NATIONAL FLOORING COMPANY - FLOORING COMPANY

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National Flooring Company


national flooring company
    flooring company
  • A lender that specializes in financing inventory stock for retailers. Typically retailers pay interest only for several months or until an instrument is sold, then payoff the remaining balance.
    national
  • Of or relating to a nation; common to or characteristic of a whole nation
  • a person who owes allegiance to that nation; "a monarch has a duty to his subjects"
  • limited to or in the interests of a particular nation; "national interests"; "isolationism is a strictly national policy"
  • of or relating to or belonging to a nation or country; "national hero"; "national anthem"; "a national landmark"
  • Owned, controlled, or financially supported by the federal government

Manhattan Company Building
Manhattan Company Building
Financial District, Manhattan, New York City, New York, United States The Manhattan Company Building, planned as thetallest building in the world, was constructed in 1929-30.When the project was announced in April 1929, theManhattan Company, located at 40 Wall Street, had recentlyjoined in the scheme and was to be a primary tenant.Architect H. Craig Severance, associate architect YasuoMatsui, and consulting architects Shreve & Lamb were allspecialists in commercial building and skyscraper design.Starrett Brothers & Eken, one of the major constructionfirms in New York, was the builder, while Moran & Proctor, preeminent foundation specialists, acted as consulting engineer. Although the building's engineering andconstruction were extraordinarily complex, the 71-story,927-foot-tall skyscraper was completed in a year (anunprecedented feat for such a project), and ready foroccupancy in May 1930. An intense rivalry developedbetween the Manhattan Company Building as it rose and theChrysler Building, with the latter eventually winning thebattle of height. The limestone-clad base of the steel-framed Manhattan Company Building occupies almost its entire L-shaped lot and rises through a midsection with a series ofsetbacks to a tower, clad in buff brick and ornamented with terra cotta, with continuous vertical piers and recessedspandrels. The building is crowned by a pyramidal roofcapped by a spire. While its overall massing is characteristicof Art Deco style skyscrapers in New York of the period,contemporary accounts refer to the building's "modernizedFrench Gothic" detailing, though it incorporates classical andabstract geometric elements as well. Visually, the ManhattanCompany Building is still an imposing presence on the lowerManhattan skyline. The Manhattan Company, organized in 1799 for the purpose of furnishing the city with pure water,established the Bank of the Manhattan Company that same year, and obtained title to a site at 40 Wall Street.After the Bank merged with Chase National Bank in 1955 to form Chase Manhattan Bank, and a newheadquarters was constructed across Pine Street in 1960, the base of the Manhattan Company Building wasoccupied by Manufacturers Hanover Trust Co. as its downtown headquarters for thirty years. DESCRIPTION AND ANALYSIS George L. Ohrstrom and the 40 Wall Street Corp. The Manhattan Company Building was built by the 40 Wall St. Corp., an investment syndicate headed by Wall Street financier George Lewis Ohrstrom and the Starrett Corp. Planned at the peak of the intense speculative real estate boom in Manhattan of the 1920s that accompanied post-war prosperity, it was intended to be the tallest building in the world. Ohrstrom (1894-1955), born and educated in Michigan, began his career in investment banking in Chicago and was employed with the New York securities firm of P.W. Chapman & Co. from 1919 to 1926, specializing in the financing of private water companies. In 1926 he formed his own firm, G.L. Ohrstrom & Co., which became involved in organizing and financing public utilities, as well as in real estate development. Ohrstrom served as president of the firm and was also a director of several corporations, including the 40 Wall Street Corp. Fortune characterized Ohrstrom in 1930 as "one of the youngest investment bankers concerned with skyscraper construction, [who] finances all the Starrett brothers projects, and is himself one of the founders of the Starrett Investing Corporation. His piece de resistance thus far has been the shrewd and able financing of the Manhattan Company Building." The project represented a total investment of twenty-four million dollars. Starrett Corp. and Starrett Brothers & Eken The Starrett Corp., formed in 1929, consisted of several subsidiary divisions, including construction (Starrett Brothers & Eken), as well as realty and investment. Starrett Brothers, one of New York City's major construction companies responsible for numerous large-scale projects including some of the world's tallest skyscrapers, was formed in 1922 by Paul and William Starrett with Andrew J. Eken. The Starretts were two of five brothers, all of whom were associated with leading construction and architectural firms based in New York and Chicago. Originally from Kansas, the Starrett family moved to the Chicago area; the elder brothers Theodore and Paul began their careers in 1887 in the office of architect Daniel H. Burnham. Theodore (1865-1917) became a structural engineer, a prominent designer of Chicago hotels and apartment buildings, and formed the Whitney-Starrett Co. The subsequent Thompson-Starrett Construction Co., founded in 1901 by Theodore with brothers Ralph and William (and later Goldwin), specialized in large-scale industrial, commercial, hotel, and skyscraper construction. Paul Starrett (1866-1957), while working for Burnham, supervised construction of the Ellicott Square Building, Buffalo (1895-9
