HORSE RACE DECORATIONS - RACE DECORATIONS

Horse Race Decorations - Thanksgiving Decorations For Kids To Make - Room Decor Themes.

Horse Race Decorations


horse race decorations
    decorations
  • A thing that serves as an ornament
  • (decorate) make more attractive by adding ornament, colour, etc.; "Decorate the room for the party"; "beautify yourself for the special day"
  • The process or art of decorating or adorning something
  • (decorate) award a mark of honor, such as a medal, to; "He was decorated for his services in the military"
  • (decorate) deck: be beautiful to look at; "Flowers adorned the tables everywhere"
  • Ornamentation
    horse race
  • A very close contest
  • (horse racing) the sport of racing horses
  • A race between two or more horses ridden by jockeys
  • compete in a horse race
  • a contest of speed between horses; usually held for the purpose of betting
horse race decorations - Vinyl Wall
Vinyl Wall Decal Sticker Jockey Horse Race 60"x41"
Vinyl Wall Decal Sticker Jockey Horse Race 60"x41"
The newest interior design trend is adding vinyl art on interior walls. It's easier than hiring an artist and a lot cheaper. The smaller pieces can be put up within minutes. The larger pieces takes a little longer. The decals can be applied to all smooth surfaces, such as walls, windows, tiles, mirrors and doors. Each of our designs come with easy instructions to follow. This is an original design from Stickerbrand Design. All other sellers are selling knockoffs, please be aware before you buy. Our quality & workmanship are superior to all others.

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Fantastic hand decoration
Fantastic hand decoration
Ornate jewelry - family heirlooms and investments - decorate the hands of many Tibetan women at national festivals.This girl wears gold and silver rings with coral and dzi bead stones on her fingers, and ivory bangles on her wrists. Huge, heavy, and very beautiful. I love the big rings and bracelets on the feminine hands and wrists. Her hands rest on a huge gold and silver prayer box, part of a hanging system of amulets below her waist. Prayer box and amulets are gold and silver repousse and weigh more than a kilogram each. Tibetans only ever wear pure 24k gold, mixing it is considered a sacriledge ===================================================== Ornaments make up most of the life savings of many Khampa families, and so play an important role in Tibetan families' lives as well as in announcing the social status of the wearers. They are saved up for over many years and handed down for centuries from generation to generation within families. Until very recently, these families were nomadic and have to move every few months because of the snowy seasons in the Himalayas, so Khampas have always needed to store their wealth in portable form. So being unable to store wealth in the form of estates or houses or land or in a bank, for millenia wealth has been stored in art, precious fabrics, and particularly into ornaments. Their culture is very conservative about the type of ornaments favored: for thousands of years jewelry made from amber, turquoise and coral have been worn because the stones are believed to hold spiritual power. Gold and silver and also naturally found in Tibet, and the use of these metals by the wealthy also goes back thousands of years. Their ornaments are very chunky, bold and colorful. While the gold earrings that Khampa women wear may have cost them a year or maybe several year's of their salary, ornaments carry so much social status in their society that probably didn't have to think twice about the purchase. To the Khampa people these ornaments have the utmost sentimental value and significance, because they are the physical remnants of generations of their ancestors hard work or success. what these people are wearing is not just their life savings, but also their family history and treasure. this culture has been around for millenia - archeological finds from the 1st century AD in the khampa area unearthed ornaments that are essentially the same in design and materials as today's are. there are also beliefs that the stones provide good luck and protection to disease. dyed red coral is the most sought after stone, but interestingly tibet is very very far from any oceans - all the coral is imported by traders! Religious symbols from Tibetan Buddhism frequency form the designs of pieces, however archeological finds show that the role of ornaments in Tibetan society and peoples' lives long predate the arrival of Buddhism in Tibet. Indeed the beliefs of spiritual protection being provided by coral, amber and turquoise probably originate from the ancient shamanic Bon religion.
Girl's exquisite hand decoration
Girl's exquisite hand decoration
Jeweled bracelets and pure gold rings on the decorate the hand of a beautiful girl at the Litang Horse Festival in 2003. She wore ornate jewels like these from head to toe. ===================================================== Ornaments make up most of the life savings of many Khampa families, and so play an important role in Tibetan families' lives as well as in announcing the social status of the wearers. They are saved up for over many years and handed down for centuries from generation to generation within families. Until very recently, these families were nomadic and have to move every few months because of the snowy seasons in the Himalayas, so Khampas have always needed to store their wealth in portable form. So being unable to store wealth in the form of estates or houses or land or in a bank, for millenia wealth has been stored in art, precious fabrics, and particularly into ornaments. Their culture is very conservative about the type of ornaments favored: for thousands of years jewelry made from amber, turquoise and coral have been worn because the stones are believed to hold spiritual power. Gold and silver and also naturally found in Tibet, and the use of these metals by the wealthy also goes back thousands of years. Their ornaments are very chunky, bold and colorful. While the gold earrings that Khampa women wear may have cost them a year or maybe several year's of their salary, ornaments carry so much social status in their society that probably didn't have to think twice about the purchase. To the Khampa people these ornaments have the utmost sentimental value and significance, because they are the physical remnants of generations of their ancestors hard work or success. what these people are wearing is not just their life savings, but also their family history and treasure. this culture has been around for millenia - archeological finds from the 1st century AD in the khampa area unearthed ornaments that are essentially the same in design and materials as today's are. there are also beliefs that the stones provide good luck and protection to disease. dyed red coral is the most sought after stone, but interestingly tibet is very very far from any oceans - all the coral is imported by traders! Religious symbols from Tibetan Buddhism frequency form the designs of pieces, however archeological finds show that the role of ornaments in Tibetan society and peoples' lives long predate the arrival of Buddhism in Tibet. Indeed the beliefs of spiritual protection being provided by coral, amber and turquoise probably originate from the ancient shamanic Bon religion.

horse race decorations
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