Experts Directory

The following experts are Christian political scientists who do research on a variety of topics.  We all are convinced that the Christian faith is relevant to politics, but we recognize that believers can differ with respect to how Christianity should inform matters of public concern.  The purpose of this list is to provide a resource for members of the media or others who are looking for an informed Christian perspective on proposed legislation, judicial decisions, international crises, etc.  Many experts are also available to provide public lectures. Please note that the following categories are quite broad.  More narrow specialties may be found by finding within this page (e.g. for "First Amendment," "Terrorism," etc.), or by clicking on category titles and viewing experts only within that category.

The views expressed by the following experts may not reflect the views of other members of Christians in Political Science nor do they represent an official position of the organization.

Experts by Category of Expertise
Jerold L. Waltman
J. Daryl Charles
Neal Coates
Thomas Heilke
Eric Patterson
Joseph Eugene Yi

Alphabetical List of Experts

David Armor
Areas of Expertise:
Social policy, Education, Civil rights, Military manpower
Background:
Dr. Armor is a Professor of Public Policy in the School of Public Policy at George Mason University, Fairfax, Virginia, where he continues to advise students and do research and writing in his areas of expertise. He received his B.A. in Mathematics and Sociology from UC Berkeley and his Ph.D. in Sociology from Harvard University, where he also served on the faculty as Assistant and Associate Professor from 1965 to 1972.  Following a Visiting Professorship at UCLA from 1972 to 1973, Dr. Armor joined the Rand Corporation as a Senior Social Scientist.  He was a candidate for Congress in 1982, and in 1985 he was elected to the Los Angeles Board of Education. From 1986 to 1989 Dr. Armor was Principal Deputy and Acting Assistant Secretary of Defense for Force Management and Personnel.  He has conducted research and written widely in the general area of social policy, with special emphasis on education, civil rights and military manpower issues.  Between 1999 and 2005 he served on several National Academy of Science committees studying various issues in military recruiting.  He is a recognized national expert in school desegregation, testifying in numerous federal court cases. Publications include Alcoholism and Treatment (Wiley, 1978); Forced Justice: School Desegregation and the Law (Oxford, 1995); Competition in Education (Pioneer Institute, 1997); School Desegregation in the 21st Century (Praeger, 2002); Maximizing Intelligence (Transaction Publishers, 2003); Contributor, Attitudes, Aspirations, and Aptitudes of American Youth (National Academy Press, 2003); “War, Politics, and the Religion Divide,” (Christian Leadership Ministries Conference, June 2006); “Can NCLB Close Achievement Gaps?” in No Child Left Behind (Routledge, 2008); “Changing Minority Representation in the U.S. Military” (Armed Forces & Society); “After Seattle: In Search of Narrowly Tailored Desegregation Plans” (Teachers College Record, 2010), and "Restoring a True Safety Net" (National Affairs, 2012).
 
