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This site provides a central location for information about the INFORMS Student Chapter at CMU.

In particular, you will see abstracts of upcoming talks for our student seminar. The seminar is currently (Spring 2015) organized by Aleksandr Kazachkov and Christian Tjandraatmadja. Please contact them if you are interested in giving a talk.

In Spring 2015, talks will usually be on Mondays at 6:30pm, but may be arranged on special days depending on speaker availability.

For more info, see the announcements below or on the Quick Calendar in the sidebar.


04/10/15 - Review for Vanderbei talk

posted Apr 8, 2015, 12:28 PM by Christian Tjandraatmadja   [ updated Apr 8, 2015, 12:30 PM ]

WHEN: April 10, 2015, 12:00pm

WHERE: GSIA 227

DETAILS:
On Friday, April 10, Robert Vanderbei (Princeton University) will be giving a talk. The seminar will start at 1:30pm in GSIA 322. We will meet at 12:00pm to discuss some necessary background that will hopefully help us better understand the talk. Bring your lunch!

We will look over relevant papers for the talk (http://orfe.princeton.edu/~rvdb/tex/ISMP2006/ismp06.pdf, http://orfe.princeton.edu/~rvdb/tex/newOrbits/newOrbits.pdf, http://www.princeton.edu/~rvdb/tex/ffOpt/ffOptMPCrev4.pdf) and discuss any background as decided by those present at the review session. The slides of the talk are already posted at his website: http://www.princeton.edu/~rvdb/tex/talks/CMU/CMUtalk.pdf.

===
Seminar Information:

Name:  Robert Vanderbei

University:  Princeton University

Date:  April 10, 2015

Time: 1:30 to 3:00 pm

Location:  Tepper Faculty Conference Room 322

Title:  Numerical Optimization Applied to Space-Related Problems

Abstract:  Techniques for numerical optimization have been wildly
successful in an amazingly broad range of applications.   In the talk, I
will go into some detail about two particular applications that are both
``space related''.  The first application is to the design of telescopes
that can achieve unprecedentedly high-contrast making it possible to
directly image extra-solar planets even though their host star is
billions of times brighter and has a very small angular separation from
the planet.  The second application is to use optimization to find new,
interesting, and often exotic solutions to the n-body problem.   Finding
such orbits could inform us as to what type of exoplanetary systems
might exist around other nearby stars.  In these two applications, I
will explain enough of the physics to make the optimization problem
clear and then I will show some of the results we have been able to find
using state-of-the-art numerical optimization algorithms.

3/20/15 - Joseph Huchette and Miles Lubin (MIT ORC)

posted Mar 18, 2015, 10:52 AM by Aleksandr Kazachkov

WHEN: 3/20/2015, 1:30pm - 2:30pm (seminar) and 2:40pm-3:40pm (tutorial)

WHERE: Posner 151

TITLE: JuMP, a modeling language for mathematical optimization

ABSTRACT:
We present JuMP, an open-source optimization modeling language like AMPL, GAMS, YALMIP, and others, which is embedded in Julia, a recently developed language for technical computing. We discuss how JuMP advances the state of the art in modeling languages by exploiting the technical features of Julia like just-in-time compilation and metaprogramming to obtain performance competitive with that of commercial modeling languages and hand-written C++ code for linear, conic, nonlinear, and mixed-integer (linear and nonlinear) optimization. We describe a number of advanced applications of JuMP and extensions to JuMP, in particular for optimization under uncertainty. The seminar presentation will take up to one hour. After a short break, the seminar continues with a hands-on tutorial session that will last an hour.

3/20/15 - Preparation for JuMP seminar and tutorial

posted Mar 18, 2015, 10:49 AM by Aleksandr Kazachkov

WHEN: 3/20/15, 11:00am

WHERE: Posner 388

DETAILS:
On Friday, March 20, Joseph Huchette and Miles Lubin (MIT ORC) will be giving a talk and leading a tutorial about JuMP, a new modeling language for mathematical optimization. The seminar will start at 1:30pm in Posner 151. We will meet at 11:00am to get a little preliminary familiarity with JuMP syntax, as well as ensuring Julia runs correctly on our computers. Please see the attached installation instructions.

