Christopher Warwick  


Countertenor

christopherjohnwarwick@gmail.com

+64 (0)21 142 7077

I began singing as a treble at St Paul’s Cathedral in Dunedin.  After moving to Wellington some years later, I began private vocal tuition and shortly thereafter (1993) was accepted into the Wellington Cathedral of St Paul Choir under director Philip Walsh, where I remained until 2003.  I was one of the first eight lay clerks appointed at the Cathedral under succeeding director Andrew Cantrill.   Whilst based in London, England (2006-09), I was a lay clerk of the Chapel Choir at the Royal Hospital, Chelsea, and performed with specialist Renaissance male voice ensemble, Musica Contexta.  I hold a Licentiate certificate (distinction) from Trinity College in London. Currently I am a lay clerk at Christchurch Cathedral, New Zealand and a member of Voices New Zealand Chamber Choir.

As a soloist I have performed Monteverdi's Vespro della Beata Vergine (1610), Tavener's Lament for Jerusalem, and Bach’s Mass in B Minor with the Orpheus Choir; the role of Priest in the Victoria University (Wellington) opera production of Semele by John Eccles; Pergolesi's Stabat Mater, Vivaldi's Nisi Dominus and Stabat Mater, Purcell’s Arise, my muse and Bach’s Cantata 161 with St Paul’s Baroque Orchestra; Vaughan Williams’ Mass in G Minor and Handel’s Messiah with Cantoris; Vivaldi’s Gloria with the NGC Sinfonia and Choir of Wellington Cathedral; Bach’s St John Passion with the New Zealand Baroque Soloists; Handel’s Chandos Anthems VII and XI with The Tudor Consort; Bach’s St Matthew Passion with the Reading Bach Choir and also the Napier Civic Choir; works by Daan Manneke in Amsterdam; and Biber’s Requiem in F minor with the Bartholomew Consort.  In addition to these specific roles, I have performed a wide range of solo and small ensemble repertoire with Baroque Voices and Academia Sanctae Mariae, Wellington Cathedral Choir, Voices New Zealand, Tudor Consort, the Chapel Choir of the Royal Hospital Chelsea, Musica Contexta and The Renaissance Singers.