Contact Information:
E-mail: darmor@gmu.edu
Phone: (703) 993-2260)
Website: George Mason University Faculty Page
Stephen Baskerville
Areas of Expertise:
International politics with a special focus on family and social policy, gender politics, political theory, religion and politics.
Background:
Dr. Baskerville is a Professor of Government at Patrick Henry College in Purcellville, Virginia, where he teaches courses in international relations, comparative politics, and political theory.  He is also Research Fellow at the Howard Center for Family, Religion, and Society, the Independent Institute, the Inter-American Institute, and was recently a Fulbright scholar at the Russian State University for the Humanities. He received his B.A. in International Relations and Political Science from The American University School of International Service and School of Government and his Ph.D. in Government from the London School of Economics.  He has taught politics and international affairs at Howard University (1987-1992 and 1997-2005) and Palacky University in Olomouc, Czech Republic (1992-1997).  He has written on the history of political ideas with a focus on religion and politics, especially in Not Peace but a Sword:  The Political Theology of the English Revolution (Routledge, 1993).  He now writes mostly on the politics of the family and sexuality, most notably in Taken Into Custody: The War Against Fathers, Marriage, and the Family (Cumberland House, 2007).  He served as the President of the American Coalition for Fathers and Children (2005-2007), is currently a Fulbright scholar at the Russian State University for the Humanities, and serves as managing editor for the International Journal for Religious Freedom.  He is now working on a book on sexual politics in international perspective.  In addition to scholarly writings, he writes frequently for current affairs publications and appears in the media
Contact Information:
E-mail:  skbaskerville@phc.edu
Phone:  (202) 758-7238
Website: Patrick Henry College Faculty Page
Amy E. Black
Areas of Expertise:
American Politics, Congress, Religion and Politics
Background:
Amy E. Black is associate professor of Political Science and chair of the Department of Politics & International Relations at Wheaton College (IL). A graduate of Claremont McKenna College, Dr. Black earned her Ph.D. in Political Science at M.I.T.  In 2000-2001, Dr. Black served as an American Political Science Association Congressional Fellow, working in the office of Representative Melissa A. Hart (PA-04). Her most recent book is a Honoring God in Red or Blue: Approaching Politics with Humility, Grace, and Reason (Moody, 2012). Her other books include textbook, Religion and American Politics: Classic and Contemporary Perspectives, edited with Douglas Koopman and Larycia Hawkins (Pearson Longman, 2011). Her other publications include Beyond Left and Right: Helping Christians Make Sense of American Politics (Baker Books, 2008), From Inspiration to Legislation:  How an Idea Becomes a Law (Prentice Hall, 2007), and, with Douglas Koopman and David Ryden, Of Little Faith: The Politics of George W. Bush’s Faith Based Initiatives (Georgetown, 2004).
Contact Information:
E-mail: amy.e.black@wheaton.edu
Phone: (630) 752-5980
Website: Wheaton College Faculty Page
J. Daryl Charles
Areas of Expertise:
The natural law, the just war tradition, religion and culture, religion and politics, bioethics, evangelicalism, Christian social ethics
Background:
Dr. J. Daryl Charles is Director and Senior Fellow of the Bryan Institute for Critical Thought & Practice. He is author, co-author, or co-editor of thirteen books, including (with David D. Corey) The Just War Tradition Reconsidered (forthcoming), (with DavidB. Capes) Thriving in Babylon (2010), (with Timothy J. Demy) War, Peace, and Christianity (2010), Retrieving the Natural Law: A Return to Moral First Things (2008),and Between Pacifism and Jihad: Just War and Christian Tradition (2005). Charles served as the 2007-2008 William E. Simon Visiting Fellow in Religion & Public Life at the James Madison Program in American Ideals and Institutions, Princeton University. Before entering the classroom, Charles did public-policy research in the realm of criminal justice. His work has been published in a wide array of both scholarly and  popular journals, including the Journal of Religious Ethics, Christian Scholars ReviewFirst Things, Books & Culture, National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly, Philosophia Christi, Ethics & Medicine, Pro Ecclesia, and the Journal of Church and State.
Contact Information:
E-mail: daryl.charles@bryan.edu
Phone: (423) 775-7265
Website: Bryan College Faculty Page
H. Lee Cheek, Jr.
Areas of Expertise:
American politics, Political theory, Southern politics, Methodism
Background:
Dr. H. Lee Cheek, Jr., is Associate Vice President for Academic Affairs and Professor of Political Science at Athens State University in Athens, Alabama.  He received his bachelor's degree from Western Carolina University, his M.Div. from Duke University, his M.P.A. from Western Carolina University, and his Ph.D. from The Catholic University of America.  He has also been a congressional aide and a political consultant.  Dr. Cheek's books include Political Philosophy and Cultural Renewal (Transaction/Rutgers, 2001, with Kathy B. Cheek); Calhoun and Popular Rule, published by the University of Missouri Press (2001; paper edition, 2004); Calhoun: Selected Speeches and Writings (Regnery, 2003); Order and Legitimacy (Transaction/Rutgers, 2004); an edition of Calhoun's A Disquisition on Government (St. Augustine's, 2007); a critical edition of W. H. Mallock's The Limits of Pure Democracy (Transaction/Rutgers, 2007); a monograph on Wesleyan theology (Wesley Studies Society, 2010); and an edition of the classic study, A Theory of Public Opinion (Transaction/Rutgers, 2011).  He has also published dozens of scholarly articles in publications like the Journal of Politics, Methodist  History, International Social Science Review, Hebraic Political Studies, and is a regular commentator on American politics.  Dr. Cheek’s current research includes completing an intellectual biography of Francis Graham Wilson (I.S.I. Books), a study of the American Founding, and a book on Patrick Henry's constitutionalism and political theory.  Cheek is also an ordained United Methodist minister and former parish minister and U.S. Army chaplain..
Contact Information:
E-mail: lee.cheek@athens.edu
Phone: (256) 233-8114
Website: Personal Website
Neal Coates
Areas of Expertise:
International Relations, State & Local Government.
Background:
Neal Coates is Associate Professor of Political Science and Chairman of the Department of Political Science at Abilene Christian University.  He holds a B.A. in Government from Abilene Christian University, a J.D. from the University of Kansas, and a M.A. and Ph.D. in Political Science from the University of Connecticut. He has experience in local and state law and politics, having served as Staff Attorney for the Texas Department of Insurance in Austin, in the Financial Division and the Legal Compliance Section, and as Assistant City Attorney for the City of College Station, Texas.  Coates has published and presented on a range of topics including evidence in criminal trials, zoning adult bookstores, the Texas Torts Claims Act, administrative penalties in Texas insurance law, Texas and the death penalty, and the forms of execution allowed under the Eighth Amendment.  His writings also include various aspects of the United Nations Law of the Sea Convention, the Bush Doctrine, and U.S. foreign policy in East Africa.  In addition, he has three publications dealing with the topic of e-government, in Texas, China, and Zambia.  Coates is currently at work on articles regarding the present-day situation for Christians in the Middle East and the historical recognition of the United States by France and Morocco.
SpeakingProfessor Coates is available to lecture on topics related to his areas of expertise. Possible talks include:
"Texas and its Unique Place in the Politics of the United States of America”
“The Death Penalty in Texas and the United States”
“International Rules for the Oceans Pursuant to the United Nations Law of the Sea Convention”
“Should the U.S. Join the UN Law of the Sea Treaty”
“E-government Around the World”
Contact Information:
E-mail: coates@pols.acu.edu
Phone:  (325) 674-2917    
Website: Abilene Christian University Faculty Page
Kimberly H. Conger
Areas of Expertise:
American Politics, Religion and Politics, State and Local Government
Background:
Kimberly H. Conger is a Lecturer in the Department of Political Science at Colorado State University.  She received her PhD from Ohio State University and taught at Iowa State University for several years before moving to CSU.  Professor Conger studies religion and politics, political activism, and state politics.  Her research has been published in Perspectives on PoliticsParty PoliticsState Politics and Policy Quarterly, and Political Psychology.  Her recent book, The Christian Right in Republican State Politics (Palgrave, 2009), examines the political goals and strategies of the state-level conservative Evangelical activists.  She has been quoted in numerous national and international news outlets  including NPR, The Kansas City Star, and the Times of India.  Professor Conger is currently at work on a book about religiously motivated activism - on both the right and the left - in the 2008 election.
Contact Information:
E-mail: kimberly.conger@colostate.edu
Phone: (303) 523-4721
Website: Colorado State University Faculty Page
Kevin Cooney
Areas of Expertise:
Terrorism, Security, Strategic Military Issues, Development, Globalization, International Economic Issues, Japanese Politics, China, and East Asian foreign and security policy.
