RELOADING CLEANING BRASS : RELOADING CLEANING

Reloading Cleaning Brass : How To Clean Oil Based Paint Off Brushes : How To Clean Acrylic Tubs.

Reloading Cleaning Brass


reloading cleaning brass
    reloading
  • Load (something, esp. a gun that has been fired) again
  • (reload) recharge: load anew; "She reloaded the gun carefully"
  • Handloading or reloading is the process of loading firearm cartridges or shotgun shells by assembling the individual components (brass/shotshell, primer, powder, and bullet/shot), rather than purchasing completely-assembled, factory-loaded cartridges.
  • In a reloading scam, a victim is repeatedly approached by con artists, often until "sucked dry". This form of fraud is perpetrated on those more susceptible to pressure after the first losses, perhaps because of hopes to recover money previously invested, perhaps because of inability to say "no"
    cleaning
  • Remove the innards of (fish or poultry) prior to cooking
  • the act of making something clean; "he gave his shoes a good cleaning"
  • Make (something or someone) free of dirt, marks, or mess, esp. by washing, wiping, or brushing
  • make clean by removing dirt, filth, or unwanted substances from; "Clean the stove!"; "The dentist cleaned my teeth"
  • (clean) free from dirt or impurities; or having clean habits; "children with clean shining faces"; "clean white shirts"; "clean dishes"; "a spotlessly clean house"; "cats are clean animals"
    brass
  • an alloy of copper and zinc
  • A yellow alloy of copper and zinc
  • a wind instrument that consists of a brass tube (usually of variable length) that is blown by means of a cup-shaped or funnel-shaped mouthpiece
  • A decorative object made of such an alloy
  • administration: the persons (or committees or departments etc.) who make up a body for the purpose of administering something; "he claims that the present administration is corrupt"; "the governance of an association is responsible to its members"; "he quickly became recognized as a member of
  • A memorial, typically medieval, consisting of a flat piece of inscribed brass, laid in the floor or set into the wall of a church
reloading cleaning brass - BENCH TOPICS:
BENCH TOPICS: CLEANING BRASS-REVISITED: Wet cleaning your brass with easy to find products!
BENCH TOPICS: CLEANING BRASS-REVISITED: Wet cleaning your brass with easy to find products!
11 photos, 7 Pages, 1164 Words

An excerpt from the article: There are of course several ways of cleaning brass. Vibratory cleaners are very common as are tumblers. Both use dry polishing media such as walnut shells or corn cob to which you can add a polishing compound. I used to use this method in a vibratory set up. There are a couple of reasons I stopped using this method. First off, it was noisy, extremely noisy. The cats climbed the walls and the wife chewed me a new one each time I started the contraction up. I tried to sound proof the device in a box and put the box in the garage, but still, it buzzed throughout the house. Secondly, a health reason, some of the dust that comes off of the spent brass is left over primer compound and lead bullet bits. I noticed while I was pouring the finished brass off, there was this dust cloud released, stuff that I did not care to breathe in. And finally, I always ended up having to pick bits of polishing compound out of the primer pocket. This is a ROYAL pain to tell you the truth. Sure, when you go through and do resizing, the decapper should push it out, but I always feared that something would still be plugging the primer hole. So, I looked around and modified other people’s ideas and added some of my own and came up with the following technique. This technique uses a washing method. The only downfall that I have figured out is that it takes at least one extra days step in order for the brass to dry out before reloading. Other than that, it is quieter, it is as fast, it is cheaper and it does not produce any harmful dusts.

