MY ACADEMIC MENTORS (in order of appearance)

  I’ve been exceptionally fortunate to have six amazing academic advisors who've guided me and helped shape my approach to research as well as my research interests.


My Undergraduate Mentors at the University of Chicago

 

BILL GOLDSTEIN

(website)

 

Research interests:

Judgment and decision making with an emphasis on the psychology of preference, uncertainty, and the resolution of conflicting goals. Domain-specificity of decision processes. Coordination of multiple decisions to achieve overarching goals. Planning and decision making in the face of blocked goals. Self, identity, and decision making.

REID HASTIE

(website)

 

Research interests:

Judgment and decision making (managerial, legal, medical, engineering, and personal), the neural substrates of decision processes, memory and cognition, and social psychology. Some currently active research topics include: the impact of rumors and "news" on stock market forecasts; the effects of background characteristics, such as race, on valuations of human life; the role of explanations in category concept representations (including the effects on category classification, deductive and inductive inferences); civil jury decision making; neural and physiological substrates of risky decision making; and the psychology of reading statistical graphs and maps.

 

 

 

 

My Graduate Mentors at Princeton University

 

ELDAR SHAFIR

(website)


Research interests:

Reasoning, judgment, and decision-making, and issues related to behavioral economics, with an emphasis on descriptive studies of how people make judgments and decisions in situations of conflict and uncertainty. What strategies do people employ in arriving at their decisions? Do these strategies lead to systematic biases and predictable errors? And what do these tell us about the way the mind processes the relevant information? A central theme is the tension between normative assumptions and behavioral findings. Most recently, the focus has been on decision making in the context of poverty and, more generally, on the application of behavioral research to policy.

ALEX TODOROV

(website)

 

Research interests:

The cognitive and neural mechanisms of person perception with a particular emphasis on the social dimensions of face perception. Research on face perception intersects a number of different research areas – social psychology, cognitive psychology, cognitive neuroscience, and neuropsychology – and the approach in our lab is multidisciplinary. We use a variety of methods from behavioral and functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) experiments to eye tracking, and computer and statistical modeling. The span of our research ranges from the social consequences of rapid, initial person impressions to the basic neural mechanisms underlying such impressions.

DANNY OPPENHEIMER

(website)

 

Research interests:

Causal reasoning, judgment, and decision making and more specifically how reasoning about metacognition impacts judgments and decisions. I examine this in the domains of randomness, categorization, quantity estimations, value estimations, inductive reasoning, moral reasoning, risk assessment, and interpersonal attribution.

 

 

 

 

My Postdoctoral Mentor at the Warwick Business School

 

 

NICK CHATER

(website)

 

research interests:

Cognitive, computational and biological factors underlying human cognition and decision making. Fundamental principles of cognition, which might apply across several cognitive domains. The cognitive mechanisms underlying human rationality, and how descriptive and normative theories of rationality may interact. Problems of uncertain inference, that arise in learning, reasoning, and perception; and in models of judgment and decision making, based on cognitive principles. Real-world applications of the cognitive and decision sciences.