Background:
Kevin Cooney is the Director of the Pacific Rim Center at Northwest University, where he holds a dual appointment as both professor of Business and Political Science.  He is the author of numerous scholarly articles and three books on Asian policy issues; the latest being Japanese Foreign Policy Since 1945 (M.E. Sharpe, 2007) and The Rise of China and International Security:  America and Asia Respond (Routledge, 2009).  His primary areas of research are in Asian security, terrorism, and the interface of globalization and economic development.  He has often provided television and print commentary for various global media outlets on Asian politics including but not limited to ABC-TV, VOA, Asia Times, and Jornal do Brasil
SpeakingProfessor Cooney is available to lecture on topics related to his areas of expertise. Possible talks include:
"The Political Implications of Global Religious Shifts"
"China's Rise in Perspective"
"Economic and Security Issues Surrounding the Opening of the Arctic"
Contact Information:
E-mail: kevin.cooney@northwestu.edu
Phone: (425) 889-5344
Website: Northwest University Faculty Page
Thomas Copeland
Areas of Expertise:
International politics, national security, terrorism, intelligence
Background:
Thomas Copeland is an Associate Professor of Political Science at Geneva College in Beaver Falls, PA.  He received his Ph.D. in Public and International Affairs from the University of Pittsburgh. He was a 2010 Fellow with the Foundation for the Defense of Democracy. Copeland is the editor of Drawing a Line in the Sea: The 2010 Gaza Flotilla Incident and the Israeli-Palestinian Conflict (Lexington Books, 2011); author of Fool Me Twice: Intelligence Failure and Mass Casualty Terrorism (Martinus Nijhoff, 2007); editor of The Information Revolution and National Security (U.S. Army War College, 1999); and author of “Is the ‘New Terrorism’ Really New?” in the Journal of Conflict Studies, Winter 1999/2000
Contact Information:
E-mail: tecopela@geneva.edu
Phone: (724) 847-6621
Website: Geneva College Faculty Page
Leah Farish
Areas of Expertise:
Western Sahara and Western North Africa, civil rights, American Muslim civil liberties issues, First Amendment, America's founding and Christian heritage.
Background:
Leah Farish has been a litigator in the area of civil rights and religious civil liberties for over 25 years.  Her work on noted cases that have come before the U.S. Supreme Court includes a variety of trial and appellate representation in Paula Corbin Jones v. William Jefferson Clinton, Dubbs v. Head Start, Falvo v. Owasso (both student privacy cases), and Green v. Haskell County (Ten Commandments monument case).  In Hearn v. Muskogee Public Schools she was lead counsel on behalf of the Muslim child who wanted to wear her headscarf to school, a case which Attorney General Ashcroft certified as a case of national importance and for which both Farish won the Marshall-Brennan Constitutional Law Project's award for courageously defending student rights in 2005.  Ms. Farish has published three books for young people on constitutional issues, and numerous articles and commentary in such outlets as Current Municipal Problems, WorldNetDaily.com, Journal of Religion and Society, ImpunityWatch.com, and Puritan Reformed Journal.  Currently she is most often asked to speak on the topic of Western Sahara but has also been interviewed on civil rights issues on CNN, Law Enforcement Television Network, America's Voice, and Family News in Focus.
Ms. Farish was educated at Duke University, graduating magna cum laude in both English and Comparative Literature, with a Master's degree in English from Vanderbilt.  Her JD is from Baylor University. A member of INPROL (International Network to Promote the Rule of Law), an Honor Guard attorney with the Alliance Defense Fund, and an allied attorney with the Rutherford Institute, she has also helped to lead or organize seminars on ethics and human rights issues in Latvia, Russia, Morocco, and at the National Press Club in Washington, DC.
She has also served as an adjunct professor at Oklahoma colleges and universities for over 10 years in the areas of Constitutional law, school law, and criminal procedure for 10 years.
Contact Information
Peter D. Feaver
Areas of Expertise:
American foreign policy, the politics of American national security, civil-military relations, the policymaking process
Background:
Peter D. Feaver (Ph.D., Harvard, 1990) is a Professor of Political Science and Public Policy at Duke University. He is Director of the Triangle Institute for Security Studies (TISS) and also Director of the Duke Program in American Grand Strategy (AGS). Feaver is author of Armed Servants: Agency, Oversight, and Civil-Military Relations (Harvard Press, 2003) and of Guarding the Guardians: Civilian Control of Nuclear Weapons in the United States (Cornell University Press, 1992). He is co-author: with Christopher Gelpi and Jason Reifler, of Paying the Human Costs of War (Princeton University Press, 2009); with Susan Wasiolek and Anne Crossman, of Getting the Most Out of College (Ten Speed Press, 2008); and with Christopher Gelpi, of Choosing Your Battles: American Civil-Military Relations and the Use of Force (Princeton University Press, 2004). He is co-editor, with Richard H. Kohn, of Soldiers and Civilians: The Civil-Military Gap and American National Security (MIT Press, 2001).  He has published numerous other monographs, scholarly articles, book chapters, and policy pieces on American foreign policy, public opinion, nuclear proliferation, civil-military relations, information warfare, and U.S. national security.  From June 2005 to July 2007, Feaver was on leave to be Special Advisor for Strategic Planning and Institutional Reform on the National Security Council Staff at the White House where his responsibilities included the national security strategy, regional strategy reviews, and other political-military issues. In 1993-94, Feaver served as Director for Defense Policy and Arms Control on the National Security Council at the White House where his responsibilities included the national security strategy review, counterproliferation policy, regional nuclear arms control, and other defense policy issues.  He is a member of the Aspen Strategy Group, blogs at shadow.foreignpolicy.com, and is a Contributing Editor to Foreign Policy magazine.
SpeakingProfessor Feaver is available to lecture on topics related to his areas of expertise. Possible talks include:
"American Grand Strategy from Bush to Clinton to Bush to Obama"
"Civil-Military Relations and Surge Decisions: Iraq and Afghanistan"
"Getting the Best Out of College"
Contact Information:
E-mail: pfeaver@duke.edu
Phone: (919) 660-4331
Website: Duke Faculty Page
Robert P. George
Areas of Expertise:
Constitutional law, civil liberties, moral and political philosophy, natural law theory, and law and religion. 
Background:
Robert P. George is McCormick Professor of Jurisprudence and Director of the James Madison Program in American Ideals and Institutions at Princeton University.  He has served on the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights and the President’s Council on Bioethics, and was a Judicial Fellow at the Supreme Court of the United States, where he received the Justice Tom C. Clark Award.  A graduate of Swarthmore College, he holds J.D. and M.T.S. degrees from Harvard University, and a D.Phil. from Oxford University, in addition to many honorary degrees.  He is a member of the Council on Foreign Relations, and a recipient of the U.S. Presidential Citizens Medal and the Honorific Medal of the Republic of Poland for the Defense of Human Rights.  He is the author of Making Men Moral:  Civil Liberties and Public Morality (1995), In Defense of Natural Law (1999), and The Clash of Orthodoxies (2002), and co-author of Embryo: A Defense of Human Life (2008) and Body-Self Dualism in Contemporary Ethics and Politics (2008). 
Contact Information:
E-mail: rgeorge@princeton.edu
Phone: (609) 258-3270
Website: Princeton Faculty Page
Anthony Gill
Areas of Expertise:
Religion and politics, religion and economics, religious liberty/freedom, government regulation of religion, federal/state/local government, secularization, Latin America, Europe.
Background:
Anthony Gill (Ph.D., UCLA 1994) is Professor of Political Science and Adjunct Professor of Sociology at the University of Washington, and non-resident scholar at Baylor University’s Institute for Studies of Religion.  He is also the host of Research on Religion, a weekly podcast series focusing on the social scientific study of religion that takes faith and religiosity seriously.  The podcast series is designed to make scholarly research more broadly accessible to scholars and the public, including clergy, laity, homeschoolers, and anyone else interested in religion.  Gill authored two books – Rending unto Caesar: The Catholic Church and the State in Latin America (Chicago, 1998) and The Political Origins of Religious Liberty (Cambridge, 2007) – and numerous articles on religious liberty, Latin American religion, and Muslims in Europe.  His current research includes a book manuscript on how local governments regulate churches and how that affects religious practice in the United States, as well as research on religious and political attitudes.  Gill also writes extensively on the economics of religion.  In 1999, Prof. Gill received the University of Washington’s Distinguished Teaching Award and has been a highly sought-after speaker around the Puget Sound, including stints as a substitute teacher at homeschooling co-ops.  He was a frequent guest host on the Georgene Rice Show, a Christian talk radio program based out of Portland, Oregon.  Outside of academia, Tony serves as an Assistant Scoutmaster, youth basketball coach, and enjoys camping, outdoor cooking, target shooting, martial arts, and all things cowboy.  His favorite color is blue. 
