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How to Refuse/Opt Out

How to Opt Out or Refuse High Stakes Tests in 5 Easy Steps:

(This is for informational purposes - this is not legal advice.)


        1.     Articulate your position for Opting Out/Refusal.  (link movies) and find out what your district uses NJASK scores for (e.g., placement in gifted and talented programs, honors programs, promotion, etc.).  If you are committed to your position, proceed to Step 2.

        2.     Write a letter to your district superintendent.  Copy as many people as you would like.  At a minimum, include the principal and classroom teacher.  (link letters)

        3.    Wait for a response.  The State Department of Education just issued guidance to Montclair Public Schools.  The following was taken from a memo to principals from the district.

The State Department of Education is now backing away from this saying that the State 'has no Opt Out policy' - this means that districts have a great deal of latitude in how they respond.  

The V2 coding may still be the best shot at keeping your kids in school and going to class across the testing and make-up days.

Timothy Steele-Dadzie, NJASK 6-8 Test Coordinator explained the following:


If the Principal is notified before or on the day of NJASK Testing by a parent via email. formal letter, phone call and/or face to face conversation that his/her child will not be participating in the NJASK testing, this is considered a premeditated "Parent Refusal" and the following actions should be taken:


1. On the day of testing, confirm with student if they will/will not be participating in testing. If not, alternate plans for students should be made such as independent reading, schoolwork in a non- testing room with teacher/ substitute. These arrangements are to be building-based and should be planned for prior to testing dates.


2. For each of these students, complete an irregularity report, Appendix F of the Test Coordinator Manual. Irregularity type #13 should be noted and indicate  “parental  refusal”  in  the  additional   information section. Submit the irregularity report, along with student answer folder, in the purple Irregularity Envelope when returning materials.


If a student refuses to test on the day of or during testing for reasons such as test anxiety or disruptive behavior,  this  is  considered  a  “spontaneous  refusal”  and  the  following  actions  should  be  taken:


1. If this should happen, remove student from testing room.


2. Complete an irregularity report, Appendix F of the Test Coordinator Manual. Irregularity type #10 should be noted and a Void 2 should be gridded on the student answer folder for that section. Submit the irregularity report, along with student answer folder, in the purple Irregularity Envelope when returning materials.


        4.     Clarify the terms of your child’s day during testing. 

a.    Ask what the procedure will be for your child on the day of testing.

b.    Practice how students will refuse the test - "No thank you , I am not taking the test"

c.    Confirm with the school that your child is not testing at testing time

                              

        5.     Repeat the process next year.  More parents will join us and we will end this CCSS, TEACHNJ, and PARCC madness.

 

**Please remember that there are many ways to resist the CCSS, NJASK and PARCC, and TEACHNJ.  If opting out isn’t right for your family, there are many other ways to push back.  Opting out may be the strongest statement you can make as a parent, but if it is not right for your family, you should not do it.  We still need your help in many other ways.

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Susan Schutt,
Nov 2, 2014, 11:00 AM
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Susan Schutt,
Nov 2, 2014, 10:46 AM
Ċ
Susan Schutt,
Nov 2, 2014, 11:00 AM
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