
VJDDJCZ   TACBRTNRCER

(Before we work it out, maybe you would like to take a look at these Tips for Solving Cryptograms.)

Well, first of all we have a word J, which must be either I or A. Could it be A? Well, it's followed by a two-letter word J CZ. There aren't many two-letter words that can fit after an A, so think about I instead. Hmmmm.... `I AM'! Of course.

So now we have J=I, C=A, Z=M. Let's fill them in:

QAFWKA   i   am   UFQ   UaQWEaDDM   AFURTQ,   i   am   TF   TFZRQimRT   IM   PAaUPR.
ViDDiam   TAaBRTNRaER.

Now think hard about those last two long words. `ViDDiam'. It looks like a name. Take a wild guess. Could it be? Yes, of course! WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE.

Now you're almost finished! You've got another 8 letters:

QhFWKh i am UFQ UaQWrallM hFUesQ, i am sF sFZeQimes IM PhaUPe.
william shakespeare.

Now look at words which are almost complete. 'sFZeQimes' and 'sF' are a good place to start...

In fact it's simple enough from here so you can finish it yourself!


Here's a cryptogram for you to solve:

LCJL'Y WZK YVJFF YLKO PWN VJZ,
WZK URJZL FKJO PWN VJZBRZS.
- ZKRF JNVYLNWZU