SpeakingProfessor Gill is available to lecture on topics related to his areas of expertise. Possible talks include:
"Threats to Religious Liberty in the United States."
“Trends in Secularization and Religiosity in the U.S., Europe & Latin America.”
“The Economics of Religion.”
“The Political Origins of Religious Liberty.”
Contact Information:
E-mail: tgil@uw.edu
Phone: (206) 914-3381    
Website: University of Washington Faculty Page
Gary L. Gregg II
Areas of Expertise:
The American presidency, American political thought, modern conservative political thought, and imaginative literature and its relationship to politics.
Background:
Gary L. Gregg II, Ph.D., holds the Mitch McConnell Chair in Leadership at the University of Louisville where he also directs the McConnell Center and the Senator Mitch McConnell and Secretary Elaine L. Chao Archives.  He is the author or editor of nine books including The Presidential Republic: Executive Representation and Deliberative Democracy (1997), Vital Remnants: America's Founding and the Western Tradition (1999), Patriot Sage: George Washington and the American Political Tradition (1999), Thinking about the Presidency (2005), and Securing Democracy: Why We Have an Electoral College, Second Edition (2008).  He is also author of the young adult fantasy series of novels called The Remnant Chronicles, the first two of which have been published as The Sporran and The Iona Conspiracy.  He has appeared on national television and radio programs and is currently working on two books exploring the development and flourishing of the character of George Washington. 
Contact Information:
E-mail: ggregg@louisville.edu
Phone: (502) 852-8811
Website: University of Louisville Faculty Page
Frank Guliuzza III
Areas of Expertise:
Constitutional law (particularly issues related to the First Amendment and equal protection), American politics, the judicial confirmation process, religion and politics, practical politics, and pre-law advising
Background:
Background: Frank Guliuzza (Ph.D., University of Notre Dame, 1990) is the Dean of Academic Affairs and Professor of Government at Patrick Henry College in Purcellville, Virginia. He is the author of Over the Wall: Protecting Religious Expression in the Public Square (SUNY: 2000), Before the Paper Chase: The Scholarship of Law School Preparation and Admissions (Carolina Academic Press: 2012, with Tim Garrison), and has published articles and reviews in a number of journals including The Marquette Law Review, The Drake Law Review, The Willamette Law Review, The Journal of Politics, The Review of Politics, PS, American Political Science Review, and Academe. He has been recognized four times for "Outstanding Teaching in Political Science"  bythe American Political Science Association (2000, 2003, 2004, 2008). In 2003, he was selected by the Council for Advancement and Support of Education & Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching as "Utah Professor of the Year." He was also the recipient of the Congressman Neal Smith Award from the American Mock Trial Association (2008) for his exemplary contribution to law-related education. He is the current President of the American Collegiate Moot Court Association, and is a past President of the Western Association of Pre-Law Advisers and the Pre-Law Advisors’ National Council. Further, he is on the Executive Board of the American Collegiate Moot Court Association, the Executive Committee of the American Mock Trial Association. His mock trial and moot court teams have captured a number of awards included the last four ACMA national championships. He is a licensed minister. In 2000, he was a candidate for the United States Senate, and he is a past Vice Chairman of the Utah Republican Party.
Contact Information:
E-mail: fguliuzza@phc.edu
Phone: (540) 441-8042
Website: Patrick Henry College Faculty Page
Mark David Hall
Areas of Expertise:
The American founding, religion and American politics, and the First Amendment religion clauses.
Background:
Mark David Hall is Herbert Hoover Distinguished Professor of Politics at George Fox University.  He has written or co-edited The Political and Legal Philosophy of James Wilson, 1742-1798 (1997); The Founders on God and Government (2004); Collected Works of James Wilson, 2 vol. (2007); The Forgotten Founders on Religion and Public Life (2009); The Sacred Rights of Conscience: Selected Readings on Religious Liberty and Church-State Relations in the American Founding (2009); America’s Forgotten Founders (2012), and Roger Sherman and the Creation of the American Republic (Oxford University Press, 2013).  He has also written more than fifty journal articles, book chapters, reviews, and sundry pieces.  He is currently co-editing Faith and the Founders of the American Republic (Oxford University Press) and editing Collected Works of Roger Sherman (Liberty Fund Press).  He will serve as president of Christians in Political Science from 2010-2014 and is a member of the Board of Governors of Veritas Christian School.
SpeakingProfessor Hall is available to lecture on topics related to his areas of expertise. Possible talks include:
"Did America Have a Christian Founding?"
"Jeffersonian Walls and Madisonian Lines: The Supreme Court's Use of History and the First Amendment's Religion Clauses"
"The Old Puritan and a New Nation: Roger Sherman and the Creation of the American Republic"
Contact Information:
E-mail: mhall@georgefox.edu
Phone: (503) 554-2674
Website: George Fox University Faculty Page
Thomas Heilke
Areas of Expertise:
International Relations, Political Theory
Background:
Thomas Heilke is Professor of Political Science and Dean of Graduate Studies at the University of Kansas. He earned his B.A. and M.A. from the University of Calgary, and his Ph.D. from Duke University (1990). He is the author of several books, including: Voegelin on the Idea of Race: An Analysis of Modern European Racism (1990); Nietzsche’s Tragic Regime: Culture, Aesthetics, and Political Education (1998); Eric Voegelin: The Quest for Reality (1999). He is also editor or co-editor of several books, and author of numerous of articles and chapters in the areas of political theory, religion and politics, Protestant political thought, and international relations. When his administrative duties allow, he is currently at work on a co-authored book with his colleague, Brent Steele: As for the Gods: Religion in International Politics, under contract in the New Millennium Books in International Studies series at Rowman and Littlefield. He is also working on a book that examines ideas of friendship in the Protestant Reformation, and another that compares the political thought of John Howard Yoder and Reinhold Niebuhr.
SpeakingProfessor Heilke is available to lecture on topics related to his areas of expertise. Possible talks include:
"What is 'Global Religion,' Why Does it Matter, and What Should we Know About It?"
"What is Friendship? Why Does Thinking About Friendship Matter to Thinking About Religion or Politics?"
"How Should Christians Think About Politics?"
"Is it Possible for Christians to Think well about Politics?"
Contact Information:
E-mail: heilke@ku.edu
Phone: (785) 864-6254
Website: University of Kansas Faculty Page
Murray Jardine
Areas of Expertise:
Political Philosophy, Theology, Epistemology, Philosophy of Science, Religion and Culture, Religion and Politics
Background:
Murray Jardine is a Professor of Political Science at Auburn University.  His field is political philosophy.  He completed his Ph.D. at Duke University in 1992.  He has won numerous teaching awards. He has published two books, Speech and Political Practice (SUNY Press, 1998) and The Making and Unmaking of Technological Society (Brazos Press, 2004), and has published articles dealing with philosophical and theological issues related to politics.  His current research is directed toward synthesizing recent work in political philosophy and theology.
SpeakingProfessor Jardine is available to lecture on topics related to his areas of expertise. Possible talks include:
"The Meaning of Freedom"
"Christianity and the Crisis of Modern Technological Societies"
"Christianity and Modern Communications Media"
"Christianity and Science"
Contact Information:
E-mail: jardimu@auburn.edu
Phone: (334) 844-6162
Website: Auburn University Faculty Page
Stephen M. King
Areas of Expertise:
Religion and politics, Administrative ethics, Public management, Educational reform
Background:
Dr. King received his Ph.D. in Political Science from the University of Missouri-Columbia in 1990. He is currently Associate Professor and Coordinator of Public Policy at Southeastern University in Lakeland, Florida. His area of teaching and research interest are in American Government broadly, public policy and policy analysis, public administration and administrative ethics, and education reform policy. Dr. King has taught twenty years in higher education, including eighteen years in Christian higher education. He is the author of God and Caesar: The Biblical Keys to Good Government and Community Action (Xulon Press, 2002) and co-author with Bradley S. Chilton of Administration in the Public Interest: Principles, Policies, and Practices (Carolina Academic Press, 2009). He has published in Administration and Society, Public Administration Review, Public Voices, Public Integrity, Home School Researcher and Faculty Dialogue.  He has contributed entries to the Encyclopedia of Religion and Politics (2002), edited by Paul Djupe and Laura Olson. He has written dozens of papers, policy studies, policy briefs, and newspaper editorials in the areas of Christian faith and politics, religion and politics, administrative ethics, public management, and education reform policy. 
