Sleep Reports

When you submit a report you will get an email showing an analysis of your sleep pattern along aggregated statistics for everyone. Here is a sample:

Here's a review of your sleep pattern.


The higher blue line shows when you were asleep and the red line shows an estimate of your basic alertness.

You slept an average of 7.8 hours per day. Your average alertness was 90%.

For the past seven days the average reporting person slept 7.3 hours per day and had 88% alertness.

Here is a summary of everyone's average daily sleep hours in the past 31 days.

Dhiraj
Hawaiii
Coby
Monique
Prasad
Valerie
Lena
LillianTiffany
ArashnoorJackie
SarahHaley
ShashankChristopher
ChristianArthur
HugoEva
AlexanderLaurenCheryl
GabrielSharonYagamiJoshua B.
TanmayaRishabhDanielleSophia
HyunjaeThomasXimenaTom W.
SleeplessZombieAnonymous0BenNathan
PeterAfshaanLingDianeGrace C.StuartMichael
345678910






The analysis in the reports is based on "A unified mathematical model to quantify performance impairment for both chronic sleep restriction and total sleep deprivation." It tests a theory that sleeping replenishes your basic alertness according to an asymptotic process and being awake uses up alertness, also following an asymptotic process. They tested it by asking experimental subjects to sleep for varying amounts and then measuring their ability to react to a signal that occurred at random times. 

This chart shows the predicted altertness for a range of people who regularly sleep various number of hours a night for a week.
The person sleeping 9 hours per night gradually increases her alertness, averaging 116% of what a person sleeping 8 hours does. The person not sleeping at all for a week loses alertness constantly, averaging 0% of the 8-hour person's alertness.

The situation is a little more complicated, however. In addition to your sleep habits, your alertness is also affected by the circadian rhythm that fluctuates on a 24-hour cycle, making you more alert in the middle of the day. Here is the a chart derived from the same data that generated the report above.
The person still has higher basic alertness later in the week, but is more alert each afternoon than in the early morning of his best day.
Comments