Restarts

There was a modest drop in the number of set-play goals (70 in 2011/12), in comparison with the two previous seasons (82 in each). ln percentage terms, therefore, the last three campaigns have seen a gradual decrease from 25% to 23% to 22%.
On the other hand, the number of penalty goals, not including those taken during a shoot-out, has risen year on year, from 14 to 24 to 28. This has coincided with the introduction of the additional referees at either end of the pitch, and their influence on refereeing decisions could be part of the reason for this trend. 
Goals from throw-ins also increased, but this was only from one or two game, teams were the successfully execute of particular move.
Although the rate of scoring remained stable, the return on investment from corner kicks was again unimpressive. For the second season in a row, it took, on average, 40 corners to produce one goal. in 2011/12 Champion League 1,250 efforts to deliver 27 goals. Four times in 125 games, the winning goal came from a corner, four times it contributed to a draw, and nine times  it provided a significant contribution to a successful result. (UEFA Technical Report) As usual, corners were a valuable weapon in some teams' armouries but, in an aspect of the game where delivery of the ball is everything, the figures provided some food for thought.  For example, The Munich final was a case in point: Bayern took 20 corners with nothing to show for them, while Chelsea were awarded one and Didier Drogba proceeded to score with a header from an inswinging cross by Juan Mata. 
I think a lot of effort goes rightfully into defending the restart then the attacking, because of the little return, but we know sure ,restarts can effect or change the outcome of the game if we don't prepared. The following outline will break down restarts into very general but important aspects of play. Coaches should look to identify tactical situations and how these situations effects individual responsibilities and overall team shape.
Corner Kicks
        
        Defending
  • Respond quickly to the whistle. 
  • Pressure at ten yards to prevent driven service and deal with short corner.

  • Defend near post space.
  • Defend far post space. 
  • Appropriate player match-ups – organization.  (Zonal, Man to man)
  • Track runners & match Up.
  • Defend spaces in and around the box. 
  • Clearing the lines.
  • Attack the ball. 
  • Goalkeeper role and starting position (inswing/outswing).
  • Distribute rebound help along the clearance.
  • Point of reference (Exit) for break away.
  • Mount a counter attack.

  Attacking 

  • Respond quickly to the whistle.

  • Short or long.

  • Election of server(s) – quality of the delivery.
  • Determine target areas. Serve to designated area.
  • Deployment of players.
( Utilization of a player(s) with special skill.
  • Distribution, 
heading, timing, physical and psychological dimensions
  • Interference or distraction.
  • Rebounds and second changes
  • Defensive organization, so as not to be counter attacked.
  • Attack the ball or space.
        Goal Kicks

  • Team shape.

  • Maintain possession (safety).

  • Short vs. long – possession/territory (explain). 
  • Train Goalkeeper to take goal kicks. 
  • Away from key defender.
  • Se up counter attacking option.
Free Kicks (Defending)

    In our attacking third
  • Respond quickly to the whistle.

  • Recover behind and inside the line of the ball to the goal and opponents.

  • Pressure immediate area around the ball.

  • Compactness behind the ball.

  • Proper depth to avoid one long ball, putting everyone out of the game.
  • Appropriate match-ups – organization.

  • Attack the ball.
  • Goalkeeper starting position.
       
    In the Middle Third
  • Respond quickly to the whistle.

  • Recover behind and inside the ball and opponent.

  • Pressure to prevent short/quick restart.

  • Pressure at ten yards to prevent driven services.

  • General guideline – last line of defense should not be deeper than the edge of the penalty box.

  • Appropriate match-ups – organization. 
  • Attack the ball.

  • Goalkeeper starting position
    In Our Defending Third
            From the Flanks

  • Respond quickly to the whistle.

  • Recover behind and inside the ball and opponents. 
  • Pressure the ball to avoid quick restart.

  • Pressure at ten yards to prevent driven services.

  • Cover vital spaces in the box.

  • Appropriate match-ups – organization.

  • Attack the ball.
  • Goalkeeper starting position. 
    From Central (Shooting Distance)

  • Respond quickly to the whistle (direct or indirect). 
  • Pressure to prevent quick shot at goal or pass.

  • Setting up a wall.

  • Construction,Numbers in the wall (2, 3, 4, 5 or more).

  • Organization of remaining players.

  • Attack the ball.

  • Goalkeeper starting position. 



Free Kicks (Attacking)
        
    In our defending third
  • Respond quickly to the whistle.

  • Maintain possession (safety).

  • Short vs. long –possession/territory.

  • Team shape – if long, allow time to organize. 

    in the Middle Third

  • Respond quickly to the whistle.

  • Maintain possession.

  • Team shape – if long, allow time to organize.

  • Maintain balance to avoid counter.

  • Quality of service is the key.

  • Leave spaces alive to receive or attack the ball.
    In Our Attacking Third
  • From the Flanks

  • Respond quickly to the whistle.

  • Maintain possession.

  • Who should serve.

  • Organization of remaining players. 
  • Maintain balance.

  • Target areas, Behind the wall,/timing of runs.

  • Quality of service.

  • Attack the ball. 

    From Central (Shooting Distance)

  • Respond quickly to the whistle (direct or indirect). 
  • Recognition of a quick free kick.

  • Selection of shooter(s) – quality.

  • Deployment of remaining players.

  • In the penalty area.

  • To maintain balance to prevent counter. 


Throw-Ins 

Throw-ins should be treated like any free kick and the aforementioned guidelines apply. 
In general most teams lose concentration when the ball goes out of play. However, from a defensive perspective this is an ideal opportunity to organize quickly and regain possession. 
  • Respond quickly to the referee’s signal. 
  • Mark the thrower. 
  • Pressure opponents and lock up spaces around the ball. 
  • Maintain balance and shape. 
  • Press in ball side half, safety in the other.
  • Attack long throws.