In addition, he has served as Research Vice President for the Public Interest Institute, consulted on matters of online educational research and training for YorktownUniversity.com and the Community Initiative Task Force for Model Christian Organizations, served as a department chair, coordinator, or director of undergraduate and graduate programs in American Government, Public Policy, and Public Administration, worked part-time in city and state government, and was a licensed and ordained minister.
Contact Information:
E-mail: smking@seu.edu
Phone:  (863) 667-5446
Website: Southeastern University Faculty Page
Douglas L. Koopman
Areas of Expertise:
American Politics, Congress
Background:
Dr. Douglas L. Koopman is Professor of Political Science at Calvin College in Grand Rapids, Michigan, teaching in American political institutions and doing research on Congress and religion in American politics.  His most recent book is Religion and American Politics: Classic and Contemporary Perspectives (Pearson, 2010), a reader offering historical and contemporary perspectives on the role of religion in American public life.  He is co-author of Of Little Faith: The Politics of George W. Bush’s Faith Based Initiatives (Georgetown University Press, 2004), and several other works.  His first book was Hostile Takeover: The House Republican Party, 1980-1995 (Rowman and Littlefield, 1996) about the era leading up to the Republican congressional takeover of 1994.  Koopman has been the program director of Calvin College’s Paul B. Henry Institute for the Study of Christianity and Politics, interim director of its Center for Social Research, and the college’s William Spoelhof Teacher-Scholar-in-Residence.  From 1980 to 1995, Koopman worked in both the House and Senate in personal, committee, and leadership staff roles.
Contact Information:
E-mail: dkoopman@calvin.edu
Phone: (616) 526-6706
Website: Calvin College Faculty Page
Stephen V. Monsma
Areas of Expertise:
Religion and politics, Public policy, Welfare, Comparative religion and politics
Background:
Stephen V. Monsma is a research fellow at the Henry Institute for the Study of Christianity and Politics, Calvin College (Grand Rapids, MI) and a professor emeritus of political science at Pepperdine University (Malibu, CA). He is also a non-resident scholar at the Institute for Studies of Religion at Baylor University.  He has published widely in the fields of faith-based nonprofit organizations, church-state relations, and public policy.  Among his most recent works are Pluralismm and Freedom: Faith-Based Organizatons in a Democratic Society (2012) and a second edition of The Challenge of Pluralism: Church and State in Five Democracies (2010), which he co-authored with J. Christopher Soper and was first published in 1997, and Healing for a Broken World: Christian Perspectives on Public Policy (2008). Among his other books are: Faith, Hope and Jobs: Welfare-to-Work in Los Angles (2006) and Putting Faith in Partnerships: Welfare-to-Work in Four Cities (2004).  He has also published articles in such journals as the Journal of Church and State and the Notre Dame Journal of Law, Ethics, and Public Policy.   He is currently working on a book dealing with the religious freedom rights of faith-based human service organizations, entitled Faith-Based Organizations in a Democratic Society: Pluralism and Freedom..
SpeakingProfessor Monsma is available to lecture on topics related to his areas of expertise. Possible talks include:
"Religious Freedom Rights of Faith-Based Organizations: Theory and Practice"
"Church and State in a Democratic Society: Why Christians Should be the First to Defend the Religious Freedom Rights of Jews and Muslims--and Vice Versa"
"Voting as a Christian: What it Means and How to Do It"
Contact Information:
E-mail: sm24@calvin.edu
Phone:  (616) 526-6993
Website: Calvin College Faculty Page
Glenn A. Moots
Areas of Expertise:
Religion and Politics, Reformed Theology, Politics and the Reformation, Colonial/Revolutionary America, John Locke, Civil Religion, Political Theory, Higher Education.
Background:
Glenn A. Moots is Professor of Political Science and Philosophy at Northwood University (Michigan). He is also Director of Northwood’s Forum for Citizenship and Enteprise. He is author of Politics Reformed: The Anglo-American Legacy of Covenant Theology. (University of Missouri Press, 2010). He has also authored articles on various topics (e.g. John Locke, religion and politics in America, democratic theory) in Hebraic Political Studies, Locke Studies, Perspectives on Political Science, Humanitas, Journal of Markets and Morality, Journal of Politics, Eighteenth Century Studies, Anglican & Episcopal History, and The University Bookman. He earned his PhD at Louisiana State University and also has graduate degrees in philosophy and financial economics. He is presently working on a book researching the historical roots of American civil religion.
SpeakingProfessor Moots is available to lecture on topics related to his areas of expertise. Possible talks include:
"Is There Such a Thing as Christian America?"
"Why John Locke Matters"
"Preparation or Playpen? How to go to college"
“Answering the Call: Turning Your Education into a Vocation”
Contact Information:
E-mail: moots@northwood.edu
Phone:  (989) 837-4255  
Website: Northwood University Faculty Page
Brent Nelsen
Areas of Expertise:
European Politics
Background:
Brent Nelsen is a professor of political science at Furman University. He earned his B.A. from Wheaton College (1981) and a Ph.D. (1989) from the University of Wisconsin-Madison.  He has written The State Offshore: Petroleum, Politics, and State Intervention on the British and Norwegian Continental Shelves (1991) and is the editor of Norway and the European Community: The Political Economy of Integration (1993).  More recently Brent teamed up with one of his former students (Alexander Stubb, now foreign minister of Finland) to publish a textbook on the European Union called The European Union: Readings on the Theory and Practice of European Integration (2003), now in its third edition.  Since 2001 Brent has shifted his research interests to the study of religion and politics in Europe. He and his Furman colleague Jim Guth have published several articles on how religion shapes the attitudes of Europeans toward the European Union. The two are currently working on a book entitled Religion and the Struggle for Europe: Catholicism, Protestantism and Politics in the European Union to be published by Georgetown University Press.
SpeakingProfessor Nelsen is available to lecture on topics related to his areas of expertise. Possible talks include:
"Thinking Christianly"
"Does Religion Still Matter?: Religion, Politics, and the European Union".
Contact Information:
E-mail: brent.nelsen@furman.edu 
Phone: (864) 294-3329
Website: Furnam Faculty Page
Eric Patterson
Areas of Expertise:
Religion and international affairs, Religion, war, and peace, The ethics of war/just war theory
Background:
Eric Patterson is Assistant Director at the Berkley Center for Religion, Peace and World Affairs and Visiting Assistant Professor of Government at George Town University. He previously served as White House Fellow at the U.S. Office of Personnel Management and the William C. Foster Fellow Visiting Scholar the U.S. Department of State. 
Contact Information:
E-mail: edp9@georgetown.edu
Phone: (202) 687-2443
Website: Georgetown University Faculty Page
John J. Pitney, Jr.
Areas of Expertise: 
American Politics, Congress
Background:
John J. Pitney, Jr., is the Roy P. Crocker Professor of American Politics at Claremont McKenna College in Claremont, California. He received his B.A. in political science from Union College, where he was co-valedictorian. He earned his Ph.D. in political science at Yale, where he was a National Science Foundation Fellow. From 1978 to 1980, Dr. Pitney worked in the New York State Senate. From 1983 to 1984, as a Congressional Fellow of the American Political Science Association, he worked for Senator Alfonse D’Amato of New York and the House Republican Policy Committee, chaired by Representative Dick Cheney of Wyoming. From 1984 to 1986, he was senior domestic policy analyst for the House Republican Research Committee. He joined the Claremont McKenna College faculty in 1986. From 1989 to 1991, during a leave of absence, he worked at the Research Department of the Republican National Committee, first as deputy director, then as acting director. He has written articles for Politico, The Weekly Standard, The Wall Street Journal, The Christian Science Monitor, and Roll Call, among others. His scholarly works include The Art of Political Warfare, published in 2000 by the University of Oklahoma Press.  With Joseph M. Bessette, he is coauthor of American Government and Politics: Deliberation, Democracy, and Citizenship (Cengage, 2010).
Contact Information:
Phone: (909) 607-4224
Ellis Sandoz
Areas of Expertise:
Political Philosophy
Background:
Ellis Sandoz is the Hermann Moyse, Jr., Distinguished Professor of Political Science at Louisiana State University and Director of the Eric Voegelin Institute for American Renaissance Studies.  He was educated at LSU (B. A., 1951; M. A., 1953), the universities of North Carolina, Georgetown, Heidelberg, and the University of Munich where he completed his doctorate (Dr. oec. publ.) with Eric Voegelin in 1965, the only American to do so.  Professor Sandoz is a specialist in the field of political philosophy (American, European, and Russian), and he approaches problems of public policy from that perspective.  He founded and remains secretary of the Eric Voegelin Society.  He has authored, coauthored, or edited twenty books, including: Republicanism, Religion and the Soul of America (2006); The Politics of Truth and other Untimely Essays: The Crisis of Civic Consciousness (1999); A Government of Laws: Political Theory, Religion and the American Founding 2nd (2001); Political Sermons of the American Founding Era, 1730 to 1805 2 vol. (1998); Eric Voegelin's Significance for the Modern Mind (1991); The Roots of Liberty: Magna Carta, Ancient Constitution, and the Anglo-American Tradition of Rule of Law 2nd (2008); Political Apocalypse: A Study of Dostoevsky’s Grand Inquisitor, 2d ed. rev. (2000); and The Voegelinian Revolution: A Biographical Introduction, 2d ed. rev. (2000).
