RESTAURANT EQUIPMENT FOR SALE BY OWNER. SALE BY OWNER

RESTAURANT EQUIPMENT FOR SALE BY OWNER. KENT HOME MEDICAL EQUIPMENT.

Restaurant Equipment For Sale By Owner


restaurant equipment for sale by owner
    restaurant
  • A place where people pay to sit and eat meals that are cooked and served on the premises
  • a building where people go to eat
  • A restaurant prepares and serves food, drink and dessert to customers. Meals are generally served and eaten on premises, but many restaurants also offer take-out and food delivery services. Restaurants vary greatly in appearance and offerings, including a wide variety of cuisines and service models.
  • Restaurant is a 1998 independent film starring Adrien Brody, Elise Neal, David Moscow and Simon Baker. Written by Tom Cudworth and directed by Eric Bross, Restaurant was the follow-up to this writing–directing duo's first film, TenBenny, which also starred Adrien Brody.
    equipment
  • The process of supplying someone or something with such necessary items
  • The necessary items for a particular purpose
  • an instrumentality needed for an undertaking or to perform a service
  • The act of equipping, or the state of being equipped, as for a voyage or expedition; Whatever is used in equipping; necessaries for an expedition or voyage; the collective designation for the articles comprising an outfit; equipage; as, a railroad equipment (locomotives, cars, etc.
  • Mental resources
  • A tool is a device that can be used to produce or achieve something, but that is not consumed in the process. Colloquially a tool can also be a procedure or process used for a specific purpose.
    for sale
  • purchasable: available for purchase; "purchasable goods"; "many houses in the area are for sale"
  • For Sale is a tour EP by Say Anything. It contains 3 songs from …Is a Real Boy and 2 additional b-sides that were left off the album.
  • For Sale is the fifth album by German pop band Fool's Garden, released in 2000.
    owner
  • a person who owns something; "they are searching for the owner of the car"; "who is the owner of that friendly smile?"
  • (law) someone who owns (is legal possessor of) a business; "he is the owner of a chain of restaurants"
  • A person who owns something
  • (ownership) the relation of an owner to the thing possessed; possession with the right to transfer possession to others
restaurant equipment for sale by owner - QuickBooks for
QuickBooks for the Restaurant
QuickBooks for the Restaurant
A step-by-step guide to tracking revenue and expenses, QuickBooks for the Restaurant provides detailed instructions on how to apply the various functions of QuickBooks to control expenses, increase profits, and make informed management decisions. This comprehensive guide contains practical and realistic industry scenarios and practice problems with a section on the simulated financial activity of a typical restaurant operation. Full of helpful accounting advice, QuickBooks tips, and industry scenarios, this book demonstrates how to employ one of the most widely used accounting applications to ensure the financial success of all types of foodservice operations.
Note: CD-ROM/DVD and other supplementary materials are not included as part of eBook file.