Manhattan Company Building (40 Wall Street)
Manhattan Company Building (40 Wall Street)
Manhattan, New York City, New York, United States The Manhattan Company Building, planned as the tallest building in the world, was constructed in 1929-30. When the project was announced in April 1929, the Manhattan Company, located at 40 Wall Street, had recently joined in the scheme and was to be a primary tenant. Architect H. Craig Severance, associate architect Yasuo Matsui, and consulting architects Shreve & Lamb were allspecialists in commercial building and skyscraper design.Starrett Brothers & Eken, one of the major constructionfirms in New York, was the builder, while Moran & Proctor, preeminent foundation specialists, acted as consulting engineer. Although the building's engineering and construction were extraordinarily complex, the 71-story,927-foot-tall skyscraper was completed in a year (anunprecedented feat for such a project), and ready foroccupancy in May 1930. An intense rivalry developedbetween the Manhattan Company Building as it rose and theChrysler Building, with the latter eventually winning thebattle of height. The limestone-clad base of the steel-framed Manhattan Company Building occupies almost its entire L-shaped lot and rises through a midsection with a series ofsetbacks to a tower, clad in buff brick and ornamented with terra cotta, with continuous vertical piers and recessedspandrels. The building is crowned by a pyramidal roofcapped by a spire. While its overall massing is characteristicof Art Deco style skyscrapers in New York of the period,contemporary accounts refer to the building's "modernizedFrench Gothic" detailing, though it incorporates classical andabstract geometric elements as well. Visually, the ManhattanCompany Building is still an imposing presence on the lowerManhattan skyline. The Manhattan Company, organized in 1799 for the purpose of furnishing the city with pure water,established the Bank of the Manhattan Company that same year, and obtained title to a site at 40 Wall Street.After the Bank merged with Chase National Bank in 1955 to form Chase Manhattan Bank, and a newheadquarters was constructed across Pine Street in 1960, the base of the Manhattan Company Building wasoccupied by Manufacturers Hanover Trust Co. as its downtown headquarters for thirty years. DESCRIPTION AND ANALYSIS George L. Ohrstrom and the 40 Wall Street Corp. The Manhattan Company Building was built by the 40 Wall St. Corp., an investment syndicate headed by Wall Street financier George Lewis Ohrstrom and the Starrett Corp. Planned at the peak of the intense speculative real estate boom in Manhattan of the 1920s that accompanied post-war prosperity, it was intended to be the tallest building in the world. Ohrstrom (1894-1955), born and educated in Michigan, began his career in investment banking in Chicago and was employed with the New York securities firm of P.W. Chapman & Co. from 1919 to 1926, specializing in the financing of private water companies. In 1926 he formed his own firm, G.L. Ohrstrom & Co., which became involved in organizing and financing public utilities, as well as in real estate development. Ohrstrom served as president of the firm and was also a director of several corporations, including the 40 Wall Street Corp. Fortune characterized Ohrstrom in 1930 as "one of the youngest investment bankers concerned with skyscraper construction, [who] finances all the Starrett brothers projects, and is himself one of the founders of the Starrett Investing Corporation. His piece de resistance thus far has been the shrewd and able financing of the Manhattan Company Building." The project represented a total investment of twenty-four million dollars. Starrett Corp. and Starrett Brothers & Eken The Starrett Corp., formed in 1929, consisted of several subsidiary divisions, including construction (Starrett Brothers & Eken), as well as realty and investment. Starrett Brothers, one of New York City's major construction companies responsible for numerous large-scale projects including some of the world's tallest skyscrapers, was formed in 1922 by Paul and William Starrett with Andrew J. Eken. The Starretts were two of five brothers, all of whom were associated with leading construction and architectural firms based in New York and Chicago. Originally from Kansas, the Starrett family moved to the Chicago area; the elder brothers Theodore and Paul began their careers in 1887 in the office of architect Daniel H. Burnham. Theodore (1865-1917) became a structural engineer, a prominent designer of Chicago hotels and apartment buildings, and formed the Whitney-Starrett Co. The subsequent Thompson-Starrett Construction Co., founded in 1901 by Theodore with brothers Ralph and William (and later Goldwin), specialized in large-scale industrial, commercial, hotel, and skyscraper construction. Paul Starrett (1866-1957), while working for Burnham, supervised construction of the Ellicott Square Building, Buffalo (1895-96). He joined

national flooring company
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