Contact Information:
E-mail: esandoz@lsu.edu
Phone: (225) 578-2552
Website: Eric Voegelin Institute Director Page
Garrett Ward Sheldon
Areas of Expertise:
Religion and politics, Early American political thought.
Background:
Garrett Ward Sheldon (PhD. Rutgers, 1983) is the John Morton Beaty Professor of Politics at the University of Virginia’s College at Wise.He is the author of ten books on Religion and Politics; Early American Political Thought; and Christianity, including The Political Philosophy of James Madison (Johns Hopkins University Press). He has lectured on American Political Theory and Religion at Oxford, Princeton, Moscow University; the University of Vienna, Austria.  He has spoken at Heritage, AEI, Cato , and other think tanks and foundations. An ordained Christian minister, he is the author of the popular novel What Would Jesus Do? ; an update of his great grandfather, Charles Sheldon’s classic In His Steps. Sheldon won the Outstanding Faculty in Virginia Award and has advised the White House during President George W. Bush’s administration.
SpeakingProfessor Sheldon is available to lecture on topics related to his areas of expertise. Possible talks include:
"American Founding"
"Early American Political Thought"
"Christianity"
Contact Information:
E-mail: gws@uvawise.edu
Phone: (276) 328-0274
Website: University of Virginia Faculty Page
Corwin E. Smidt
Areas of Expertise:
American Politics, Religion & Politics
Background:
Corwin E. Smidt is Professor of Political Science and Director of the Henry Institute at Calvin College.  A graduate of Northwestern College, Orange City, Iowa, he earned his M.A. and Ph.D. from the University of Iowa.  He is the author, editor, or co-author of fourteen books and has published widely in a variety of sociology and political science journals.  He has recently completed The Disappearing God Gap? Religion in the 2008 Presidential Election (Oxford University Press, 2010), The Oxford Handbook of Religion and American Politics, (Oxford University Press, 2009), and Pews, Prayers, and Participation: The Role of Religion in Fostering Civic Responsibility (Georgetown University Press, 2008).  Corwin was a founding member of the Religion and Politics section of the American Political Science Association and has served as its Executive Director.  He currently serves on the governing council of the Society for the Scientific Study of Religion.  He has served an investigator on five national surveys on religion and politics conducted during past presidential elections.   He has been quoted in the Washington Post, the New York Times, the Wall Street Journal, USA Today, the International Herald Tribune, the Los Angeles Times, and many other major newspapers.
SpeakingProfessor Smidt is available to lecture on topics related to his areas of expertise. Possible talks include:
"The Changing Role of Religion in American Presidential Elections"
"Religion and Engagement in American Civic and Political Life"
"The Changing Role of Protestant Clergy in American Public Life"
Contact Information:
E-mail: smid@calvin.edu
Phone: (616) 526-6233
Website: Calvin College Faculty Page
Gary Scott Smith
Areas of Expertise:
Religion and American politics, Particularly the faith of American presidents
Background:
Gary Scott Smith chairs the History Department and Coordinates the Humanities Core at Grove City College in Grove City, PA.  He has edited God and Politics: Four Views on the Reformation of Civil Government (1989, reissued in 2010), authored Faith and the Presidency: From George Washington to George W. Bush (2006; paperback, 2009), and contributed chapters on the faith of the founders (Samuel Adams, John Hancock) or presidents (George Washington, John Quincy Adams, Franklin Roosevelt) to Religion and the American Presidency (2007); Religion and the American Presidency (2009); The Forgotten Founders on Religion and Public Life (2009); Religion, Politics, and the Presidency: From Jamestown to the Civil War (2011); and Faith and the Founders of the American Republic (forthcoming). He served as a consultant for a special issue of Christian History and Biography (August 2008) on Faith and the American Presidency) and contributed essays on “Civil Religion in America” and George Washington.  He was a participant in “The American Presidency: Looking Forward, Looking Backward,” American Bar Association Division for Public Education, Focus on Law Studies, January 2009.  His essay “American Presidents and Civil Religion,” will be published in Derecho y Religion (Right and Religion) 5 (Summer 2011).   
SpeakingProfessor Smith is available to lecture on topics related to his areas of expertise. Possible talks include:
"An Overview of the Faith of America’s Presidents"
"The Faith of George Washington"
"The Faith of Thomas Jefferson"
"The Faith of Abraham Lincoln"
"The Faith of Franklin D. Roosevelt"
He can also lecture on the faith of, John Quincy Adams, Andrew Jackson, William McKinley, Theodore Roosevelt, Woodrow Wilson, Herbert Hoover, Harry Truman, Richard Nixon, Ronald Reagan, Bill Clinton, George W. Bush, or Barack Obama.
Contact Information:
E-mail: gssmith@gcc.edu
Phone: (724) 458-2016
Website: Grove City College Faculty Page
J. Christopher Soper
Areas of Expertise:
Religion and politics, comparative church-state relations, Islam in Western Europe, nationalism and religion, California politics, the politics of the Christian right, and the politics of Taiwan
Background:
Chris Soper is the Frank R. Seaver Professor of Political Science at Pepperdine University in Malibu, California. He received his Ph.D. from Yale University in 1992 (political science), his Master of Divinity from Yale University Divinity School in 1986 (theology) and his B.A. from the University of Washington in 1983 (political science). Soper is the co-author with Steven Monsma of the Challenges of Pluralism: Church and State in Five Western Democracies (Rowman and Littlefield, 2008); Faith, Hope, and Jobs: Welfare to Work in Los Angeles (Georgetown University Press, 2006), the co-author with Joel Fetzer of Muslims and the State in Britain, France, and Germany (Cambridge University Press, 2005), and the co-editor with Steven Monsma of Equal Treatment of Religion in a Pluralistic Society (Eerdmans, 1998); and the author of Religious Beliefs and Political Choices: Evangelical Christianity in the United States and Great Britain (New York University Press, 1994). He has also published numerous monographs, scholarly articles, and book chapters on religion and politics, comparative church-state relations, Islam in Western Europe, and the politics of the Christian Right, and Taiwanese democracy. He is currently working on a book on Taiwanese democracy. 
SpeakingProfessor Soper is available to lecture on topics related to his areas of expertise. Possible talks include:
"Muslims in Europe: Singing God's Song in a Strange Land"
"The Challenge of Religious Pluralism: What Democracy and Faith Demand"
"The Last Refuge of the Scoundrel: Religion and Nationalism Around the World"
Contact Information:
E-mail: chris.soper@pepperdine.edu
Phone: (310) 506-4792
Website: Pepperdine University Faculty Page
Carol M. Swain
Areas of Expertise:
American Politics, Public Policy, Race, Class & Gender
Background:
Carol M. Swain (B.A., Roanoke College, 1983; M.A., Virginia Polytechnic & State Univ., 1984; Ph.D., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 1989; MSL, Yale, 2000). Professor Swain has authored award-winning books including Black Faces, Black Interests: The Representation of African Americans in Congress (Harvard University Press, 1993, 1995: reprinted University Press of America, 2006). Black Faces won the Woodrow Wilson prize for the best book published in the U. S. on government, politics, or international affairs in 1994, and was cited by U.S. Supreme Court Justice Anthony Kennedy in Johnson v. DeGrandy, 512 U.S. 997 (1994) and twice by Justice Sandra Day O' Connor in Georgia V. Ashcroft, 539 U.S. (2003). 
Her books include The New White Nationalism in America: Its Challenge to Integration (Cambridge University Press, 2002) that was nominated for a Pulitzer Prize, Contemporary Voices of White Nationalism (Cambridge University Press, 2003, edited with Russ Nieli), and most recently Debating Immigration (Cambridge University Press, 2007). Her latest book is: Be the People: A Call to Reclaim America’s Faith and Promise (Forthcoming, Thomas Nelson Publishing, 2011)
She is widely recognized as an expert on race relations, immigration, black leadership, and evangelical politics. Her media appearances include BBC Radio, NPR, CNN's Andersen Cooper, Lou Dobbs Tonight, Fox’s Hannity, PBS's News Hour with Jim Lehrer, The Washington Journal,  and ABC's Headline News, Her op-eds have appeared in numerous newspapers. These include The New York Times, The Washington Post, The Wall Street Journal, The Washington Times, and USA Today. 
SpeakingDr. Swain is available to lecture on topics related to her areas of expertise. Possible talks include:
"Why Birthright Citizenship No Longer Serves America's Needs"
"Can We Save America by Reviving Patriotism and Faith in the Judeo-Christian God?"
"From GED to Ph.D.: The Carol Swain Story"
Contact Information:
E-mail: carol.swain@vanderbilt.edu
Phone: (615) 310-8617
Website: Personal Website
See Seng Tan