11 photos, 7 Pages, 1164 Words

An excerpt from the article: There are of course several ways of cleaning brass. Vibratory cleaners are very common as are tumblers. Both use dry polishing media such as walnut shells or corn cob to which you can add a polishing compound. I used to use this method in a vibratory set up. There are a couple of reasons I stopped using this method. First off, it was noisy, extremely noisy. The cats climbed the walls and the wife chewed me a new one each time I started the contraction up. I tried to sound proof the device in a box and put the box in the garage, but still, it buzzed throughout the house. Secondly, a health reason, some of the dust that comes off of the spent brass is left over primer compound and lead bullet bits. I noticed while I was pouring the finished brass off, there was this dust cloud released, stuff that I did not care to breathe in. And finally, I always ended up having to pick bits of polishing compound out of the primer pocket. This is a ROYAL pain to tell you the truth. Sure, when you go through and do resizing, the decapper should push it out, but I always feared that something would still be plugging the primer hole. So, I looked around and modified other people’s ideas and added some of my own and came up with the following technique. This technique uses a washing method. The only downfall that I have figured out is that it takes at least one extra days step in order for the brass to dry out before reloading. Other than that, it is quieter, it is as fast, it is cheaper and it does not produce any harmful dusts.

81% (17)
7mm WSM -- High-Country Hunter
7mm WSM -- High-Country Hunter
I use Winchester-brand brass and Winchester Large Rifle Magnum primers. My current load is 64.0 grains of H4831sc for the Hornady 162s (2950 fps) and 61.0 grains of H4831sc for the Sierra 175s (2830 fps). The only sizing dies I have used are the Basic Redding FL dies--I have since started using the Forester Ultra-Seater and used it when I shot the outstanding groups. My reloading technique is pretty basic. I full-length size and trim all to length. I use the RCBS powered Trim Mate™ station to do most of the brass prep. I do use the VLD case mouth deburrer. I uniform the primer pocket and chamfer as well. I then fire-form those prepped cases. I've noted that the new brass usually shoots just as well as fire-formed cases. I then use the FL die to bump the shoulder back .002". I haven't really noticed and major difference between Forester and Redding dies except price. I don't have any "special" secret loading techniques. If you use quality components, I've found that you don't need to weigh this weigh that etc. I tried that for years and it never really showed results to justify the time and effort. I quit doing all the weighing ( except for bullets ) and I shoot just as well. The two things I am anal about are the powder charge and seating depth--these all have to be exactly the same for each round! I do take time to uniform the brass. First, when I get a bag of brass, I'll check to make sure all the flash holes are centered, and I'll pitch the ones that aren't. Then I'll measure the shortest case and trim all to that length (after ensuring that fits my chamber). Next, I'll uniform the primer pockets, and debur and bevel the flash hole on both sides. Beveling both sides is one trick I think helps keep ES down. By beveling the flash side it basically takes the flash and tapers/funnels it to the hole. I think you get more consitency with the primer flash this way. Finally I'll debur/champfer the inside and outside of the neck using a VLD chamferer. After firing the cases once, I clean them all up and make one pass on the neck turner just to "clean" the necks to a consistient diameter. Note, I am not necessarily turning for a specific diameter because I have enough clearance to start with. I do this light turn just for consistency. Sometimes the neck turner might only shave a bit off one side.
Cleaning out primer pockets
Cleaning out primer pockets
Cleaning the primer pockets on spent brass (cartridge case). The brass has been used once before (as in, fired), then cleaned (by tumbling), and resized. The primer pockets often contain carbon residue, which needs to be cleaned out so the primer can seat properly.

reloading cleaning brass
reloading cleaning brass
Frankford Arsenal Master Tumbler Kit
Clean, attractive brass should be the goal of every reloader. Cleaning brass by tumbling is the economical, safe first step in assembling quality handloads. Besides ensuring long life for the most valuable component of your ammunition, cleaning your brass will help reduce wear and tear on your expensive reloading dies, not to mention the chamber of your firearm. Grit and grime from uncleaned brass can become imbedded in the inner surfaces of your sizing dies, scratching and marring every subsequent case. The same grime can be expected to accelerate wear in the chamber and feeding system of your rifle or handgun. The Frankford Arsenal Tumbler Kit includes all components necessary to tumble brass with professional results.

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