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30 St Mary Axe "Gherkin"
30 St Mary Axe "Gherkin"
30 St Mary Axe, also known as the Gherkin and the Swiss Re Building, is a skyscraper in London's main financial district, the City of London, completed in December 2003 and opened at the end of May 2004.[2] With 40 floors, it is 180 metres (591 ft) tall,[1] and stands on the former site of the Baltic Exchange building, which was severely damaged on 10 April 1992 by the explosion of a bomb placed by the Provisional IRA. After the plans to build the Millennium Tower were dropped, the current building was designed by Norman Foster,[1] his then business partner Ken Shuttleworth[4] and Arup engineers,[5] and was erected by Skanska in 2001–2003. History The building is on the former site of the Baltic Exchange building, the headquarters of a global marketplace for ship sales and shipping information. On 10 April 1992 the Provisional IRA detonated a bomb close to the Exchange, severely damaging the historic Exchange building and neighbouring structures. The UK government's statutory adviser on the historic environment, English Heritage, and the City of London governing body, the City of London Corporation, was keen that any redevelopment must restore the building's old facade onto St Mary Axe. The Exchange Hall was a celebrated fixture of the ship trading company. After English Heritage later discovered the damage was far more severe than previously thought, they stopped insisting on full restoration, albeit over the objections of the architectural conservationists who favoured reconstruction.[8] Baltic Exchange sold the land to Trafalgar House in 1995.[9] Most of the remaining structures on the site were then carefully dismantled, the interior of Exchange Hall and the facade were preserved, hoping for a reconstruction of the building in the future.[9] In 1996 Trafalgar House submitted plans for the Millennium Tower, a 386 metres (1,266 ft) building with more than 140,000 m2 (1,500,000 sq ft) office space, apartments, shops, restaurants and gardens.[10][11] This plan was dropped after objections for being totally out-of-scale with the City of London and because of the fear that planes would fly into it;[10] the revised plan for a lower tower was accepted. The gherkin name dates back to at least 1999, referring to that plan's highly unorthodox layout and appearance.[12] Due to the current building's somewhat phallic appearance, other inventive names have also been used for the building, including the Erotic gherkin, the Towering Innuendo, and the Crystal Phallus (also a pun on Crystal Palace). Planning process Left: Looking south down Bishopsgate, one of the main roads leading through London's financial district, Right: The tower contrasted with other buildings, seen from the southern end of St Mary Axe 23 August 2000, Deputy Prime Minister John Prescott granted planning permission to construct a building much larger than the old Exchange on the site.[6] The site was special because it needed development, was not on any of the "sight lines" (planning guidance requires that new buildings do not obstruct or detract from the view of St Paul's dome when viewed from a number of locations around London), and it had housed the Baltic Exchange. The plan for the site was to reconstruct the Baltic Exchange. GMW Architects proposed building a new rectangular building surrounding a restored exchange — the square shape would have the type of large floor plan that banks liked. Eventually, the planners realised that the exchange was not recoverable, forcing them to relax their building constraints; they hinted that an "architecturally significant" building might pass favourably with city authorities. This move opened up the architect to design freely; it eliminated the restrictive demands for a large, capital-efficient, money-making building that favoured the client. Swiss Re's low level plan met the planning authority's desire to maintain London's traditional streetscape with its relatively narrow streets. The mass of the Swiss Re tower was not too imposing. Like Barclays Bank's former City headquarters, the passerby is nearly oblivious to the tower's existence in neighbouring streets until directly underneath it. Design and construction The top floor of the Gherkin. The building was constructed by Skanska, completed in December 2003 and opened on 28 April 2004.[2] The primary occupant of the building is Swiss Re, a global reinsurance company, who had the building commissioned as the head office for their UK operation. As owners, their company name lends itself to another nickname for the building, variants on Swiss Re Tower, although this has never been an official title. The building uses energy-saving methods which allow it to use half the power a similar tower would typically consume.[17] Gaps in each floor create six shafts that serve as a natural ventilation system for the entire building even though required firebreaks on every sixth floor interrupt the "chimney." The shafts create a giant
The Gherkin!
The Gherkin!
When I first saw this building from afar I didn't like it. But having seen it close up and reading up on it - it has grown on me! From Wikipedia: The building was designed by Lord Foster, then-partner Ken Shuttleworth[1] and Arup engineers The building is on the former site of the Baltic Exchange building, the headquarters of a global marketplace for ship sales and shipping information. On 10 April 1992 the Provisional IRA detonated a bomb close to the Exchange, severely damaging the historic Exchange building and neighbouring structures. The UK government's statutory adviser on the historic environment, English Heritage, and the City of London governing body, the City of London Corporation, insisted[citation needed] that any redevelopment must restore the building's old facade onto St Mary Axe. The Exchange Hall was a celebrated fixture of the ship trading company. Baltic Exchange, being unable to afford such an undertaking, sold the land to Trafalgar House in 1995. Most of the remaining structures on the site were then carefully dismantled; the interior of Exchange Hall and the facade were preserved and sealed from the elements. After English Heritage later discovered the damage was far more severe than previously thought, they stopped insisting on full restoration, albeit over the objections of the architectural conservationists who favoured reconstruction In 1996 Trafalgar House submitted plans for the Millennium Tower, a 386 metres (1,266 ft) building with more than 90,000 m? (1 million ft?) office space, and public viewing platform at 305 m (1,000 ft).[3] This plan was dropped after objections; the revised plan for a lower tower was accepted. The gherkin name dates back to at least 1999[4], referring to that plan's highly unorthodox layout. Due to the current building's somewhat phallic appearance, other inventive names have also been used for the building, including the Erotic gherkin, the Towering Innuendo, the Crystal Phallus (also a pun on Crystal Palace), and the glass dildo. On 23 August 2000, Deputy Prime Minister John Prescott granted planning permission to construct a building much larger than the old Exchange on the site. The site was special in Westminster because it needed development, was not on any of the "sight lines" (planning guidance requires that new buildings do not obstruct or detract from the view of St Paul's dome when viewed from a number of locations around London), and it had housed the Baltic Exchange.[8] The plan for the site was to reconstruct the Baltic Exchange. GMW Architects proposed building a new rectangular building surrounding a restored exchange — the square shape would have the type of large floor plan that banks liked. Eventually, the planners realised that the exchange was not recoverable, forcing them to relax their building constraints; they hinted that an "architecturally significant" building might pass favourably with city authorities. This move opened up the architect to design freely; it eliminated the restrictive demands for a large, capital-efficient, money-making building that favoured the client. Another major influence during the project's gestation was Canary Wharf. At the time, banks and commercial institutions were moving to Canary Wharf, because the area allowed buildings with modern, large floor plans. The City of London was not approving such buildings, forcing firms to disperse their staff across many sites. When the city realised the mass defection its policies were causing, it relaxed its opposition to high-rise buildings. Swiss Re's low level plan met the planning authority's desire to maintain London's traditional streetscape with its relatively narrow streets. The mass of the Swiss Re tower was not too imposing. Like Barclays Bank's former City headquarters, the passerby is nearly oblivious to the tower's existence in neighbouring streets until directly underneath it. Such planning rules/goals create a city's visual identity — e.g. New York City's plot ratio and setback rules have had an enormous impact on how it looks compared to cities with more conservative rules like London and Paris. The building was constructed by Skanska, completed in December 2003 and opened on 28 April 2004. The base of the towerThe building uses energy-saving methods which allow it to use half the power a similar tower would typically consume. Gaps in each floor create six shafts that serve as a natural ventilation system for the entire building even though required firebreaks on every sixth floor interrupt the "chimney." The shafts create a giant double glazing effect; air is sandwiched between two layers of glazing and insulates the office space inside. Architects limit double glazing in residential houses to avoid the inefficient convection of heat, but the Swiss Re tower exploits this effect. The shafts pull warm air out of the building during the summer and warm the building in the winter using passive solar h

restaurant equipment for sale by owner
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