===
Seminar Information:

Name: Joseph Huchette and Miles Lubin

University: MIT ORC

Date: March 20, 2015

Time: 1:30-2:30 (seminar) and 2:40-3:40 (hands-on tutorial)

Location: Posner 151

Title: JuMP, a modeling language for mathematical optimization

Abstract:
We present JuMP, an open-source optimization modeling language like AMPL, GAMS, YALMIP, and others, which is embedded in Julia, a recently developed language for technical computing. We discuss how JuMP advances the state of the art in modeling languages by exploiting the technical features of Julia like just-in-time compilation and metaprogramming to obtain performance competitive with that of commercial modeling languages and hand-written C++ code for linear, conic, nonlinear, and mixed-integer (linear and nonlinear) optimization. We describe a number of advanced applications of JuMP and extensions to JuMP, in particular for optimization under uncertainty. The seminar presentation will take up to one hour. After a short break, the seminar continues with a hands-on tutorial session that will last an hour.

3/6/15 - Review for Goyal talk

posted Mar 5, 2015, 7:31 AM by Christian Tjandraatmadja

WHEN: March 6, 2015, 10:00am

WHERE: GSIA 205

DETAILS:
On Friday, March 6, Vineet Goyal (Columbia University) will be giving a talk. The seminar will start at 1:30pm in GSIA 322. We will meet at 10:00am to discuss some necessary background that will hopefully help us better understand the talk.

Please read or glance through the paper in advance, and we will work through any particular questions together. The paper can be found here: http://www.columbia.edu/~vg2277/static-ar-paper.pdf

===
Seminar Information:

Name:  Vineet Goyal

University:  Columbia University

Date:  March 6, 2015

Time: 1:30 to 3:00 pm

Location:  Faculty Conference Room 322

Title:  Static vs Adaptive Solutions in Dynamic Optimization

Abstract: We consider a two-stage robust linear optimization problem with
uncertain packing constraints. These arise in many applications including
resource allocation and scheduling with uncertain resource requirements.
An adaptive or a dynamic solution specifies the solution for each possible
uncertain second-stage scenario; computing an optimal adaptive solution is
often intractable. On the other hand, a static solution is a single
solution feasible for all second-stage scenarios; it can be computed
efficiently in most cases. However, a static solution is believed to be
highly conservative as compared to an adjustable solution.

We give a tight characterization of the performance of static solutions
for the two-stage linear optimization problem with uncertain packing
constraints and give a bound the additivity gap. In particular, we show
that for a fairly general class of uncertainty sets, a static solution is
optimal. Furthermore, when a static solution is not optimal, we give a
tight approximation bound on the performance of the static solution that
is related to the geometric properties of the uncertainty set. This work
shows that a static solution provides a good approximation for the
adjustable robust linear optimization problem for a broad class of
uncertainty sets.

3/2/15 - Monday discussion dinner with Christian Tjandraatmadja

posted Mar 2, 2015, 8:04 AM by Aleksandr Kazachkov

WHEN: 3/2/15, 6:30pm

WHERE: Posner 384

DETAILS:
We will be hosting the Monday Discussion Dinner in Room 384 of 
Posner Hall (Tepper) at 6:30pm (NOTE THE ROOM CHANGE). Our main speaker will be Christian Tjandraatmadja whose topic will be "Aiming and Shooting: Thoughts on an Empirical Exploration of Facets".

If you'd like to join and order food, please fill out the order form by 5pm today at the latest:

http://goo.gl/forms/urmbYT3QIu

Hope to see you there!

===
Deadline for food orders: 5:00pm the day of the dinner

Every week we get together to eat food and talk about interesting problems.
One person nominates themselves to talk about an idea they are thinking about, or a problem they think is interesting while we eat dinner together.

This is designed to be a casual and friendly environment for students to bounce ideas off others. 

Faculty are very welcome to attend and contribute!

2/23/15 - Monday discussion dinner with Aleksandr Kazachkov

posted Feb 23, 2015, 10:32 AM by Aleksandr Kazachkov   [ updated Feb 23, 2015, 10:32 AM ]

WHEN: 2/23/15, 6:30 pm

WHERE: Posner 388

DETAILS:
We will be hosting the Monday Discussion Dinner in Posner 388. Our main speaker today will be Aleksandr Kazachkov who will be talking about talking about algorithms, complexity results, and open problems in Vertex Enumeration.

If you'd like to join and order food, please fill out the order form by 5pm today at the latest:

http://goo.gl/forms/urmbYT3QIu

Hope to see you there!

===
Deadline for food orders: 5:00 pm

Every week we get together to eat food and talk about interesting problems.
One person nominates themselves to talk about an idea they are thinking about, or a problem they think is interesting while we eat dinner together.

