Security Studies


Alphabetical List of Experts on Security Studies

David Armor
Areas of Expertise:
Social policy, Education, Civil rights, Military manpower
Background:
Dr. Armor is a Professor of Public Policy in the School of Public Policy at George Mason University, Fairfax, Virginia, where he teaches graduate courses in multivariate statistics, culture and policy, social theory and policy, and program evaluation.  He received his B.A. in Mathematics and Sociology from UC Berkeley and his Ph.D. in Sociology from Harvard University, where he also served on the faculty as Assistant and Associate Professor from 1965 to 1972.  Following a Visiting Professorship at UCLA from 1972 to 1973, Dr. Armor joined the Rand Corporation as a Senior Social Scientist.  He was a candidate for Congress in 1982, and in 1985 he was elected to the Los Angeles Board of Education. From 1986 to 1989 Dr. Armor was Principal Deputy and Acting Assistant Secretary of Defense for Force Management and Personnel.  He has conducted research and written widely in the general area of social policy, with special emphasis on education, civil rights and military manpower issues.  Between 1999 and 2005 he served on several National Academy of Science committees studying various issues in military recruiting.  He is a recognized national expert in school desegregation, testifying in numerous federal court cases. Publications include Alcoholism and Treatment (Wiley, 1978); Forced Justice: School Desegregation and the Law (Oxford, 1995); Competition in Education (Pioneer Institute, 1997); School Desegregation in the 21st Century (Praeger, 2002); Maximizing Intelligence (Transaction Publishers, 2003); Contributor, Attitudes, Aspirations, and Aptitudes of American Youth (National Academy Press, 2003); “War, Politics, and the Religion Divide,” (Christian Leadership Ministries Conference, June 2006); “Can NCLB Close Achievement Gaps?” in No Child Left Behind (Routledge, 2008); “Changing Minority Representation in the U.S. Military” (Armed Forces & Society); “After Seattle: In Search of Narrowly Tailored Desegregation Plans” (Teachers College Record, 2010).. 
Contact Information:
E-mail: darmor@gmu.edu
Phone: (703) 993-2260
Website: George Mason University Faculty Page
Kevin Cooney
Areas of Expertise:
Terrorism, Security, Strategic Military Issues, Development, Globalization, International Economic Issues, Japanese Politics, China, and East Asian foreign and security policy.
Background:
Kevin Cooney is the Director of the Pacific Rim Center at Northwest University, where he holds a dual appointment as both professor of Business and Political Science.  He is the author of numerous scholarly articles and three books on Asian policy issues; the latest being Japanese Foreign Policy Since 1945 (M.E. Sharpe, 2007) and The Rise of China and International Security:  America and Asia Respond (Routledge, 2009).  His primary areas of research are in Asian security, terrorism, and the interface of globalization and economic development.  He has often provided television and print commentary for various global media outlets on Asian politics including but not limited to ABC-TV, VOA, Asia Times, and Jornal do Brasil
SpeakingProfessor Cooney is available to lecture on topics related to his areas of expertise. Possible talks include:
"The Political Implications of Global Religious Shifts"
"China's Rise in Perspective"
"Economic and Security Issues Surrounding the Opening of the Arctic"
Contact Information:
E-mail: kevin.cooney@northwestu.edu
Phone: (425) 889-5344
Website: Northwest University Faculty Page
Thomas Copeland
Areas of Expertise:
International politics, national security, terrorism, intelligence
Background:
Thomas Copeland is an Associate Professor of Political Science at Geneva College in Beaver Falls, PA.  He received his Ph.D. in Public and International Affairs from the University of Pittsburgh. He was a 2010 Fellow with the Foundation for the Defense of Democracy. Copeland is the editor of Drawing a Line in the Sea: The 2010 Gaza Flotilla Incident and the Israeli-Palestinian Conflict (Lexington Books, 2011); author of Fool Me Twice: Intelligence Failure and Mass Casualty Terrorism (Martinus Nijhoff, 2007); editor of The Information Revolution and National Security (U.S. Army War College, 1999); and author of “Is the ‘New Terrorism’ Really New?” in the Journal of Conflict Studies, Winter 1999/2000
Contact Information:
E-mail: tecopela@geneva.edu
Phone: (724) 847-6621
Website: Geneva College Faculty Page
Peter D. Feaver
Areas of Expertise:
American foreign policy, the politics of American national security, civil-military relations, the policymaking process
Background:
Peter D. Feaver (Ph.D., Harvard, 1990) is a Professor of Political Science and Public Policy at Duke University. He is Director of the Triangle Institute for Security Studies (TISS) and also Director of the Duke Program in American Grand Strategy (AGS). Feaver is author of Armed Servants: Agency, Oversight, and Civil-Military Relations (Harvard Press, 2003) and of Guarding the Guardians: Civilian Control of Nuclear Weapons in the United States (Cornell University Press, 1992). He is co-author: with Christopher Gelpi and Jason Reifler, of Paying the Human Costs of War (Princeton University Press, 2009); with Susan Wasiolek and Anne Crossman, of Getting the Most Out of College(Ten Speed Press, 2008); and with Christopher Gelpi, of Choosing Your Battles: American Civil-Military Relations and the Use of Force(Princeton University Press, 2004). He is co-editor, with Richard H. Kohn, of Soldiers and Civilians: The Civil-Military Gap and American National Security (MIT Press, 2001).  He has published numerous other monographs, scholarly articles, book chapters, and policy pieces on American foreign policy, public opinion, nuclear proliferation, civil-military relations, information warfare, and U.S. national security.  From June 2005 to July 2007, Feaver was on leave to be Special Advisor for Strategic Planning and Institutional Reform on the National Security Council Staff at the White House where his responsibilities included the national security strategy, regional strategy reviews, and other political-military issues. In 1993-94, Feaver served as Director for Defense Policy and Arms Control on the National Security Council at the White House where his responsibilities included the national security strategy review, counterproliferation policy, regional nuclear arms control, and other defense policy issues.  He is a member of the Aspen Strategy Group, blogs at shadow.foreignpolicy.com, and is a Contributing Editor to Foreign Policy magazine.
SpeakingProfessor Feaver is available to lecture on topics related to his areas of expertise. Possible talks include:
"American Grand Strategy from Bush to Clinton to Bush to Obama"
"Civil-Military Relations and Surge Decisions: Iraq and Afghanistan"
"Getting the Best Out of College"
Contact Information:
E-mail: pfeaver@duke.edu
Phone: (919) 660-4331
Website: Duke Faculty Page

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