Areas of Expertise:

 Critical international relations theory; regionalism and regionalization in the Asia-Pacific; regional security, conflict management and                 terrorism in Southeast Asia; Singapore foreign and security policy

 

Background:

See Seng Tan (Ph.D., Arizona State, 1999) is an associate professor, deputy director of the Institute of Defence and Strategic Studies, and founding head of the Centre for Multilateralism Studies at the S. Rajaratnam School of International Studies (RSIS), Nanyang Technological University, Singapore.  He has held visiting appointments at the Australian National University, Griffith University, the International Institute for Strategic Studies, and the Singapore Institute of International Affairs.  He is a Carnegie Council Global Ethics Fellow.  He is the author and/or editor of 15 books and has published nearly 40 peer-reviewed journal articles and book chapters.  His latest efforts include a single-authored book, The Making of the Asia Pacific: Knowledge Brokers and the Politics of Representation (Amsterdam University Press, forthcoming 2013) and guest-editorship of (and contribution to) a special issue on defense diplomacy in Southeast Asia in Asian Security (Volume 8, Issue 3, 2012). He was educated at the University of Manitoba, Arizona State University, and Fuller Theological Seminary.  Together with wife, Trina, and daughter, Elisabeth, he attends Bedok Methodist Church in Singapore where he is active in the areas of worship and discipleship.

