Welcome to Ironton

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    The Ironton City Council would appreciate more feedback on the option of going to curbside recycling instead

     of using this drop off site.  It would cost anywhere from $2.50-$3.50 per month and you would receive a 60

     gallon cart that would be picked up every other Monday.  We want to you know that this is an all or nothing

     deal.  Since we are organized collection, either everyone gets curbside, or no one does.  The Council is

     planning on making the decision at the May 3, 2017 Council meeting and your feedback and attendance is

     key.  Please mark your calendars and attend to voice your opinion.

    Posted Mar 27, 2017, 1:20 PM by amy@cityofironton.org
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Welcome to Historic Ironton
Established: 1911

The first decade of the 20th Century recorded the discovery of high grade iron ore in eastern Crow Wing County, particularly on the Hans Mattson farmstead. The mining location of Ironton was established on that site to service the Armour and Bonne Belle mines. Many new villages with industry related names such as Orelands, Klondike, Steeleton, Iron Hub and Manganese appeared, and disappeared. Ironton has survived to this day to provide a new appreciation of mining in the "old days".

Ironton was a compact city of two square miles consisting of a once vibrant business district, Prairie inspired architecture, and an underground iron ore mine. P.J. Long can be credited with the auspicious beginnings of Ironton. Long, a native of Georgia, made his fortune in Wisconsin logging, then turned to real estate development in the iron ore boom town of Ironton, the Deadwood of the twentieth century. Mr. Long served two terms in the Minnesota House of Representatives. The Long name is prominent as a leader in the construction of the now historic Ironton City Hall. Ironton boasts a second National Register building: The Spina Hotel. To add to the area's industrial legacy, the Ironton Sintering Plant of the 1920's was also placed on the National Register.
Ironton welcomed a variety of newly arrived European immigrants seeking work and a new home in America.  The Balkan descendants of those immigrants still think of Ironton as "home".  Jim Malosky, UMD Footbal Legend, was one such descendant.  State of Minnesota Attorney General during the Orville Freeman administration and Minnesota Supreme Court Judge Miles Lord calls Ironton home.
As Ironton enters the 21st century, the city is proud to welcome the thousands of visitors coming to play in our "back yard" - The Cuyuna State Recreation Area.



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