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Let's Get Free: A Hip-Hop Theory of Justice
Let's Get Free: A Hip-Hop Theory of Justice
Drawing on his personal fascinating story as a prosecutor, a defendant, and an observer of the legal process, Paul Butler offers a sharp and engaging critique of our criminal justice system. He argues against discriminatory drug laws and excessive police power and shows how our policy of mass incarceration erodes communities and perpetuates crime. Controversially, he supports jury nullification?or voting ?not guilty” out of principle?as a way for everyday people to take a stand against unfair laws, and he joins with the ?Stop Snitching” movement, arguing that the reliance on informants leads to shoddy police work and distrust within communities. Butler offers instead a ?hip hop theory of justice,” parsing the messages about crime and punishment found in urban music and culture. Butler’s argument is powerful, edgy, and incisive.

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Red Bikini Beauty , Wife by the Sea
Red Bikini Beauty ,  Wife by the Sea
Summer is hot, so we love to cool off at the beach. My wife and I don't tan much but we still love putting on our swimsuit and in her case a lovely bikini and taking a walk in the waves and then slowing wading in to the cool water. The Pacific Ocean is nice in late July, August and September and right now its packed with all kinds of people. Young, old, teens, babies, mothers, fathers, grandparents and boys and girls having a ball jumping into the water or building a sandcastle. One of our favorite spots in south California is Torrey Pines Beach. You usually have to pay for parking but you can spend all day or come late like we do and enjoy the red, orange, yellow, and purple sunset and maybe even see the green flash at the end. We may be gray now but I don't think we will ever get tired of sunlight, ocena, a cool breeze and the fantastic views of nature, and people having fun in the water. Its a little slice of heaven on earth and worth the time and energy to get here. Bring a picnic or try a fish taco after your beach shower. Swimming, walking, reading or napping in the sand its all good for the heart and soul as well as your body. Thanks to my wife who tolerates my running around with the camera. She's happy here too and is still a sexy babe at any age. I feel blessed and wish the best to the world too. Cheers.
Nature Woman, Beauty in the Sun
Nature Woman, Beauty in the Sun
It was a very hot day as we drove the winding road along the Feather River valley We stopped at a little pull out called Indain Falls. It was in a lovely forest with a small rocky beach. We had a picnic and then since it was a hundred degrees out going for a cold swim instead of a sweaty hike was the better idea. The river pool was icy cold and you could only stand to be wet for a minute or two. I got all they way in but my wife only waded in up to her knees. We did get cool and watched a few brave, strong young men climb the cliffs and jump off. again. The only shade was under some giant gray blue boulders where we read our paperback books and later my fantastic wife agreed to model for a few moments. It was a great spot with lovely colour contrast from the stone and her swimsuit and body. We did get cool and them had to jump back in the very warm car and drive home. One splendid trip. Blessings to all.

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free hip hop ringtone download
Let's Get Free: A Hip-Hop Theory of Justice
"Paul Butler utilizes his years as a prosecutor and law teacher to dramatically describe this country's war on crime as one encouraging what it seeks to eliminate, corrupting those commissioned to enforce its laws and, in the process, ruining more lives than it protects. Butler conveys this tragedy with a wry humor and through a careful review of studies, experience, and insight."
--Derrick Bell, author of Faces at the Bottom of the Well and visiting professor at NYU Law School


"A provocative and intelligent analysis of U.S. justice. Butler has a fresh and thought-provoking perspective on issues like the war on drugs, snitches, and whether locking so many people up really makes Americans safer. Butler's compelling writing makes Let's Get Free a great read, and his insightful analysis has the potential to make the United States a more just society."
--Anthony D. Romero, executive director, American Civil Liberties Union



"Let's Get Free is a tour de force. This book is provocative and informative and creates a cross-generational dialogue that will enrich all those who read it. It helps us understand the complexity of crime and the need to moderate punishment. This is a good read and a must read."
--Charles J, Ogletree Jr., author of When Law Fails, professor of law at Harvard and the executive director of the Charles Hamilton Houston Institute for Race and Justice



Paul Butler was an ambitious federal prosecutor, a Harvard Law grad who traded in his corporate law salary to fight the good fight. It was those years on the front lines that convinced him that the American criminal justice system is fundamentally broken--it's not making the streets safer, nor helping the people he'd hoped, as a prosecutor, to protect.



In Let's Get Free, Butler, now an award-winning law professor, looks at several places where ordinary citizens interact with the justice system--as jurors, crime witnesses, and in encounters with the police--and explores what "doing the right thing" means in a corrupt system.



Butler's provocative proposals include jury nullification--voting "not guilty" in certain non-violent cases as a form of protest, just saying "no" when the police request your permission to search, and refusing to work inside the criminal justice system. And his groundbreaking "hip-hop theory of justice" reveals an important analysis of crime and punishment found in pop culture.



Chock full of great stories and cutting-edge analysis, this accessible and lively critique will change the way you think about crime and punishment in the United States. As Butler eloquently argues, when we end mass incarceration and excessive police power, everyone wins. Let's Get Free offers a powerful new vision of justice.

"Paul Butler utilizes his years as a prosecutor and law teacher to dramatically describe this country's war on crime as one encouraging what it seeks to eliminate, corrupting those commissioned to enforce its laws and, in the process, ruining more lives than it protects. Butler conveys this tragedy with a wry humor and through a careful review of studies, experience, and insight."
--Derrick Bell, author of Faces at the Bottom of the Well and visiting professor at NYU Law School


"A provocative and intelligent analysis of U.S. justice. Butler has a fresh and thought-provoking perspective on issues like the war on drugs, snitches, and whether locking so many people up really makes Americans safer. Butler's compelling writing makes Let's Get Free a great read, and his insightful analysis has the potential to make the United States a more just society."
--Anthony D. Romero, executive director, American Civil Liberties Union



"Let's Get Free is a tour de force. This book is provocative and informative and creates a cross-generational dialogue that will enrich all those who read it. It helps us understand the complexity of crime and the need to moderate punishment. This is a good read and a must read."
--Charles J, Ogletree Jr., author of When Law Fails, professor of law at Harvard and the executive director of the Charles Hamilton Houston Institute for Race and Justice



Paul Butler was an ambitious federal prosecutor, a Harvard Law grad who traded in his corporate law salary to fight the good fight. It was those years on the front lines that convinced him that the American criminal justice system is fundamentally broken--it's not making the streets safer, nor helping the people he'd hoped, as a prosecutor, to protect.



In Let's Get Free, Butler, now an award-winning law professor, looks at several places where ordinary citizens interact with the justice system--as jurors, crime witnesses, and in encounters with the police--and explores what "doing the right thing" means in a corrupt system.



Butler's provocative proposals include jury nullification--voting "not guilty" in certain non-violent cases as a form of protest, just saying "no" when the police request your permission to search, and refusing to work inside the criminal justice system. And his groundbreaking "hip-hop theory of justice" reveals an important analysis of crime and punishment found in pop culture.



Chock full of great stories and cutting-edge analysis, this accessible and lively critique will change the way you think about crime and punishment in the United States. As Butler eloquently argues, when we end mass incarceration and excessive police power, everyone wins. Let's Get Free offers a powerful new vision of justice.

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