 

SpeakingProfessor Tan is available to lecture on topics related to his areas of expertise. Possible talks include:

            "Regional cooperation and institutional architecture in Asia-Pacific"

            "East Asia and Southeast Asia"
            "U.S. foreign policy towards the Asia-Pacific"
            "Singapore foreign and security policy"

Contact Information:

               E-mail: issstan@ntu.edu.sg
               Phone: (+65) 6790 4277
               Website: S. Rajaratnam School Faculty Page

Paul J. Wahlbeck
Areas of Expertise:
American Politics; Courts & Law; Judicial politics; Supreme Court decision making; strategic behavior; institutional development; quantitative empirical methods; positive political theory
Background:
Paul J. Wahlbeck (J.D., 1986; Ph.D., 1993) is a Professor of Political Science at George Washington University.  His research and teaching focus on judicial politics and research methods. He has conducted research on legal change, oral argument before the Supreme Court, strategic interaction among justices, and institutional development. He is co-author of Crafting Law on the Supreme Court: The Collegial Game (Cambridge University Press, 2000). His work has appeared in many journals, including the American Political Science Review, American Journal of Political Science, Journal of Politics, and Political Research Quarterly. He served as Director of the Law and Social Science Program at the National Science Foundation from 2001-2003 and Director of the Political Science Program at NSF in 2006.
Contact Information:
E-mail: wahlbeck@gwu.edu
Phone: (202) 994-4872
Website: George Washington University Faculty Page
Jennifer E. Walsh
Areas of Expertise:
American Politics, State and local government, crime and sentencing policy, executive branch decision making, constitutional jurisprudence
Background:
Jennifer E. Walsh is a Professor of Political Science and Associate Dean of College of Liberal Arts and Sciences at Azusa Pacific University.  She has a B.A. in Political Science from the University of California, Riverside and an M.A. in Politics and a Ph.D. in Political Science from Claremont Graduate University.  An expert in crime policy, Jennifer’s recent publications include Three Strikes Laws (Greenwood Press, 2007) and “To Do Justly and Love Mercy: Using Scripture to Guide Criminal Justice Policy” in Is the Good Book Good Enough? (Rowman & Littlefield, 2011).  In 2009, she was an invited speaker before the New Zealand parliament on pending sentencing legislation and is frequently consulted by the media on matters of crime and justice, state and local government, and American politics.  In June 2011, she was invited to participate in a faculty seminar on Religious Freedom and the Rule of Law in Shanghai and Beijing, China.  Currently, Walsh is working on a book chapter examining the influence of race, ethnicity and gender in presidential appointments to the U.S. Supreme Court and an article analyzing the impact of the federal Religious Land Use and Institutionalized Persons Act (RLUIPA) on the freedom of religion.
SpeakingProfessor Walsh is available to lecture on topics related to his areas of expertise. Possible talks include:
"The Christian Response to Crime"
"Mandatory Prison Sentences:  Benefits and Consequences"
"Executive Discretion:  Does it Undermine our System of Checks and Balances?"
Contact Information:
E-mail: jwalsh@apu.edu
Phone:  (626) 815-6000 x3502
Website: Azusa Pacific University Faculty Page
Jerold L. Waltman
Areas of Expertise:
Church-state relations in the United States and Britain; comparative constitutional law; minimum wage/living wage policies
Background:
Jerold Waltman (Ph.D., Indiana, 1976) is R.W. Morrison Professor of Political Science at Baylor University and editor of the Journal of Church and State.  He is the author most recently of Religious  Free Exercise and Contemporary American Politics:  The Saga of the Religious Land Use and  Institutionalized Persons Act of 2000 (2010).  His other books include Minimum Wage Policy in Great Britain and the United States (2008), The Case for the Living Wage (2004), and The Politics of the Minimum Wage (2000).  He has also contributed to a number of academic journals.
SpeakingProfessor Waltman is available to lecture on topics related to his areas of expertise. Possible talks include:
"Free exercise of religion in the U.S." (or the U.K.)
"The living wage as an anti-poverty policy"
"Christianity and the living wage"
Contact Information:
E-mail: Jerold_Waltman@baylor.edu
Phone:  (254) 710-6044 x3161
Website: Baylor University Faculty Page
Joseph Eugene Yi
Areas of Expertise:
Race, Immigration, Religion, civil society, Asian Americans, USA and East Asia, USA and East Asia (Korea) relations.
Background:
Joseph E. Yi (Ph.D., University of Chicago, 2004) is Assistant Professor of Public Administration at Hankuk University of Foreign Studies. Yi is author of God and Karate on on the Southside: Bridging differences, Building American Communities (Lexington Books, 2009). He also has forthcoming articles on religious participation, race, Proposition 8, and Asian-American education.
SpeakingProfessor Yi is available to discuss topics related to religious and ethnic diversity in the USA and in South Korea.
Contact Information:
E-mail: joyichicago@yahoo.com
Phone:  82-10-5872-9923
Website: 
https://sites.google.com/site/josephyiphd/Home