This is designed to be a casual and friendly environment for students to bounce ideas off others. 

Faculty are very welcome to attend and contribute!

2/16/15 - General meeting and pizza social

posted Feb 12, 2015, 12:10 PM by Aleksandr Kazachkov

WHEN: Monday, 2/16/15 at 6:30pm

WHERE: Posner 388 (take the elevator in Posner [not GSIA] to the third floor and it will be to the left, around the corner)

DETAILS:
This is a general meeting and pizza social. In the meeting portion, we will discuss the events planned for this semester and take suggestions for the future. This social is open to anyone at Carnegie Mellon who is interested in INFORMS-related activities, regardless of sub-discipline or particular focus area. Come meet other students all across campus with similar interests!

2/13/15 - Review for Schmidt talk

posted Feb 11, 2015, 1:41 PM by Christian Tjandraatmadja

WHEN: February 13, 2015, 11:00am

WHERE: Posner 388

DETAILS:
On Friday, February 13, Daniel Schmidt (University of Cologne, visiting at Carnegie Mellon University) will be giving a talk. The seminar will start at 1:30pm in GSIA 322. We will meet at 11:00am to discuss some necessary background that will hopefully help us better understand the talk.

Please glance through the paper in advance, and we will work through any particular questions together. The paper can be found here: http://www.optimization-online.org/DB_HTML/2015/02/4763.html

===
Seminar information:

Name:  Daniel Schmidt

University:  University of Cologne visiting at Carnegie Mellon University

Date:  February 13, 2015

Time: 1:30 to 3:00 pm

Location:  Faculty Conference Room 322

Title:  Robust Network Design with a Single-Commodity and Uncertain
Demands

Abstract:  Given a set of sites with potential links, a cost function and
traffic requirements, Network Design is the task to find minimum cost
capacities for the links such that all traffic requirements can be met.
Unfortunately, network traffic is very hard to predict and varies
substantially. At the same time, locally insufficient network capacity can
lead to the breakdown of the entire network. This has led to the
development of Robust Network Design methods that can include different
traffic scenarios in the optimization process.

In this talk, we consider such a method in the form of an exact branch-
and-cut algorithm. It computes robust solutions for a network design
problem that is based on a single-commodity flow. We show a cut-based
integer linear programming formulation that allows us to specify the set
of traffic scenarios as both a finite list and as a feasible region of a
set of linear inequalities. We show cut-separation procedures for both
cases and give additional 3-partition inequalities that further strengthen
our formulation. These additional inequalities can be separated as Zero-
Half-Cuts. Computational results show the effectiveness of the approach.

2/9/15 - Monday discussion dinner with Thiago Serra

posted Feb 9, 2015, 7:25 AM by Aleksandr Kazachkov

WHEN: 2/9/15, 6:30 pm

WHERE: Tepper PhD Lounge

DETAILS:
We will be hosting the Monday Discussion Dinner in the Tepper PhD lounge (room 201) at 6:30. Our main speaker today will be Thiago Serra who will be talking about Disjunctive Cuts.  If you would like to join and order food, please fill out the order form by 5pm today at the latest:

http://goo.gl/forms/PMWB6Bw4x4

Hope to see you there!

===
Deadline for food orders: 5:00 pm

Every week we get together to eat food and talk about interesting problems.
One person nominates themselves to talk about an idea they are thinking about, or a problem they think is interesting while we eat dinner together.

This is designed to be a casual and friendly environment for students to bounce ideas off others. 

Faculty are very welcome to attend and contribute!

2/2/15 - Monday discussion dinner with Ryo Kimura

posted Feb 5, 2015, 9:54 AM by Aleksandr Kazachkov   [ updated Feb 5, 2015, 9:55 AM ]

WHEN: 2/2/15, 6:30 pm

WHERE: Tepper PhD Lounge

DETAILS:
We will be hosting our third Monday Discussion Dinner in the Tepper PhD lounge (room 201) at 6.30. Our main speaker today will be Ryo Kimura who will be talking about Petri Nets.  If you would like to join and order food, please fill out the order form by 5pm today at the latest:

http://goo.gl/forms/PMWB6Bw4x4

Hope to see you there!

===
Deadline for food orders: 5:00 pm

Every week we get together to eat food and talk about interesting problems.
One person nominates themselves to talk about an idea they are thinking about, or a problem they think is interesting while we eat dinner together.

This is designed to be a casual and friendly environment for students to bounce ideas off others. 

Faculty are very welcome to attend and contribute!

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